Future Sequence: Live At The Fideltorium (Blu-Ray/CD)

"I am no stranger to the awesome might of Between the Buried and Me. Back when I first started writing for MetalNuhUh, as the scant old school among you may remember, I endured a not-so-sexy injury bike accident which resulted in a broken shoulder, and it was shortly after said injury that I first got to witness the glory of a BTBAM show, on Halloween no less. This was back in the Colors days (probably still my favorite offering from the band), and I’ll be damned if the music — and a handful of whiskeys, as well as the cute flirty smile of the bartender — didn’t make me wanna throw caution to the wind and fight my way through the pit with a broken shoulder.

Thankfully I restrained myself – hard to find the motivation when some poor bastard was carried out of said pit with a protruding ankle bone sticking out of his leg – but the real lesson to take away here is that this is a band with the ability to conjure up such a wicked level of excitement with a stupendous live performance…

CUT TO:
Several years and a couple noodley records later, my perception of BTBAM’s current music had become slightly underwhelmed, but catching the band earlier this year on tour with Intronaut and Deafheaven reminded me just how sickly tight the playing is.  And this is a similar feeling I get when watching new Blu-ray DVD release Future Sequence: Live at the Fidelitorium; to see these dudes crank it out live reminds me every time where the magic lies.

Sure, it’s easy to dismiss some of the tunes as a bit too proggy, ostentatious, melodramatic even — there are several decidedly clowny video game/carnival/musical theater-inspired moments (which actually makes quite a bit of sense since the group recently alluded that it will be embarking on a journey to create a rock opera), but these guys are such gifted individual musicians that truly elevate to a whole other level together that no matter how you may feel about any of their material, the impression they leave will drop your jaw every time.

In watching Live at the Fidelitorium, as seeing the band live, it’s almost impossible not to fawn over BTBAM’s tightness. There are several moments that sound pretty impossible, but wait a second—I just saw five humans make that happen…  Drummer Blake Richardson is a beast who straddles the magnificent line between heavy hitting and ripping jazzy groove chops, the guitarists and bassist display jaw-dropping dexterity for days, and Tommy Rogers once again astonishes with his pearly singing timbre that somehow escalates into one of the most br00tal growls I’ve ever seen from a little dude.

And this particular performance also features some additional players, special guests including bassist Dan Briggs’ saxomophone cohort from fusion outfit Trioscapes, a tuba player, a string quartet, and a glockenspiel/marimba player.  For some reason, these guest performances are presented in such a matter-of-fact way (cutting into their footage all of a sudden when their parts drop in) that it’s hard to get a sense of where these additional players are situated geographically. One assumes that they are somewhere in the same studio as Tommy and the boyz, but from a directorial/editing perspective it’s difficult to tell where they are are situated.

Overall it’s a real pleasure to watch such a simple, barebones performance from such a crazy band — aside from the extras (some additional pretty pointless “behind-the-scenes” footage documenting the studio setup and some interesting interviews explaining the impetus for the DVD), Future Sequence: Live at the Fidelitorium is a mostly no-frills studio recording, meant to show the band in a subdued, intimate setting without the distractions of a crowd or the chaos of a live show. And it’s definitely a treat to see the guys do their thing. Any BTBAM fanboy (or fangirl, but c’mon—let’s get real here) will be psyched to lay eyes on this DVD, but I’d be pretty surprised if anyone new to the band was extremely bowled over by this largely ho-hum studio “concert” setting. At this point in such a killer band’s impressive career that probably doesn’t matter much though; it’s just nice to sit back and watch BTBAM do its thing." - Metal Sucks

