You Lost Me At Hello (Digipak)

I stumbled on this band's debut, Cowboy Music, and they blew me away. It's a wild free for all guitar/bass/drums power trio that runs the gamut of free playing to metal skronk. The band has moved over to Rune Grammofon - expect more of the same!


"This is the second full-length release by Norway's Bushman's Revenge (Even Helte Hermansen, Gard Nilssen, Rune Nergaard). You Lost Me At Hello shows a distinct development from their debut Cowboy Music (Jazzaway, 2007). Founded by Hermansen and Nilssen in 2003 in their hometown of Skien, a couple of hours from Oslo, the trio aim to combine the jazz/improv background of the rhythm section with the rock/metal background of leader, composer and guitarist Hermansen to create their own expressive music inspired by names like Black Sabbath and Jimi Hendrix as well as Ornette Coleman and Albert Ayler. Hermansen is also a member of such diverse groups as Shining and Solveig Slettahjell's Slow Motion Quintet. Nergaard is from the northern town of Bodø and also plays in Humvee and the Eirik Hegdal Quartet, while Nilssen can be found in Puma, Humvee and Lord Kelvin. Both have a background at the Jazz Academy in Trondheim, breeding ground for musicians such as Arve Henriksen, Ståle Storløkken, Nils Petter Molvær, and many more. Musically, You Lost Me At Hello has an untamed energy, showing a looser and rougher side than the debut, yet with a more focused road-map towards free exploration. The production is quite heavy with a dark and dirty side to it, and within the Rune Grammofon catalog, this record is probably most comparable to Scorch Trio and Motorpsycho. Metal crunch, bass meanderings, free jazz space-drums, anthemic riffs, and bursts of scrawl and fire, Bushman's Revenge will lay to waste all other contenders."

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    $14.00
  • Submarine Silence is a side project from Moongarden's Cristiano Roversi.  The bands first album was released 12 years ago on Mellow Records.  It was an instrumental album that paid a huge debt to early Genesis.  This low awaited follow up album is cut from a similar cloth but it does feature vocals.  Most of the band is fleshed out with other members of Moongarden and Mangala Vallis.  Vocals are sung by Mirko Ravenoldi, who frankly I'm not familiar with.  He sings in English and truth be told he's a much better guitarist than singer.  Luckily the album features long swathes of instrumental passages - all cut from the Genesis cloth.  Roversi's keyboard arsenal is chock full of all the old favorites - Mellotron, Hammond organ, Arp and Moog synths, etc.  Lots of similarities to Tony Bank's set up and I believe that is the whole point.  Not very Italian sounding at all.  If you long for the old school sounds of Nursery Cryme and Foxtrot check this one out.
    $18.00
  • "Nik Turner, the founding member of pioneering space-rock band HAWKWIND, returns to his intergalactic roots with his mind-blowing new CD titled "Space Gypsy". Featuring all-new material, "Space Gypsy" boasts guest appearances by fellow HAWKWIND alumnus drummer Simon House, and GONG guitar legend Steve Hillage, along with Nicky Garratt of the UK SUBS, Jurgen Engler of German industrial band DIE KRUPPS, and Jeff Piccinini of '70s punk icons CHELSEA. Making the CD release even more exciting, Nik Turner has filmed a dark, hypnotic new video called "Time Crypt featuring Simon House". This is the second video Nik has released in support of "Space Gypsy", the first being "Fallen Angel STS-51-L"; from the album's first single about the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster." 
    $15.00
  • The DVD features the new video for lead track ‘Drive Home’ along with the video for ‘The Raven That Refused To Sing’, both directed by Jess Cope. It also includes four tracks recorded live in Frankfurt during the recent tour.  In addition, the DVD features audio recordings of two previously unreleased tracks, ‘The Birthday Party’ and an orchestral version of ‘The Raven That Refused To Sing’.‘The Birthday Party’ was recorded in the LA at the same sessions as the tracks that made up the album while the version of ‘The Raven That Refused To Sing’ is a new mix that strips the track back to just the orchestra and vocals. These tracks are also featured on the CD, along with the audio from the live tracks and an edit of ‘Drive Home’. The set is packaged in a ‘mini-LP’ sleeve pac.
    $16.00