Live At The End Of The World (DVD/CD)

SKU: NPR511
Label:
Napalm Records
Format:
NTSC
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Power Metal
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Pro-shot live DVD (with bonus CD) from this Scottish pirate metal band filmed in Australia and New Zealand in 2013.  I can't believe I typed "pirate metal".  Shiver me timbers!

 

 

 

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  • "I’ve only just got hold of this one, but it’s jumped to the top of my review list on the basis of being awesome. Being off ill at the start of the week, I had a significant pile of demos and promos to download at the weekend and I was ploughing through them. I always give a couple of tracks off each album a very quick listen just so I know what genre they are.Being a puerile child at heart, I obviously picked “Fuck You” out from the tracklist on Nightglow’s latest release and was immediately blown away. It’s a heavy song, full of groove and rhythm with harsh yet understandable lyrics.OK, so a lucky choice. Let’s pick… erm… “Scream”. That sound good. And it is. As was “On My Knees”, “Psychotropic” and every other song on Orpheus. What started as a quick check of the mp3s turned into two full listens to the album.Nightglow have been kicking around since 1998, but didn’t become Nightglow until 2003. Up until 2013 they were primarily a live band playing their own music, covers of songs by classic acts (Maiden, Priest and the like) and also enjoyed a stint as the official Italian Manowar tribute act!Metal credentials well and truly approved, the band finally released their first album, We Rise, in 2013. Obviously by now the band had a wealth of their own material so it only took another 18 months or so before the follow-up, Orpheus, was announced.This is a great album. Totally unpretentious, balls-out heavy metal. It doesn’t seem to take itself too seriously, remembering that metal is about having fun and being loud! Oh, and doing the stock power ballad (“Stay With Me”)." -  The Moshville Times
    $13.00
  • In Crescendo is the fourth studio album from this Italian progressive band.  While originally working in a purely metal direction, the band has expanded the scope of their sound to encompass elements of progressive rock as well.  There is a very strong atmospheric component similar to Riverside, Porcupine Tree, and Pink Floyd but the heavier, metallic side of Opeth and Dream Theater is clearly present as well.Over the past two years Kingcrow has expanded their fan base with a European tour in support of Redemption and Jon Oliva as well as appearances at ProgPower Europe and ProgPower USA.  An announcement about 2013 US tour dates is imminent. 
    $13.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."After the failed experiment of Turbo, Judas Priest toned down the synths and returned to the basics, delivering a straight-ahead, much more typical Priest album with Ram It Down. The band's fan base was still devoted enough to consistently push each new album past the platinum sales mark, and perhaps that's part of the reason Ram It Down generally sounds like it's on autopilot. While there are some well-constructed songs, they tend toward the generic, and the songwriting is pretty lackluster overall, with the up-tempo title track easily standing out as the best tune here. And even though Ram It Down backed away from the territory explored on Turbo, much of the album still has a too-polished, mechanical-sounding production, especially the drums. Lyrically, Ram It Down is firmly entrenched in adolescent theatrics that lack the personality or toughness of Priest's best anthems, which -- coupled with the lack of much truly memorable music -- makes the record sound cynical and insincere, the lowest point in the Rob Halford era. Further debits are given for the cover of "Johnny B. Goode."" - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Shame US fans never got to see Eloy perform.  I'm still bummed about their Nearfest cancellation.  On the other hand we have this new 2CD live set to ease the pain.  It was recorded on the last German tour and features an expanded lineup.  This is the first live Eloy album since 1978's masterpiece "Eloy Live".  Material tends to concentrate on Silent Cries & Mighty Echoes to more recent times.  All in all its almost 2 1/2 hours long and complements the first live album to give you a good overview of the band's canon.  