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • "To avoid any lingering confusion right from the outset,  you may already be aware of this band because AudioPlastik began life under a different name or names to be more precise. Both Alpha Flood and Brave New Sky were trialled before the trio settled on the name AudioPlastik. Whatever the name though, it’s a musical collaboration which will more than prick the ears of fans of progressive rock or metal music. The trio is fronted none other than Dec Burke, the vocalist for Darwin’s Radio and Frost* as well as being a well thought of solo artist in his own right. Dec also plays the guitar and is joined by the impressive duo of Simon Andersson (Darkwater, ex-Pain Of Salvation) and Threshold’s keyboardist Richard West. Being a fan of all of the names mentioned in the preceding sentences, I have naturally been very excited to hear the final product ever since a debut album was announced to see the light of day early this year.The album is due out in the very near future and goes by the title of ‘In The Head Of A Maniac’. With a title like this, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the content of this record might be a bizarre, challenging or even a wild schizophrenic beast. However, you’d be wrong, at least to a certain extent anyway. This is progressive music and as such, it does blend many ideas into its collective whole. But it is far from being impenetrable or a difficult listen.To be honest, the most difficult thing is to accurately describe the musical direction on ‘In The Head of a Maniac’. In itself it’s an absorbing listen full of wondrous aspects, one that is instantly likeable but ever more addictive as the number of spins increases. But to be more exact in order to offer a worthwhile review? Ok…If I was to try and sum this album up in a few words, I’d say it’s an absorbing blend of melodic progressive rock, metal and pop with rich cinematic overtones.Dealing with the latter aspect first, the cinematic, symphonic flavour can be heard right from the outset via the relatively brief instrumental opening. This is Richard West at his best, creating a piece of music which is subtly dramatic, emotive and pure film soundtrack fodder. In fact, much the same can be said of the even more dramatic ‘Traveller’ which is equally as enthralling and which could easily fit a suspense or action thriller.That said, West’s stamp is all over each of the thirteen compositions, bringing a rich elegance to proceedings just like he does with Threshold. Whether it’s via more subtle layers of atmospheric synths or more in-your-face modern-sounding embellishments, of which there are several (‘John Doe’) it always fits the song perfectly, providing a foundation of real depth and richness upon which all else is built.Next there’s the guitar playing of Burke and Andersson which is actually surprisingly heavy. Occasionally it is reminiscent in tone of numerous djent artists, particularly when the riffs chug in step with a rumbling bass (also courtesy of Andersson) and powerful drumming. ‘It Matters So Much’ illustrates this perfectly and is also a track that also greatly benefits from a rare and decadent lead guitar solo. This being prog, naturally many of the riffs play around with interesting, complicated tempos and time signatures but they are never complex for the sake of it and never detract from the essence of the songs. A prime example being ‘The Sound Of Isolation’ which contains a riff which befuddles my brain but which works in and around the simpler aspects of the song.One of the biggest strengths on this record however is its melodic sensibility. I mentioned earlier about the pop influences and its in the choruses that this is most noticeable. Just about every song has a hook or a melody that’s memorable. Some are immediate and others take a bit longer to work into the psyche. Regardless, they are there and many of them, alongside those modern programmed flourishes, lend the music that more mainstream feel. ‘Leave Me Here’ and the beautiful ‘Now’ for example, might not be out of place on mainstream popular radio. Elsewhere, ‘Bulletproof’ offers one of the most gorgeous choruses I’ve heard in recent times, ironic given that it’s also one of the heavier, busier tracks that packs a lot of light and shade as well as apparently disparate elements into its relatively short length. Oh and then there’s the stunning closer, ‘Distant Skies’ which pushes ‘Bulletproof’ very close, almost beating it depending on my mood when I listen.Then, to top things off, you’ve got the vocals of Burke. Those familiar with his other work with Frost* or Darwin’s Radio will know exactly what to expect and he doesn’t disappoint. Burke has a tone that’s very melodic and almost soothing but which also has a slightly rough, gritty edge to it that I really like. It means that the vocal delivery can fit both the softer, more introspective parts but which can also do justice to the heavier moments that require something a bit edgier vocally.As you can probably tell, I’m completely enamoured by this album. Almost imperceptibly, it has burrowed into my head and my heart and it refuses to let go. If your tastes dictate that you enjoy music that is rich and varied, deep and thoughtful, beautiful and genuinely unique, look no further than ‘In The Mind Of A Maniac’ by AudioPlastic. You won’t be disappointed." - Man Of Much Metal  
    $16.00
