When The City is Quiet

SKU: ASC23005CD
Label:
Ascendance Records
Category:
Power Metal
Add to wishlist 

Long awaited second album from this progressive power metal band from Spain. Considering everything this band went through its a wonder they are still together. Originally the band was signed to Transmission Records, the former home of After Forever and Epica. The label went bankrupt just before they were able to release a reworked version of Decoder - their debut that only saw the light of day in Japan. They have now found a home on Ascendance Records out of the UK. OK - enough back history - what's the music about? Ebony Ark is led by vocalist Beatriz Albert. She has a strong forceful voice that fits their crunchy power metal style perfectly. This is not gothic metal. These guys (and girl) take a more progressive slant. The music has an immediate in-your-face mix that really showcases her voice. Its a non-stop riff-fest with more than enough crunch and melody to satisfy. Highest recommendation.

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • “I love the CD...the sheer skill and gusto with which they tackle it makes you laugh out loud. Great drumming. Jonathan plays and writes like a demon. Congratulations to them.” - Bill BrufordDistrict 97’s 2010 debut “Hybrid Child” took the progressive rock world by storm. Since then the band toured across the US, performed at a number of high profile festivals, and even opened up for prog icons Kansas. The band now returns with their second opus “Trouble With Machines”. Former American Idol finalist Leslie Hunt fronts District 97. With a fantastic voice and looks to match, she has captured the hearts and imagination of the progressive rock world. Complexity is one of the hallmarks of District 97s compositions but the album is laced with catchy vocal melodies. The track “The Perfect Young Man” features a guest vocal appearance by King Crimson/Asia bassist John Wetton. Rich Mouser who has produced albums for Spock’s Beard and Neal Morse mixed the album. Audiophile mastering comes courtesy of Bob Katz.
    $14.00
  • Excellent new sci-fi prog metal project put together by Carptree mainman and keyboardist Carl Westholm. While Westholm is probably better known for his involvement with Carptree he has also been working in the metal field for many years in bands like Abstract Algebra, Krux, and Candlemass.Westholm has assembled an interesting cast of musicians for this larger than life Ayreon-style project. First off, Mats Leven in handling vocals. Right there that is enough for me. Leif Edling, the driving force behind Candlemass plays bass and helps with lyrics. What else do you need? Various members of Carptree and others fill out the heavily symphonic sound lending an epic scope and feel. Highly recommended.
    $3.00
  • Steven Wilson's second solo album features a variety of interesting prog luminaries including Steve Hackett, Robert Fripp, Tony Levin, Trey Gunn, Theo Travis, and Jordan Rudess. Proggier than his first solo album and frankly recent Porcupine Tree. Lots of Mellotron bliss on this one. Exemplary production wraps up the total package. This Blu-Ray edition contains the album in hi-resolution 5.1 and stereo mixes. It has 2 bonus tracks, demos, videos, and a lot more stuff.
    $17.00
  • German power metal masters. New remastered edition features 5 bonus tracks!
    $13.00
  • "Clive Nolan (Pendragon, Arena) returns with his new solo project - ‘Alchemy – a musical”, a Victorian adventure set in 1842. Next to Clive Nolan himself, the album feature the artists well known in the world of progressive rock including Tracy Hitchings (Landmarq, Strangers on a Train), Andy Sears (Twelfth Night), Paul Manzi (Arena), Damian Wilson (Threshold), Paul Menel (ex-IQ), David Clifford (Red Jasper) as well as the leading lady of Nolan's previous musical 'SHE', Agnieszka Świta and Noel Calcaterra - a Uruguayan singer/actress and the voice of Clive Nolan South American 'Otra Vida' project from 2010. The Caamora Company musicians - Clive Nolan (keyboards), Mark Westwood (guitars), Scott Higham (drums), Claudio Momberg (keyboards) and Kylan Amos (bass) will once more take charge of the instrumental part of the project. The core members of the company will be joined by special guests and a chorus. This release will be preceded by the world premiere of 'Alchemy' show at the famous Wyspianski Theatre in Katowice, Poland on February 22, 2013, where it will be recorded and released on a DVD by Metal Mind Productions in Autumn 2013."
