A Sunday Above The Rain (Blu-ray)

SKU: 0209427ERE
Label:
Ear Music
Format:
BLU-RAY
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Sorry about the price but there is no US release scheduled.  This is an all region NTSC European import.

"Since 2002, Marillion celebrate themselves and their fans in an extraordinary way. Every two years, the band and their most dedicated fans gather together for a very special weekend in the UK, the Netherlands and Canada. On three nights, Marillion perform three different shows with different set-lists consisting of full records played from start to finish, fan favourites and rarities. Fans travel from all over the world to be part of these truly amazing nights. From March 8 to March 10, 2013 one of the weekends was held in Port Zelande, Netherlands and featured a grand premiere: for the first time, Marillion performed their most recent and widely acclaimed studio album “Sounds That Can’t Be Made” in its entirety on March 10. And what a performance it was: the venue, the 2.500 strong audience and the songs were what made the night unique. Let’s put it this way: Holland delivered the usual grandeur of the Port Zelenade gigs. Besides the eight album tracks, the band also performed a selection of fan favourites ranging from “This Strange Engine” to “Garden Party”, the most successful single from the band’s debut album from the Fish-era. Rarely or hardly ever performed by front man Steve Hogarth, the song definitely is one of the evening’s highlights. Guitarist Steve Rothery is sure that “the best audience on the planet” was attending the concert whereas his band mate Pete Trewavas adds that “it was such a good vibe that year” and that “it never ceases to amaze him staring over the crowd”. Of course, the night was also very memorable to the fans: “Just to say WOW...... What a weekend and what an experience we had!!!!” - Robert Mercieca (Malta). “What a convention!! What a vibe!! Oh my goodness!!” - PM van der Kroft (Netherlands). “All the gigs were excellent.” - Charlie Carnegie (UK) After the surprise success of the 2011 live release “Live From Cadogan Hall”, “A Sunday Night Above The Rain” is able to hold up to the quality of that release and is even able to exceed it. Released on 2CD, 2DVD and Blu-ray, “A Sunday Night Above The Rain” provides the best possible sound and glorious high defi nition vision. Simply said, it’s one of the band’s finest releases so far."

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It's an odd choice for a single. I thought it would be 'The Simple Story' which is more instantly recognizable with its melodies and the great piano line near the end. 'Crowded Corridors' is possibly their most accomplished composition to date and also their longest by far at nearly 9 minutes. It begins relatively subdued with their typical instrumentation and vocalizations, if more haunting than usual. Something else going for it is the more 'epic', dramatic moments that work incredibly well. It'd be interesting if they revisit this approach to songwriting in later albums. A particular highlight, besides the obvious piano solo in the latter half, is a slow melody at minute 3 being revisited at the very end at a faster pace.By the way, most of these songs deviate from a typical song structure to help make it more impactful and dynamic. The song 'Gerda' starts very soft and delicate but later sounds very empowering and grand: it's yet another great song. 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    $12.00
  • Third album from this fine Italian band.  Empyrios is led by DGM guitarist Simone Mularoni. In the past the band would seamlessly blend prog and industrial metal.  This time the music veers much more towards the heavier end of the spectrum.  There are some remnants of prog left but really they are going more for a sound akin to Nevermore and Mnemic.  Vocalist Silvio Mancini jumps back and forth between clean and harsh vocals enough to keep things interesting.  Crushing stuff.
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