Highly recommended."When, after 11 years of complete abstinence, they brought out an album again in 2009 with "Visionary", it was greeted with astonishment. Most assumed that the band had taken their departure from the music business in 1998 with Ocean 2 "The Answer", especially as bandleader, Frank Bornemann, had always stressed that ELOY was a part of the musical culture of the 20th century and no longer fitted into the new millennium.However, he had probably not anticipated how much his band's music would continue to reverberate in the new millennium. The back catalogue reached six-digit sales figures with the remasters versions, and on the internet portals, the tribute to the German prog-rock legend accumulated in unexpected ways. Touched by this appreciation, and impressed by the many years of unremitting worldwide fan-power, the band re-formed, made up entirely from the musicians who had previously influenced the group's music as permanent members. The firm intent of properly saying 'thank you' for so much loyalty finally also brought the ultimate line-up back to the stage. With, for the first time, two guitarists, two keyboardists, bass, drums, two backing singers from the studio sessions and a solo vocalist for the highlights from "The Apocalypse" and "The Tides Return Forever" repertoire, they delivered an impressive retrospective of the band's history on stage. In the storm of enthusiasm every evening in almost consistently sold-out venues, some of the titles often exceeded the studio originals. Cheered on by a euphoric fanbase, the band often outdid themselves making recordings of phenomenal expressive power, which now find their way to the fans as the first and only live audio documentary since 1978. The unique atmosphere which accompanies the experience on stage resurrects the former Spirit of ELOY with emotion and passion, and this has finally led to the band giving this live documentary – offered as a double-CD in a high value 8-page digi-pack with a running time of over 140 minutes - a very special title: REINCARANTION ON STAGEDisc 11. Namaste2. Child Migration3. Paralized Civilization4. Mysterious Monolith5. Age of Insanity6. The Apocalypse7. Silhouette8. Poseidon's Creation9. Time to Turn10. The Sun Song11. Horizons12. IlluminationsDisc 21. Follow the Light2. Awakening of Consciousness3. The Tides Return Forever4. Ro Setau5. Mystery6. Decay of Logos7. Atlantis Agony8. The Bells of Notre Dame9. Thoughts
    $22.00
  • "On first listen, you could be forgiven for thinking that Helker are German: in fact, they hail from that renowned hotbed of heavy metal Argentina, with ‘Somewhere In The Circle’ being their fourth album but the first to be both recorded in English and gain an international release, thanks to a deal inked last year with AFM Records.However, the assumption that the five piece’s geographic origins lie in Germany, or even Italy, is a fair one to make, due to a number of factors – not least their collaboration with one Mat Sinner, who not only produced the album but also co-wrote all of the 11 tracks. Then, there’s the material itself, which evokes classic Helloween, especially, as well as the likes of Hammerfall, Primal Fear (vocalist Ralf Scheepers makes a guest appearance, along heavy metal mercenary Tim ‘Ripper’ Owens, on ‘Begging For Forgiveness’) and just about every other classic European power metal outfit.All the right elements are included – soaring guitar solos and harmonies, huge, catchy choruses and majestic vocals. Actually, let’s concentrate on the latter for a moment: Diego Valdez does have a powerful, impressive voice, with a delivery and style that is very reminiscent of the late Ronnie James Dio (perhaps a bit too closely imitative on the likes of ‘Modern Roman Circus’, ‘No Chance To Be Reborn’ and ‘Dreams’), Michael Kiske (check ‘Wake Up’ or ‘Ghosts From The Past’) and even Klaus Meine (as on ‘Flying’).Elsewhere, the musical performances are all powerful and impressive, delivering a collection of songs that don’t stray too far from the traditional power metal formulae but nevertheless do so in an efficient and tidy manner." - Planet Mosh
    $15.00