  • HDCD remastered digipak with 3 bonus tracks."As the second long-player by the Grateful Dead, Anthem of the Sun (1968) pushed the limits of both the music as well as the medium. General dissatisfaction with their self-titled debut necessitated the search for a methodology to seamlessly juxtapose the more inspired segments of their live performances with the necessary conventions of a single LP. Since issuing their first album, the Dead welcomed lyricist Robert Hunter into the fold -- freeing the performing members to focus on the execution and taking the music to the next level. Another addition was second percussionist Mickey Hart, whose methodical timekeeping would become a staple in the Dead's ability to stop on the proverbial rhythmic dime. Likewise, Tom Constanten (keyboards) added an avant-garde twist to the proceedings with various sonic enhancements that were more akin to John Cage and Karlheinz Stockhausen than anything else coming from the burgeoning Bay Area music scene. Their extended family also began to incorporate folks like Dan Healy -- whose non-musical contributions and innovations ranged from concert PA amplification to meeting the technical challenges that the band presented off the road as well. On this record Healy's involvement cannot be overstated, as the band were essentially given carte blanche and simultaneous on-the-job training with regards to the ins and outs of the still unfamiliar recording process. The idea to create an aural pastiche from numerous sources -- often running simultaneously -- was a radical concept that allowed consumers worldwide to experience a simulated Dead performance firsthand. One significant pattern which began developing saw the band continuing to refine the same material that they were concurrently playing live night after night prior to entering the studio. The extended "That's It for the Other One" suite is nothing short of a psychedelic roller coaster. The wild ride weaves what begins as a typical song into several divergent performances -- taken from tapes of live shows -- ultimately returning to the home base upon occasion, presumably as a built-in reality check. Lyrically, Bob Weir (guitar/vocals) includes references to their 1967 pot bust ("...the heat came 'round and busted me for smiling on a cloudy day") as well as the band's spiritual figurehead Neal Cassidy ("...there was Cowboy Neal at the wheel on a bus to never ever land"). Although this version smokes from tip to smouldering tail, the piece truly developed a persona all its own and became a rip-roaring monster in concert. The tracks "New Potato Caboose" and Weir's admittedly autobiographically titled "Born Cross-Eyed" are fascinatingly intricate side trips that had developed organically during the extended work's on-stage performance life. "Alligator" is a no-nonsense Ron "Pigpen" McKernan workout that motors the second extended sonic collage on Anthem of the Sun. His straight-ahead driving blues ethos careens headlong into the Dead's innate improvisational psychedelia. The results are uniformly brilliant as the band thrash and churn behind his rock-solid lead vocals. Musically, the Dead's instrumental excursions wind in and out of the primary theme, ultimately ending up in the equally frenetic "Caution (Do Not Stop on Tracks)." Although the uninitiated might find the album unnervingly difficult to follow, it obliterated the pretension of the post-Sgt. Pepper's "concept album" while reinventing the musical parameters of the 12" LP medium. [The expanded and remastered edition included in the Golden Road (1965-1973) (2001) box set contains a live performance from August 23, 1968, at the Shrine in Los Angeles. This miniset features an incendiary medley of "Alligator" and "Caution (Do Not Stop on Tracks)" concluding with over four minutes of electronic feedback.]" - Allmusic Guide
    $6.00
  • Remastered edition of this great 2CD live album features loads of bonus tracks. Disc 2 is the complete live recording of The Snow Goose - apparently containing the original Andy Ward drum tracks as opposed to the previously released version which featured overdubbed drums. Still great either way.
    $14.00
  • Doom metal as a genre seems to have been fairly dormant for the past decade.  Years ago we offered a CD which featured a collection of demos by a defunct Swedish band called Sorcerer.  The band reformed in 2010 and have finally released their first real album after all these years.  The band is fronted by the great ex-Lions Share vocalist Andy Engberg who went on to work with a ton of bands over the years.  Doom pretty much follows a formulaic approach and Sorcerer doesn't really deviate from the tried and true very much.  If you are a fan of Candlemass, Trouble, and of course Black Sabbath this one will be right in your wheelhouse.  Highly recommended. 
