Out Of Order Comes Chaos

SKU: MMP0197
Label:
Metal Mind Productions
Format:
NTSC
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Pro-shot DVD filmed on the Passion tour at Wyspianski Theatre in Poland from April 2011.  Comes with some bonus video footage - Nick Barrett interview and other stuff.

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  • "Plastic Soup is the first album of the new Dutch Progressive rock band PBII, the successor to the well known Plackband of the 70's and 80's, often called the Dutch Genesis. Plastic Soup however, has a sound that is absolutely 2010: modern, fresh and rocky but still with some great symphonic influences of the past. Stylistically, you could place it somewhere between Spocks Beard, Porcupine Tree, Frost*, Marilion, Linkin Park and Genesis. Special guests include John Mitchell (Arena, It Bites, Frost*), John Jowitt (IQ, Frost*) and Heidi Jo Hines (daughter of Denny Laine of Wings. Though not a concept album, the central theme of the album is the environment. Plastic Soup is another name for the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, floating in the ocean with a size twice that of the US. Discoverer of this plastic soup is captain Charles Moore, who also did some voice overs on the album. PBII wishes to get more attention to this environmental problem. "
    $3.00
  • So what does a heralded jazz organist do in his spare time?  Create an epic prog rock album of course.  Some of you may be familiar with Jim Alfredson and his organ jazz trio Organissmo.  Theo is a side project that must scratch Jim's itch to let loose with a whole arsenal of keyboards (don't worry - that Hammond figures quite prominently).  Its very clear that Jim is heavily influenced by the classic prog bands of the 70s. You can hear some elements of Yes, ELP, Pink Floyd and a host of classic rock bands in the DNA of the material but overall its a very contemporary sounding album.  In that way its similar to Beardfish in the sense that Jim takes the old school sounds and adds it to something modern so you here the echoes of the grand old days but it doesn't sound dated at all.  I can listen to stuff like this 24/7.  Highly recommended. "Formed by world reknown keyboardist Jim Alfredson (organissimo, Dirty Fingers, Janiva Magness, Greg Nagy Band, Root Doctor) THEO harkens back to the keyboard-centric superbands of the 1970s like Yes, Genesis, and Emerson Lake and Palmer, but with a distinctly modern and bold approach.THEO also represents a return to the concept of the keyboardist as a vital and irreplaceable part of the group, rather than a mere sideman.The intrepid and dynamic music is paired with auspicious lyrical themes of corporatization, consumerism, loss of innocence, exile, and the obsession with celebrity. Lead vocals are handled by Alfredson himself. Usually relegated to background duties, Alfredson's surprisingly flexible baritone voice shifts from soaring muscularity to intimate falsetto and everything between.The eponymous debut album features six tracks including an epic three song opening suite comprising 24 minutes."
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  • One of the great Swiss prog rarities of the 70s.  Kedama were an instrumental three piece.  Focusing on keyboards, guitars, and drums, they bore a bit of an influence from Yes.  When the keyboards are emphasizied (insert Mellotron gasps and groans here) I'm reminded a bit of Schicke Fuhrs Frohling.  The proper album consisted of 4 tracks - it wasn't a long album.  It was recorded live in the studio and the production is pretty miserable.  At least the music compensates for it.  This CD comes with seven bonus tracks!  Highly recommended.
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  • "The amazing musicians from Uzbekistan are back with “Sodom and Gomorrah,” a concept CD that features the acclaimed original FROMUZ line-up of Vitaly Popeloff (guitars), Albert Khalmurzaev (keyboards, guitars, vocals, harmonica), Vladimir Badirov (drums), and Andrey Mara-Novik (bass), plus Evgeniy Popelov (keyboards, vocals).“Sodom & Gomorrah” was originally composed by multi-instrumentalist Albert Khalmurzaev as the soundtrack for a theatrical musical production of the same name at the Youth Theatre of Uzbekistan. Reinterpreting the Biblical tale of “Sodom and Gomorrah” as a conceptual foundation, it tells the story of our modern world, ravaged by global addictions and vice that can only be remedied through a change from within the very heart of the human condition.This concept is conveyed through the well-established passion and incendiary musicianship that has become the hallmark of FROMUZ.  This is modern progressive rock at its very finest.FROMUZ originally performed “Sodom and Gomorrah” live over the course of three years, starting in 2004, actively working with the Youth Theater in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, as well as performances at prestigious theater festivals in St. Petersburg, Russia, the International Chekhov Festival (Moscow, Russia), and more.  The band recorded the soundtrack during this time-frame, but it wasn’t until 2012 that the decision was made to return to those tracks, editing, mixing, and mastering them for an official release."