  • "To avoid any lingering confusion right from the outset,  you may already be aware of this band because AudioPlastik began life under a different name or names to be more precise. Both Alpha Flood and Brave New Sky were trialled before the trio settled on the name AudioPlastik. Whatever the name though, it’s a musical collaboration which will more than prick the ears of fans of progressive rock or metal music. The trio is fronted none other than Dec Burke, the vocalist for Darwin’s Radio and Frost* as well as being a well thought of solo artist in his own right. Dec also plays the guitar and is joined by the impressive duo of Simon Andersson (Darkwater, ex-Pain Of Salvation) and Threshold’s keyboardist Richard West. Being a fan of all of the names mentioned in the preceding sentences, I have naturally been very excited to hear the final product ever since a debut album was announced to see the light of day early this year.The album is due out in the very near future and goes by the title of ‘In The Head Of A Maniac’. With a title like this, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the content of this record might be a bizarre, challenging or even a wild schizophrenic beast. However, you’d be wrong, at least to a certain extent anyway. This is progressive music and as such, it does blend many ideas into its collective whole. But it is far from being impenetrable or a difficult listen.To be honest, the most difficult thing is to accurately describe the musical direction on ‘In The Head of a Maniac’. In itself it’s an absorbing listen full of wondrous aspects, one that is instantly likeable but ever more addictive as the number of spins increases. But to be more exact in order to offer a worthwhile review? Ok…If I was to try and sum this album up in a few words, I’d say it’s an absorbing blend of melodic progressive rock, metal and pop with rich cinematic overtones.Dealing with the latter aspect first, the cinematic, symphonic flavour can be heard right from the outset via the relatively brief instrumental opening. This is Richard West at his best, creating a piece of music which is subtly dramatic, emotive and pure film soundtrack fodder. In fact, much the same can be said of the even more dramatic ‘Traveller’ which is equally as enthralling and which could easily fit a suspense or action thriller.That said, West’s stamp is all over each of the thirteen compositions, bringing a rich elegance to proceedings just like he does with Threshold. Whether it’s via more subtle layers of atmospheric synths or more in-your-face modern-sounding embellishments, of which there are several (‘John Doe’) it always fits the song perfectly, providing a foundation of real depth and richness upon which all else is built.Next there’s the guitar playing of Burke and Andersson which is actually surprisingly heavy. Occasionally it is reminiscent in tone of numerous djent artists, particularly when the riffs chug in step with a rumbling bass (also courtesy of Andersson) and powerful drumming. ‘It Matters So Much’ illustrates this perfectly and is also a track that also greatly benefits from a rare and decadent lead guitar solo. This being prog, naturally many of the riffs play around with interesting, complicated tempos and time signatures but they are never complex for the sake of it and never detract from the essence of the songs. A prime example being ‘The Sound Of Isolation’ which contains a riff which befuddles my brain but which works in and around the simpler aspects of the song.One of the biggest strengths on this record however is its melodic sensibility. I mentioned earlier about the pop influences and its in the choruses that this is most noticeable. Just about every song has a hook or a melody that’s memorable. Some are immediate and others take a bit longer to work into the psyche. Regardless, they are there and many of them, alongside those modern programmed flourishes, lend the music that more mainstream feel. ‘Leave Me Here’ and the beautiful ‘Now’ for example, might not be out of place on mainstream popular radio. Elsewhere, ‘Bulletproof’ offers one of the most gorgeous choruses I’ve heard in recent times, ironic given that it’s also one of the heavier, busier tracks that packs a lot of light and shade as well as apparently disparate elements into its relatively short length. Oh and then there’s the stunning closer, ‘Distant Skies’ which pushes ‘Bulletproof’ very close, almost beating it depending on my mood when I listen.Then, to top things off, you’ve got the vocals of Burke. Those familiar with his other work with Frost* or Darwin’s Radio will know exactly what to expect and he doesn’t disappoint. Burke has a tone that’s very melodic and almost soothing but which also has a slightly rough, gritty edge to it that I really like. It means that the vocal delivery can fit both the softer, more introspective parts but which can also do justice to the heavier moments that require something a bit edgier vocally.As you can probably tell, I’m completely enamoured by this album. Almost imperceptibly, it has burrowed into my head and my heart and it refuses to let go. If your tastes dictate that you enjoy music that is rich and varied, deep and thoughtful, beautiful and genuinely unique, look no further than ‘In The Mind Of A Maniac’ by AudioPlastic. You won’t be disappointed." - Man Of Much Metal  