    $13.00
  • Woodpecker is the debut release from singularly named Swedish vocalist AnnaMy (her spelling not mine).  Its a gorgeous album.  This is beautifully recorded gentle, melodic psychedelic folk.  Plenty of electricity here - most notably on electric guitar courtesy of Reine Fiske.  Undercurrents of flute and organ spice up the mix but the focus is on AnnaMy's stunning voice.  The overall sound pays homage to the greats of the 70s.  Think in terms of Trees, Mellow Candle, Caedmon, and Vashti Bunyan.  This one is a real grower.  Highly recommended.
    $16.00
  • "For composer and keyboard player Carl Westholm humanity's future is bleak, and ends in death. The apocalypse is at hand, and Westholm's Jupiter Society tells its inevitable and fateful story in the third effort From Endangered to Extinction. Again Westholm is helped by members of several Scandi bands including Carptree, Krux, Candlemass, Soilwork, Opeth, and Evergrey.Needless to say, with the bleak concept, this is a dark and despairing album, from lyrics to music, with Westholm's ominous synth layers establishing the foundation. Lyrically, the story revolves more around the invaders and destroyers of the earth, led by the Queen of Armageddon, possibly aided by some satanic element, mentioned in the song Invasion, rather than the people of earth.The latter, the people of earth, get some reference in the last three songs, but with little hope. The song Fight back is crushed in the vice of No Survivors and Defeat. It's not good day on Planet Earth. And this is where Westholm's song composition comes to the fore. The music intentionally propels the frustration, devastation, and defeat of humanity in both tone and power. In other words, this dark and bleak story gets played out in a proper musical context and, therefore, makes From Endangered to Extinction creative and engaging. But considering the subject matter, again, entertaining may become a highly contested moot point. Recommended." - Dangerdog.comThird album in the futuristic prog metal series from Carl Westholm.  You may know him from his involvement from Carptree, Krux, and Candlemass.  Westholm always puts together an interesting cast of musicians for these projects.  This time he draws from bands like Krux, Carptree, Candlemass, Soilwork, and Evergrey.  Most notable are the great Mats Leven (as one of a few lead vocalists) and Leif Edling of Candlemass.  Intense apocalyptic stuff with a cyber metal angle to it.  Highly recommended. 
    $15.00
  • "The vast riches lying within the reach of Google have included a lot of bands I’ve discovered by typing long strings of words bookended by “metal” in an effort to root out underground music of varying sub-genres that I might enjoy. Forum posts often proved most fruitful, those splendid user-generated gifts of musical knowledge. One particular band I heard mentioned glowingly a few years back via a forum post was Serdce.They are a Minsk-based group and one whose 2004 album, Cyberly, was being billed as an unknown classic. I take comments like that with a pound of fucking salt. Yet it turned out to be true. So it gave me much pleasure that Blood Music worked with Islander here at NCS to premiere music from Serdce’s soon-to-be-released record, Timelessness. It was doubly nice that Heavy Blog Is Heavy began to post about them as well with yet another song premierel, because Serdce are a quirky progressive death metal band worth checking out — and worthy of that tag.I admit to feeling jarred when I first heard this album. It’s a big shift from their last record, 2009’s The Alchemy Of Harmony, a record I worship and regard as a masterpiece, although the changes make sense because they’ve been expanding toward a more prog-metal-focused sound with each release. As this was always a big part of their style, the shift away from calculating, mid-paced death metal into lighter Cynic-focused realms works phenomenally well. And it’s not as confined or as prog-by-numbers as you might think.he fusion side of this record isn’t a minor flirtation, like most of your average jazz-inflected metal dubbed progressive. In reality, it makes up the majority of the album’s sound and journey — and it’s a dense and dream-decorated journey at that. While the style on display in Timelessness is brilliant and multi-faceted to these ears, it may not be aggressive enough for the tastes of some people. For those in that camp, I urge you to examine their prior albums.That observation is not intended as an indictment or an implication that this new album is not as good as their past work — to the contrary, I would venture to say this is Serdce’s most eclectic and strongest album yet. I merely mean to say that it’s of a more airy and progressive nature and that not all metalheads may be open-minded enough to appreciate it.Serdce have been creating Meshuggah groove-gliding influenced death metal long before most of the pack who followed that lead, and they continue to do it better than most. But for those who are groove-averse, that’s far from the totality of what they have to offer. Throughout Timelessness you will hear a lot of piano playing and orchestral/carnival-esque synths, and in addition, the vocals are primarily sung this time around. Overall, the strong Cynic-vibe of the record comes not only from the riffing and fusion elements; the effusive, prominent, and exploratory bass playing brings that comparison to mind as well.Huge artistic shifts in a band’s sound remain a double-edged sword, usually causing long-time fans to quarrel for and against such transformations in equal measure. Serdce have skillfully navigated these tricky waters and come out the other side a totally different, yet no less intriguing group. Timelessness doesn’t last forever, yet it contains innumerable timelessly memorable moments within its titanic, fluid, multi-part songs. Jump on the bandwagon or crawl in the dust – Timelessness will find an interested and eager audience either way — though I urge you to give it a chance and get on board." - No Clean Singing