    $17.00
  • "Sweden’s Bloodbound has returned with the fifth album “In the Name of Metal.” If you think this album is all about dripping anthems raging about the glory of metal and all related topics...you would be right. If you think you have heard it all before, well, perhaps you have. BUT....if you love "Franken-traditional" comprised of parts of Manowar, Accept, ancient Queensryche, Helloween, Skid Row, and oddly, old Bon Jovi, well you have a new master. What Bloodbound did was take the sum of those parts, add the slick 2012 production and put out one of the greatest true metal albums in memory. For every single solitary thing that Manowar did wrong with “The Lord of Steel,” Bloodbound did ten things right. If you will indulge me, let me impart a few words that apply: “Glory, majesty, unity Hail! Hail! Hail!”I often speak of songs of yore back in the great times of the beginning to mid-80's and how it evoked a spirit, a feeling...a metal brotherhood, if you will. I’ve pointed out many recent albums that evoked that spirit, and I am back to tell you that this is another of those, but the best of all - complete with the hair standing on the back of my neck. Only my favorite bands have the ability to do this, and Bloodbound was not in that realm up to this point. As far as an album that lives up to its name, “In the Name of Metal” is glaringly perfect. As an album that breaks new ground, it “falls flat.” As an insult, that last statement is completely the opposite.Having heard the song “In the Name of Metal,” it wet my appetite providing more Manowar than the aged egos of its members have since “Gods of War” (for some, much earlier). This is nothing compared to what follows: the Accept-ish “When Demons Collide” (a personal favorite), the “bonecrushing” sound of first album HammerFall on “Bonebreaker,” back to Manowar with “Metalheads Unite,” Bloodbound took every working formula and made it better. “Son of Babylon” had me head scratching wondering where I had heard that chorus and it dawned on me, if Bon Jovi made “In and Out of Love” a heavy song, it would be this. “Mr. Darkness” doesn’t just scream Helloween for nothing: it has “Mrs. God” all over it (or was that “Dr. Stein,” no...no “Mr. Torture,” wait, no “Mr. Ego”). “I’m Evil” has a chorus that echoes (linear wise) Queensryche’s “Breaking the Silence.” The comparisons here are merely meant to show the affluence of talent drawing influences from all over the metal spectrum.The most interesting combination is found within “Monstermind.” The verses present a riff right from Motley Crue’s “Dr. Feelgood.” Then right before the bridge it grinds down with that brash riff from Ozzy’s “No More Tears” (complete with the Zack Wylde style). So many great styles meld to make “In the Name of Metal,” which works in terms of catchy head banging greatness. It helps that a band has a phenom on vocals in the form of Patrik Johansson (from Dawn of Silence, not to be confused with Nils Patrik Johansson), a brotherhood of guitarists (Tomas & Henrik Olsson), the absolutely non-buzzing bass of Anders Broman, and the perfect (not mechanical) drumming of Pelle Åkerlind (Morgana Lefay). Fredrik Bergh is one of those keyboardists that is unassuming, but who’s presence is notable when absent. Even he would agree, in Bloodbound it’s all about the guitar.So, when you are all done mocking power metal for its lack of originality, Bloodbound will still be there: totally unapologetic, balls to the wall, hail and kill, steel meets steel, bells of seven hells metal that makes you want to be a metalhead. Music doesn’t always require over the top orchestration or melodramatic progressive Malthusianism. Most days, it’s what makes you instantly feel great, even though the world laughs at you for being in a “pre-pubescent phase.” For the metal faithful, every achievement in life is all “in the name of metal.”" - Metal Underground
    $15.00
  • The US "35th Anniversary Edition" is now out of print and truth be told it sounded like crap. This is the UK edition overseen by Kerry Minnear and is light years better. It features better sound, nicer package and a lot of live bonus tracks. One of the greatest prog albums of all time. A cornerstone album for any collection.