    $16.00
  • "Eden must be rumbling, its ground beginning to shatter as it is being constantly sliced by the profanity of an intense music heading closer and closer. Mankind was assumingly banished from the enchanted lands of upstairs without an option of returning, but the curse will be forever remembered, reminisced by those expatriated for generations, thus the creation of a sonic boom, a symphonic echo forged by the ancient sin, in order to redirect it back to where it came from. The creators have been quite proficient in their deeds, escalating their abilities for the shaping of the perfect “Symphony Of Sin”, this multinational formation is called EDEN’S CURSE. Actually, this isn’t the first time I was touched by the band’s enhanced multiformity as I had the chance to review their previous “Trinity” release. But with the upcoming “Symphony Of Sin”, again via AFM Records, EDEN’S CURSE underwent a slight change of figures. With vocalist Michael Eden out of the game, along with keyboardist Alessandro Del Vecchio, the remaining members sought out and found the Serbian soulful bliss of the young Nikola Mijic and the experience and abilities of Steve Williams (ex-POWER QUEST / ex-MERCURY RAIN / ex-DSG). Even with their reorganization, EDEN’S CURSE maintained their same sensitivity towards the melodic crust of both Rock and Metal, and I might even add that they enriched it this time around.The materialization of “Symphony Of Sin”, signified a slight change of proceedings within EDEN’S CURSE music. Nothing much a substantial impact of sorts, yet I felt as that this album tends towards the boundaries of AOR and Hard Rock rather towards the clutches of Heavy or Power Metal, thus making it less heavier or piercing, yet not without a lesser quality. Other than the classic influence of DIO, BLACK SABBATH and DOKKEN, particularly within Thorsten Koehne’s rocking riffery, it appears that the band took a closer step towards the catchy vibes of BALANCE OF POWER, PINK CREAM 69, SHAKRA, HOUSE OF LORDS, JADED HEART, COLDSPELL, EVIDENCE ONE and POWERWORLD. On the other hand, I found the energetic flex of STRATOVARIUS and Koehne’s guitar wizardry orientation of ex-STRATOVARIUS’s Timo Tolkki. Additionally, Mijic’s exquisite voice pattern, like a mixture of Jon Lynn Turner, Ian Gillian and Tony Martin seems to fit well with rockier songs and therefore the songwriting the musical direction was accordingly. “Symphony Of Sin”, in comparison to “Trinity”, consists of a fairly harmonic vibe, especially demonstrated on the choral vocals that were amazingly produced, which garnered the listening experience a fine edge of smoothness. There is nothing too cheesy or cheap, but a polished form of Hard N’ Heavy with a clear 80s ambiance, leaning on softer margins.“Unbreakable” and “Wings To Fly” are the opposite of modern day breakers, hook laden emotive rockers exercising the arts of old AOR, along with Pete Newdeck’s robust drumming efforts, taking on smoother turns, creating an anthem driven feel with such a fine elegance full of grace. “Devil in Disguise”, fulfilling the lust of those looking for a bite of intensity and exuberant guitar riffery, yet will find out that within this Heavy Metal chugger there is a sweet peak moment with an enticing chorus and sharp edged soloing. “Turn The Page” and “Where is the Love?” inflamed with its melodic sensation, riff revelations, corresponding between Hard Rock and Metal, and another enchanting display of Mijic’s soaring vocals. EDEN’S CURSE established a profound position for themselves, finding the right voice to lead them forward, and the exact musical vibe to follow through the next steps of their career. “Symphony Of Sin” is a quality product of an 80s admiration and fascination, yet also upgraded by the features and goods of a well attributed crew." - Metal Temple
    $15.00
  • "Oceans of Mountain fans discovered them by witnessing one of their roaring rock shows, and this one's a doozy, captured in Osaka in '73. Pappalardi/West/Mann/Schwartzberg set fire to staples like Mississsippi Queen; Theme from an Imaginary Western , and Never in My Life plus an epic (nearly 32-minute) Nantucket Sleighride . Raging guitar solos all around!"