    $16.00
  • The release of 2012's critically acclaimed Trouble With Machines ushered in an exciting era for Chicago-based Progressive Rock band District 97. In 2013, the band toured both Europe and the US with legendary bassist and vocalist John Wetton (King Crimson/UK/Asia), which was documented on 2014's live release, One More Red Night: Live in Chicago. 2013 also saw the band nominated for a Limelight Award by Prog Magazine. Rather than rest on their laurels, District 97 took to the studio in 2014 to record the new material they'd been honing at home and on the road. The resulting album, In Vaults, continues and accelerates the upward trajectory of great songwriting and incredible musicianship that's been evident since the band's 2010 debut, Hybrid Child. One listen perfectly illustrates why John Wetton says, “I've said it before, and I maintain that D97 is the best young progressive band around right now. Gifted players, great material, and a brilliant, charismatic singer in Leslie Hunt."In addition to its evocative and powerful songwriting and performances, In Vaults features the immaculate mixing of Rich Mouser (Spock's Beard, Transatlantic), mastering by Grammy winning engineer Bob Katz and the stunning imagery of Björn Gooßes of Killustraitions. 
    $13.00
  • "BLACKCUBE is a French Progressive Metal band. Amongst their main influences are Symphony X, Queen, Dream Theater and Deep Purple, but they take pride in building their own musical identity, which ranges from psychedelic and relaxing moments to sections of catchy heavy-prog. Exploring many changes in time signature and arrangement, the band strives to present different moods within single tracks while preserving its substance beyond the soulessness of mere technical exhibition.Formed in 2004, BlackCube was at first dedicated to covers and went through numerous changes in its line-up. It was not until the summer of 2008 that the sextet found its current line-up when a full-time singer joined the band. The band wrote four songs at that time and went on to record them, pressing with their own money their first EP.Quickly it appeared that it was not enough for them and they went on writing a full repertoire with the purpose of not having to play covers at their concerts anymore to fill in the gaps. They wanted an entirely original setlist.Within the writing process, each of the six members of BlackCube adds his two cents. The direction is simple yet demanding: the members badly want songs they take pleasure in playing and listening to. The lyrics revolve around many different themes, including cultural, poetical, and metaphysical subjects with an inclination towards a certain form of onirism."
    $14.00
  • Third album from a band that is essentially a mash up of members from Sieges Even, Sun Caged and Dreamscape.  Their music carries on very much in the style of the later Sieges Even albums.  In other words progressive rock that leans towards the heavier side of the spectrum.  Rush, Rabin-era Yes, Saga, and Dream Theater come to mind as influences.  Quite melodic and if you are so inclined you'll hear some incredible chops from guitarist Markus Steffen.  The band corraled Stream Of Passion's Marcela Bovio for a guest vocal appearance, dueting with Arno Menses.
    $17.00
  • DGM has been cranking out albums for years and with all the lineup changes they go through, somehow the music gets better and better.  Forget that Russell Allen and Jorn Viggo Lofstad guest on the album - sure that's cool.  More important are the facts that vocalist Mark Basile is rock solid and the band has come up with a perfect blend of melodicism, heaviness and proginess. (not sure that is a word).  This one makes all the right moves. File under: AWESOME!   Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Gothic metal is alive and well in The Netherlands.  For whatever reason this is the part of Europe where this genre exploded with a host of bands and many of them are still around.  A lot of them evolved, moving away from the "beauty and the beast" style vocal presentation (think Within Temptation and Delain).  Magion is one of those bands that clings a bit to the traditional B&B sound started by bands like After Forever and Epica.  They happen to do it well.  Its clear that these two bands are big influences on them.  The band is fronted by Myrthe van Beest, who has a beautiful voice.  The male grunts are kept to a minimum, but they crop up a bit.  This is the traditional larger than life symphonic sound - its what this style calls for and Magion deliver it in spades.  If you are a fan of the genre (I am), this one is a big hanging curve ball just waiting for you to crush it.  Highly recommended. 
