Angel's Cry 20th Anniversary Tour (Blu-Ray)

SKU: 0209122ERE
Label:
Edel/Ear Music
Format:
BLU-RAY
Region:
Region 0
Category:
Power Metal
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Brazilian melodic metallers ANGRA celebrated the 20th anniversary of the release of their 1993 debut album, "Angels Cry", with a special concert on August 25 at HSBC Brasil in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The show, which was recorded for a DVD, featured guest appearances by Tarja Turunen (NIGHTWISH) and Uli Jon Roth (SCORPIONS).

ANGRA's setlist was as follows:

01. Angels Cry
02. Nothing to Say
03. Waiting Silence
04. Lisbon
05. Time
06. Millennium Sun (intro w/ Kiko Loureiro on keyboards)
07. Winds of Destination (intersection w/ Kiko Loureiro on keyboards)
08. Gentle Change
09. The Voice Commanding You (Rafael Bittencourt on vocals)
10. Late Redemption
11. Silence and Distance (intro w/ Kiko Loureiro on keyboards)

Acoustic set

12. Reaching Horizons (Rafael Bittencourt on vocals)
13. Unholy Wars / Caça e Caçador (Rafael Bittencourt and Kiko Loureiro on vocals)
14. A Monster in Her Eyes (Rafael Bittencourt and Kiko Loureiro on vocals)
15. Make Believe (Rafael Bittencourt and Kiko Loureiro on vocals)

Encore:

16. No Pain for the Dead (with Familia Lima on strings)
17. Stand Away (Tarja Turunen on vocals and Familia Lima on strings)
18. Wuthering Heights (Kate Bush cover) (Tarja Turunen on vocals and Uli Jon Roth on guitar)
19. Evil Warning (Amílcar Christófaro on drums)

Encore 2:

20. Unfinished Allegro (Familia Lima on strings)
21. Carry On
22. Rebirth
23. The Sails Of Charon (SCORPIONS cover) (Uli Jon Roth on guitar and Rafael Bittencourt on vocals)
24. In Excelsis
25. Nova Era
 

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