    $5.00
  • Redemption is one of the leading progressive metal bands in the world today.  Formed in Los Angeles, California in 2000 by guitarist / keyboardist / songwriter Nicolas van Dyk, the band features legendary progressive metal vocalist Ray Alder of Fates Warning, as well as guitarist Bernie Versailles (Agent Steel), and the phenomenal rhythm section of Chris Quirarte (drums) and Sean Andrews (bass).Redemption’s combination of heaviness not usually found in progressive metal, irresistible melodies and emotional urgency has created a unique and resonant voice for this band that sets them apart from the many clones in the genre, and which has gained them the attention of fans, critics and musicians.Through the band’s first three studios CDs (2002s self-titled first release, 2005’s The Fullness of Time, and 2007’s The Origins of Ruin), Redemption gained a loyal fanbase and garnered rave reviews worldwide from critics, who describe Redemption’s music as“one of the best progressive metal acts to emerge in the past decade” – DPRP“magical aura and incredible songwriting” – BLABBERMOUTH“it's powerful, catchy, enslaving, technical; it's the whole bunch” – LORDS OF METAL“the new star on the US prog-metal sky” – SQUEALER ROCKSAfter touring in support of Dream Theater and documenting at headlining show at tour’s end entitled Frozen in the Moment, the band returned to the studio to release 2009’s Snowfall on Judgment Day and 2011’s This Mortal Coil.Performing in support of that record, in 2012 Redemption co-headlined the world-famous ProgPower Festival in Atlanta, where the band recorded a unique show featuring nearly 80 minutes of material and staged with complementary visuals that drive home the compelling emotional impact of this band.   That performance is now being released as a CD/DVD set with additional bonus material through Sensory Records, the band’s original label.  From fan favorites such as the never-before-performed Parker’s Eyes to the crushing emotional weight of Stronger than Death, Redemption’s performance captured the special ability of its music to deeply connect with fans.  In the words of one concert-goer, Redemption’s show “was definitely the most exhausting, personal and emotional musical experience I’ve ever had.” 
    $17.00
  • "When was the last time you saw anyone in corpse paint smile? It's further proof of their flair for showmanship that two of the "slick perverted wraiths" in Cradle of Filth's 2004 publicity shot are flashing the pearly whites. The longstanding English group was never devoted purely to the black metal aesthetic; Dani Filth and his minions flaunted decadence amid their gravestones, and supported the usual atonal growls with the melodic gallop of metal traditionalism. This approach has always assured the listener a little entertainment with his fear, and Nymphetamine (what a name!) is no different. The laughably overwrought novellas of Damnation and a Day are gone -- Cradle's focusing on songs, not suites. Does this have anything to do with the band's new home at Roadrunner? The label is very good at encouraging the music to say hard while working to make it marketable, too; witness its co-branded Headbanger's Ball compilations. Whatever the reasons, Nymphetamine is an extremely entertaining album. Filth's vocals shift between roof-of-mouth-tearing screams and primordial yowls; coupled with the oft-melodic guitar lines, Cradle can at times resemble any of the slogan T-shirted American post-hardcore units (Used, for example). Thank the dark lord then that they don't forget their place. We don't listen to these albums to empathize with Dani's pain; we listen because they sound like a play list on Pinhead's iPod. After a typically spooky intro -- picture black-robed choirs and gargoyles coming to life -- Cradle drops the hammer on "Gilded C***" (you figure it out), a muscular rocker with wind-whipping time shifts and lyrics you can actually understand ("My preference leans to killing you quickly/Scissored in the gizzard...."). Most of the album plays dueling power metal guitars masterfully off a slower or more gothic choruses. "Absinthe With Faust," for example, departs from its Metallica-type speed for a firelight reflecting in the catacombs interlude. Hello, my pretty. Other highlights include the rapid-fire "Medusa and Hemlock," a guest appearance from Leaves' Eyes chanteuse Liv Kristine Espenaes Krull, and "Filthy Little Secret," which is utterly cinematic in its orchestral, choral, and ultimately explosive scope." - Allmusic Guide
    $6.00
  • ""Return to Desolation" is the third album from Canadian band Moonlyght. The album features 9 tracks of progressive dark metal with folk elements, melody, symphonics & lots of atmosphere. Clocking in at 71 minutes this is Moonlyght's grandiose masterpiece! There is literally something for every metal fan on this album. For fans of Barren Earth, Ensiferum, Ne Obliviscaris, Amorphis & Wintersun!"
    $14.00
  • New album seems to be a touch mellower than in the past but only slightly. Dead Soul Tribe is not about complexity - it's about groove, rhythm and emotions. Devon Graves continues to write songs with great hooks and riffs. You want find any of the complexity that characterized Psychotic Waltz but this is targeted more for the heart than the head.
