Yellow Submarine

SKU: 5099962145428
Label:
Capitol Records
Category:
Classic Rock
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"Yellow Submarine Songtrack is a compilation/soundtrack album by the Beatles for the 1999 re-release of the 1968 film Yellow Submarine. The film was re-released on 13 September 1999 in the United Kingdom and the following day in the United States. In sharp contrast with other Beatles remasters available, the songs were fully remixed from the original multitrack tapes, something not done for the original CD release of the Beatles catalogue in the late 1980s (except for Help! and Rubber Soul), nor the 2009 remastered albums.

This album contains only the Beatles songs used in the film, including tracks absent from the original Yellow Submarine album. The extra tracks replaced the George Martin film score from the original release, while the complete score was included as a DVD audio track in the CD/DVD package featuring the album and film.

The album debuted in the UK charts at number 8, selling 19,000 copies in its first week. It also peaked at number 15 on the Billboard 200, with 68,000 copies sold in its opening week. In France the album debuted at number 13.

It was reissued on CD on 4 June 2012 (5 June in North America) along with the film restored for DVD and Blu-ray release. While the original 1999 release was in a jewel-case, the 2012 version was released in a card sleeve, with the booklet and catalogue numbers the same as the earlier version, with a 1999 copyright date on the disc, and a 2012 date on the card sleeve. The sleeve was in the same format as the 2009 remasters, being slightly rectangular with "The Beatles: logo in the left hand side of the cover." - Wikipedia

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  • "Walter Becker and Donald Fagen were remarkable craftsmen from the start, as Steely Dan's debut, Can't Buy a Thrill, illustrates. Each song is tightly constructed, with interlocking chords and gracefully interwoven melodies, buoyed by clever, cryptic lyrics. All of these are hallmarks of Steely Dan's signature sound, but what is most remarkable about the record is the way it differs from their later albums. Of course, one of the most notable differences is the presence of vocalist David Palmer, a professional blue-eyed soul vocalist who oversings the handful of tracks where he takes the lead. Palmer's very presence signals the one major flaw with the album -- in an attempt to appeal to a wide audience, Becker and Fagen tempered their wildest impulses with mainstream pop techniques. Consequently, there are very few of the jazz flourishes that came to distinguish their albums -- the breakthrough single, "Do It Again," does work an impressively tight Latin jazz beat, and "Reelin' in the Years" has jazzy guitar solos and harmonies -- and the production is overly polished, conforming to all the conventions of early-'70s radio. Of course, that gives these decidedly twisted songs a subversive edge, but compositionally, these aren't as innovative as their later work. Even so, the best moments ("Dirty Work," "Kings," "Midnight Cruiser," "Turn That Heartbeat Over Again") are wonderful pop songs that subvert traditional conventions and more than foreshadow the paths Steely Dan would later take." - All Music Guide
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  • "Steely Dan hadn't been a real working band since Pretzel Logic, but with Aja, Walter Becker and Donald Fagen's obsession with sonic detail and fascination with composition reached new heights. A coolly textured and immaculately produced collection of sophisticated jazz-rock, Aja has none of the overt cynicism or self-consciously challenging music that distinguished previous Steely Dan records. Instead, it's a measured and textured album, filled with subtle melodies and accomplished, jazzy solos that blend easily into the lush instrumental backdrops. But Aja isn't just about texture, since Becker and Fagen's songs are their most complex and musically rich set of songs -- even the simplest song, the sunny pop of "Peg," has layers of jazzy vocal harmonies. In fact, Steely Dan ignores rock on Aja, preferring to fuse cool jazz, blues, and pop together in a seamless, seductive fashion. It's complex music delivered with ease, and although the duo's preoccupation with clean sound and self-consciously sophisticated arrangements would eventually lead to a dead end, Aja is a shining example of jazz-rock at its finest." - All Music Guide
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