    $12.00
  • "Led by Mark Peters, shoegaze misfits Engineers have been making brilliant records for nearly 10 years now, yet the limelight afforded to similar-sounding bands such as The Horrors has always eluded them. On 'Always Returning', their fourth album, they've delivered yet again. 'Bless The Painter', which spits at a social-media generation obsessed with photographing artworks for their news feeds rather than to admire their beauty, sets a glacial tempo. Centrepiece 'A Million Voices' is a driving, motorik synth masterpiece and 'Searched For Answers' shows subtle restraint, but the album slips up when it get too blissed out for its own good ('Drive Your Car'). Even so, it's about time this lot got the credit they deserve. " - NME
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  • "Considered to be the some of their finest work since Agents of Fortune , this flight of dark fantasy, which includes the Top 40 hit, Burnin' for You , will satisfy the souls of Cult fans everywhere!"
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  • 2LP vinyl edition of this long out of print title. Originally released as a limited edition it collects all the outtakes and bonus tracks from the Stupid Dream and Lightbulb Sun sessions plus rare singles tracks.
    $29.00
  • "Ethan Matthews and ECHO US are able to achieve true success with their masterpiece "II:XII, A Priori Memoriae." The album is one the best progressive rock albums of the century. Such a production made up of wonderful melodies, clever dramaturgy and compelling dynamics itself, is something that even the top of the class Mike Oldfield was not able to achieve through decades of work, including after his album "Ommadawn". The warmth and intensity of the album's overall sound - where Ethan Matthews emerges from his cacoon as brilliant composer - can still be heard despite digital recording technology. He constructs an acoustic reflection of grand experiences out of his hometown's heritage and his musical past with the progressive metal musicians from GREYHAVEN. It is a journey held through sound structures made up of memories from the past to the futuristic sprawling sound collages from the modern era. The complex sound structures and Matthews' diversified guitar work magically and powerfully pull the listener into a vortex of senses. 'A Priori' literally means "from the former" in Latin. The album looks back on other levels of consciousness expressed in the preceding works of the trilogy, as if within an afterlife. Flowing as one long work based off of a few melodic motifs, "À Priori Memoriaé" is truly a 'classical' work in many ways, fusing ancient and modern instruments to create a stream of consciousness. Musicians including the Grammy-nominated singer Henta, harpist Raelyn Olsen, Chris Smith (Flutes) and Christina Fitzgerald (Oboe) purify "II:XII, A Priorie Memoriae" creating a masterpiece, an innovative, perfect and unique classic. This kind of music has not been seen in over 40 years since Mike Oldfield's "Ommadawn" or Jon Anderson's "Olias Of Sunhillow!" It is somehow the comeback of concept albums that permanently shaped the genre in the 1970s."
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  • Second album from this Italian progressive metal band finds them with a new lineup. Now fronting the band is vocalist Fabio Manda and there is also a new bassist in Claudio Casaburi. No major changes in direction. This is Dream Theater inspired progressive metal chock full of solos and interaction between guitar and keys. Manda shares a similar fate to just about every metal vocalist from Italy - he has a bit of an accent. But the dude can sing and can really hit the high notes so it doesn't really get in the way. There are two notable guests on the album. Marco Sfogli contributes a solo and Sieges Even/Subsignal vocalist Arno Menses is featured on the near 17 minute "Aftermath". The production is much better than their debut. Mixed by Markus Teske, the drums no longer sound like pencils smacked on a desk. Where as there used to be a million of these Dream Theater influenced bands kicking around in Italy (remember Zen?) they have all gone off to work at the Fiat factory. Soul Secret are the torch carriers of the moment and acquit themselves quite nicely thank you. Highly recommended to fans of intricate prog metal.