    $7.00
  • "It has become patently unfair to review a Luca Turilli creation as a “metal album.” No matter what you call it… “cinematic metal,” “symphonic metal,” “classical metal” – Turilli composes musicscapes beyond comparison. While he will never be held to the unattainable standard of a modern Mozart and Beethoven – the giants who receive 100% critical acclaim whether deserved or not – Luca can easily draw comparisons to modern composers like John Williams, Hans Zimmer and Jerry Goldsmith.With his composition company created, his ability to mix both old world classical and modern/new world classical with metallic elements is unprecedented in heavy metal. This music transcends the metal world and thrusts deeply into mainstream music and movie soundtrack lore. On “Prometheus – Symphonia Ignis Divinus” – Turilli uses both dark and light elements, a real combination of “Prophets of the Lost Eclipse” and “The Infinite Wonders of Creation,” to create a stunning masterpiece that trumps the impossibly towering “Ascending to Infinity.”It is literally pointless for fans that do not enjoy meticulously orchestrated cinematic metal to run out to buy “Prometheus,” so just stop right here. Long time Luca fans, read on! Imagine, if you will, being on board the Hollywood backlot tram tour, only its much cooler than you can imagined. As you pass by various sets for movies like “Solomon” (with “King Solomon and the 72 Names of God”) “Lord of the Rings” (with “One Ring to Rule Them All”), “Valhalla Rising” (with “Yggdrasil”) – you are whisked away on a musical journey that is a rich and pure as the breathtaking mountains, valleys, lakes and oceans. Luca creates music that conjures images teaming with life that flash on every note, which is as extraordinary as the breathtaking compositions themselves.After the accident that nearly took the hand and career of guitarist Dominique “Dodo” Leurquin, his presence on “Prometheus” is a both relieving and required. It’s also a welcome sight to see drummer Alex Landenburg (21 Octayne/Mekong Delta), who joined the band before the release of “Ascending Into Infinity” in 2012, but who hasn’t played on a release until “Prometheus.” A favorite skin basher for many years, it’s a triumphant display from one of the best and hardest working in the business. Sound wise…albums do not get much more pristine.With Luca at the helm along with his team of Sebastian Roeder (recording) and Christoph Stickel (mastering) – “Prometheus” is a sonic jewel. Having freed himself from the binding storylines of the pre-split Rhapsody/Rhapsody of Fire days, Luca seems bent on raising the bar with everything he does – becoming part opera, part soundtrack, part metal, part symphony.Where tracks like “Rosenkreuz,” “Prometheus” and “Yggdrasil” ratchet up the heaviness that metalheads expect (notably those fans who have become disillusioned at the orchestrated distractions away from guitar), other songs bring a beautiful “non-metal” element, best represented through “Il Tempo Degli Dei” – which has quickly grown to be the go-to favorite after a mediocre first listen (it sounds immensely happy) – and “Notturno,” the operatic ballad showcasing uber-talented vocalists Alessandro Conti and Fench soprano Emilie Ragni.Once again, the album’s keystone monument is “Of Michael the Archangel and Lucifer’s Fall” – this time with the second part, subtitled “Codex Nemesis.” Remembering greatness levels reaching stupid proportions on “Ascending to Infinity,” the second part matches but comes from a different melodic angle.Overall, “Prometheus - Symphonia Ignis Divinus” ties elements from all of Luca’s previous efforts – with a heavy dose of “Prophet of the Last Eclipse,” nods to the Dreamquest release “Lost Horizons,” and a victory lap from “Ascending to Infinity.” If you are a fan of Turilli, there is little doubt you will gush all over “Prometheus.” If you find the cinematic, operatic and symphonic elements a little too over the top for your metal cravings, then steer clear. One thing is certain, the only composer on earth who can top Luca Turilli is the man himself.Highs: High expectations realized from the world's best composer.Lows: With Luca's Rhapsody, either you find it amazing or way too over the top to be respectable.Bottom line: "Prometheus" may seem like an "Ascending to Infinity" victory lap, but it goes way deeper than what you hear on the first listen." - Metal Underground
    $15.00