Wild Orchids

SKU: 79172
Label:
Inside Out Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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New electric band effort from Mr. Hackett was long overdue. Wild Orchids marks the return of keyboardist Nick Magnus to the fold. The rest of the band are the cats that Steve has been recording and touring with for years now but there are augmented by the "Underworld Orchestra". The music has a subdued laid back vibe but of course we get those trademark withering solos that are unmistakably pure Hackett. Some world music influences creep into the mix in spots reminding of Peter Gabriel's solo work, while other tracks evoke the feel of Please Don't Touch. One curious inclusion is a cover of Bob Dylan's "The Man In The Long Black Coat" - Steve slays on it but...

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