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  • Deluxe mediabook edition.  CD plus a DVD with 5.1 surround mix, 24 bit stereo, and a "making of" video."Always fond of conceptual storytelling, Ian Anderson goes himself one better with his latest prog-folk-metal concept album. The 15 songs of Homo Erraticus inhabit not one but two metafictional layers. The Gerald Bostock character, hero/anti-hero of the seminal Jethro Tull album Thick as a Brick and its recent sequel Thick as a Brick 2, is back again, having now discovered a manuscript left behind in the 1920s by a malaria-ridden old British soldier delightfully named Ernest T. Parritt.Parritt's supposed writings range over northern European history from the Mesolithic era to his own - and on into his future, through the whole 20th century and into our own time and beyond. Winnowed into lyrics written by "Bostock" and set to music by the real protagonist of the story, Ian Anderson, these materials give Anderson - whose creative scope and energy remain robust even as his singing voice has thinned with age - a walk-in-closetful of pegs on which to hang a sequence of songs evoking nothing less than the history of mankind in his part of the world.The first track, "Doggerland," commemorates the area of the southern North Sea that used to be dry land connecting today's British Isles with the rest of Europe. Doggerland vanished under the waves as the last Ice Age ended but, as fisherman discovered not long ago, the sea floor retains much archeological evidence of human occupation. The succeeding songs address migrations, metalworking, invasions (from the Romans to Burger King), the arrival of Christianity, the Industrial Revolution, and so on. To appreciate the songs, you'll want to (at least once) follow along with the notes and lyrics in the accompanying 32-page booklet.The Foreword, in which Anderson discusses the history of Jethro Tull and why he hasn't used the band name for his last few recordings, will especially interest longtime Tull fans. The real question is, will the songs themselves? Some yes, some no. The gruff metal of "Doggerland" gives way to the sweet, plinking folk of "Heavy Metals." (I imagine Anderson chuckling to himself at the irony - no pun intended - of creating such a gentle-sounding song with that title, and on that literal topic.) Both satisfy my Tull craving. "Meliora Sequamur" (Let Us Follow Better Things), which paints a picture of 12th century schoolboys amid religious chant (and cant), does too, and "The Turnpike Inn" is a solid rocker, and the hard-Celtic style of "The Engineer" moves briskly.I like the instrumental track "Tripudium ad Bellum" (Dancing to War). It starts off with an echo of a theme from the original Thick as a Brick (there are others elsewhere on the album), then resolves into a 5/4 march, like a more insistent "Living in the Past." War's aftermath appears in the next track, the sad, deliberate "After These Wars," in which I really feel the lack of Anderson's full-strength vocals. While he was never among rock's greatest singers, that didn't matter - when he sang his songs, you always felt he was all there, and that's what mattered. But now, and not only in the harder songs that shade into old-school heavy metal, his voice just isn't always a match for his music's energy any more.On the other hand, his gift for crafting pleasing, original melodies, writing smart, clever lyrics in complete sentences and true rhyme, and setting much of it in non-traditional time signatures remains strong. The first verse of "After These Wars" reads:After battle, with wounds to lick andbeaus and belles all reuniting.Rationing, austerity: it did us good after the fighting.Now, time to bid some fond farewells andwalk away from empires crumbling.Post-war baby-boom to fuel with post-Victorian half-dressed fumbling.No one in pop music writes like that anymore.Listening to the album as a complete conceptual work, my overall feeling is that there isn't very much new here. Since the 1960s Anderson and Tull have explored countless different musical paths and styles. Some of these produced some of my all-time favorite songs and recordings. Others I hated. But he never seemed to be resting on his laurels. Here I feel like I'm reading a chapter that's not much different from the last chapter.But listening to the songs individually, I like a lot of them. As I write this I'm trying to count the beats of the off-time closer, "Cold Dead Reckoning," with its grim imagery of a future of lost souls navigating their way over a metaphysical Doggerland "amongst the ranks and files of walking dead." I hear crunching minor-key guitar-bass-piano unison figures, a sprightly flute solo. A hopeful verse about "angels watching over" at the end doesn't convince me, as the music continues to growl on as before. Yet there follow a sweet, gentle instrumental coda, reminded us that while things may not turn out well for humanity as we teem over and ruin our only planet, our capacity to create and to appreciate beauty will be with us as long as we live. So let's raise the cup of crimson wonder to Ian Anderson as he charges not-so-gently through his seventh decade." - Seattle Pi