    $11.00
  • "Countdown To Revenge is album number five from Italian metallers Hollow Haze, a band who’ve been rattling out grandiose metal since 2003 but never getting the recognition they deserved. Mind you, gigs with German metal kings Accept certainly did them more good than harm, and this 11-track affair comes straight out of the box writhing like a metallic serpent, bolstered by the venomous vocals of Fabio Lione (Rhapsody Of Fire / Vision Divine).This is the first Hollow Haze platter to showcase the soaring talents of renowned frontman Lione, who replaces Alex Sonato, the singer on the band’s last two records, including the critically acclaimed Poison In Black (2012). For me, Lione is a marked improvement on Sonato, having a far greater and certainly more epic range for this style of powerful, majestic metal.This sort of metal can be an acquired taste due to its orchestral drama and polished feel. Hollow Haze, among numerous others (often European), are certainly one of the more adequate bands carving out this type of vast, melodic metal landscape. Any fan of hard-hitting metal should certainly give this record a spin as well, though.Firstly – and revisiting that vocal style – we’re hearing a set of lungs that combines the glorious heights of Ronnie James Dio and Bruce Dickinson (Iron Maiden) with a more modern, epic range. These strengths are complimented by the clean orchestrations of Antarktica and the Wintermoon Orchestra which, rightly so, give the platter an icy, clinical feel as Nick Savio’s guitars chisel out those huge valleys of sound.Storming in after a brief orchestral intro (‘Room 212’), album opener ‘Watching In Silence’ adopts all the theatrical nuances one would expect from such heroic metal. Hollow Haze have always been an ambitious band, keen to tell their tales by way of lush arrangements and stately dynamics. The band keeps the drama going with the pacey ‘Still Alive’, a track which combines classical preparations with a thrashy drum and ominous guitar chug.Clearly Fabio Lione has found his fiery home with Hollow Haze, his voice slipping in without trace of any cracks as ‘No Rest For The Angels’ sweeps into the room, evoking images of grand halls and luxurious tapestries unfolding. It’s the sort of track that would need to be heard to be believed live; the solos are punchy, the drums racy and again the vocals soaring into the zenith – Lione aided by Rick Altzi (At Vance / Masterplan / ex-Thunderstone) – to create another vast landscape of sound.With this type of album, it’s always difficult to pick out a favourite track because there is always a conceptual feel about proceedings due to the textures and overlying drama. For instance, ‘Life Has No Meaning’ – one of the more melodically subtle tracks on the opus – is far removed from the pounding eight-minute title track, but both songs are testament to a band and its ability to create moods and sprawling pastures.There are certainly sceptics within the metal fraternity who would deem this sort of heavy metal as being over the top in its quest for atmosphere. I can see where they’d be coming from, but in small doses bands such as Hollow Haze need to be experienced. After all, how can one fault the reflective symphonies of ‘Il Tempo del Fuoco’ or the Helloween-styled power metal soar of ‘A Fading Angel’s Life’? It’s metal at its purest, metal which doesn’t rely on anything remotely evil or weighty to deliver its message.Hollow Haze may be stuck within hair metal pomp and goth-laced histrionics and theatre, but for some this is what makes metal such a tour de force. Hats off to mix-master Sascha Paeth (Avantasia) for giving Countdown To Revenge such a clean, yet furious sound, and let’s hope Hollow Haze keep hold of Fabio Lione – this guy has added an extra dimension to that already flourishing landscape." - Metal Forces Magazine
    $15.00
  • New album clocks in near 80 minutes. No insanely long epics and the album is probably all the better for it. About as proggy as these guys have ever gotten.
    $9.00