    $17.00
  • Limited edition digipak comes with a bonus live CD."Even if I’d spend a decent amount of time, I don’t think I would be able to find an average album in BRAINSTORM’s discography. You can try it for yourself but I am sure you’ll realize that this German band has been releasing very good albums being extremely reliable to its fan base. I am sure some will object to my statement by saying that the albums are indeed good but not stellar. Then you’d reach to the dilemma of what a metalhead prefers his favorite band to release; a couple of really good albums or keep a constant quality level? On the other hand, over-thinking music takes a huge chunk of just-having-fun time, so I will leave all these questions to the hands/minds of the deep thinkers because “Firesoul” comes with ten great songs to sing and headbang along.“Erased By The Dark” opens the album and the trained ear should not have a single problem recognizing the (by now) trademark BRAINSTORM sound. Andy B. Franck’s powerful voice is once again delivering a hearty collection of vocal melodies that do not need a lot of time to get you humming or even singing along. The guitars have a US Power Metal quality that is hard to miss and impossible to fail, so please crank the volume up during the fat rhythm of the self-titled track and “Entering Solitude” (love the opening guitar groove here). “Shadowseeker” steps on the gas and throws in the mix some killer leads that guide the song to a climax during the solo before passing the baton to the album’s highlight, “Feed Me Lies”. This song could easily be a BRAINSTORM showcase for those who have missed this band completely bringing along; the dialogue-like mix of the lead-vocals, the collection of catchy melodies (I challenge you to resist singing along the chorus) and the awesome double guitar action that tops everything off. The band’s German ancestry comes to surface through the solid rhythm that can make you think of PRIMAL FEAR or SINNER; in other words, Power Metal in its finest and obviously I am not talking about the cheesy/cookie cutter one. I have no idea about the bonus material (I will hunt the vinyl edition anyway) but having the album in repeat-mode made me think that the mid-tempo and kind of dark “…And I Wonder” leads to the faster and heavier album’s opener in a natural way, so it will keep you listening.After listening more than it would be enough to write my thoughts/opinion about it, I realized that “Firesoul” is better than the last two albums and I think I enjoyed it as I did “Liquid Monster” that placed BRAINSTORM under my music-radar. This album is the perfect way to starting dealing with this band that I think has not received the deserved recognition (yet) and I will again refer you to its high-quality backcatalogue." - Metal Kaoz
    $16.00
  • "The string finally ran out for Bad Company with their fourth album, Burnin' Sky. Their approach was so simple that it almost inevitably became formulaic, and although Mick Ralphs continued to screech with his sparse guitar leads and Paul Rodgers continued to present his lust in a soulful voice -- well, one had heard it all before several times by now. A band that begins life declaring "I can't get enough of your love" doesn't really have anywhere to go, and by this, their fourth album, Bad Company were getting sloppy around the edges, tossing in a '50s pastiche in "Everything I Need," crooning "The Happy Wanderer" as if they were on a drunken pub crawl. There were plenty of those patented ominous midtempo rockers, too, of course, but nothing you'd want to add to the set list. Of course, the real reason this was the first of the band's LPs to miss the Top Ten in the U.S. and the U.K. is that last point: only one hit single in the title track. Clearly, it was time to try something new, but after three years of stadium rocking, what Bad Company wanted to try instead was a vacation; they weren't heard from again for two years." - Allmusic
    $6.00
  • Umm...this band is insane.  I mean that in a good way.  Miserium is a quartet from Hungary.  This is one of those off kilter releases that is constantly challenging you.  There is a strong similarity to Leprous and early Pain of Salvation.  As far as a comparison, while I think that Leprous closest hits the mark the band does acknowledge the PoS influence by dedicating a song to Daniel Gildenlow.Mostly clean vocals but with occasional growlies.  There is an agressive quality to the music but everything is constantly shifting in tempos and mood.  Toss in sound samples taken from movie soundtracks and you'll really be scratching your head.  Its one of those albums where you don't know what's coming next but you have to listen carefully so you don't miss anything.This is what progressive metal is all about.  BUY OR DIE! 
    $15.00