    $10.00
  • Second album from this Italian retro-hard rockers.  Voodoo Highway has been hyped as the second coming of Deep Purple/Led Zeppelin/Thin Lizzy all rolled into one.  While I wouldn't go that far I can say that they do successfully channel the spirit of those bands.  When the Hammond organ kicks in you definitely be transported to California Jam.  They pick up on the Deep Purple/Rainbow vibe and run with it...and they get pretty damn far!  Highly recommended. 
    $15.00
  • Lethal new female fronted power metal band from Portugual. Witchbreed was formed by Ares, the former bassist from Moonspell and Deepskin along with former Deepskin guitarist Dikk (I love these names). Nothing gothic going on here - pure aggressive metal with Ruby offering great vocal chops. The guitar riffing is almost like black metal in nature and there is also the occassional male gurgler. Some nice fat keyboard pads form a solid backdrop for the heavy damage the guitars inflict. The album was produced by Waldemar Sorychta who has worked with Lacuna Coil, The Gathering, Moonspell so this is familiar territory for him and it shows. First class stuff!
    $7.00
  • Great jazz rock CD from this Italian percussionist (at least he was back then). Comes housed in a mini-lp sleeve and it's actually the first time it's on CD.
    $19.00
  • The landscape of progressive rock continues to evolve. As the dinosaur bands fade away a new breed of thought provoking artistry has emerged. Bands like Porcupine Tree, Tool, Riverside, and Anathema are not about complexity or grandiose arrangements. These are bands that aim for your heart as well as your head. CloverSeeds is a new band following this course. The Opening is their second release. Their debut was released on a small French label and gave the band some national attention including a television appearance on "Ça part en live". The Laser’s Edge is committed to expand CloverSeeds fanbase to a worldwide level.Cloverseeds music is a rollercoaster ride of pure emotion filled with melancholy and dark atmospheres augmented with guitar driven heaviness. The album was recorded in Germany at Spacelab Studios under the direction of Everon’s Christian Moschus. The resulting album is an audiophile spectacular polished to perfection by Grammy winning mastering engineer Bob Katz.
    $8.00
  • ""Urban games" is not as progressive as the bands two predecessor's but it's still quite enjoyable. This is progressive rock with influences from seventies pop which makes it accessible if you're familiar to the typical music that was produced in that decade, but maybe this could also be called 'outdated' if you wish. Unlike other artist who change their style to a more commercial direction, this album still sounds as Machiavel. Still the great Italian singer with high voice and strange accent, still the songs based on piano lines, still the complexity of (some of) the compositions. "City flowers" comes close to a traditional prog epic with its different excerpts and majestic sound, some fragments in the vocals is reminiscent to Steve Walsh from Kansas. This album may be a bit uneven as the gap between pop tracks and proggy tracks is getting bigger. This doesn't mean some of the melodies aren't inspired. Even the commercial single "over the hill" is a great track which I do consider as one of the best songs in the history of the band despite its ska influences. For me the weakest moment of the album is "Dancing heroes", a pastiche to the disco sound that dominated the charts of 1979. Nice idea for a track but I rarely give it a spin.. Other, more progressive, highlights include "The humans" which includes another appealing melody. The bridge consists of the typical mellotron sound and a slice of lead guitar that gives this song an extra dimension. "Still alive" and "Let me live my life" are perfect examples of the fact that Machiavels compositions have been simplified, the progressive trademarks are still present but more apparent in the arrangements. Being both ballad like tracks, "Let me live my life" contains a memorable melody that enters your head and never leaves. A song like "the dictators" is an illustration of the influence of a band like Supertramp. If you like that band, you'll love this song.Conclusion : The last good Machiavel album but better listen to "Mechanical moonbeams" & "the jester" first." - ProgArchives
    $11.00
  • "Retribution” is the new album from Sweden’s Nightingale, the intended one-off project that refuses to die. Established by musical multi-talent Dan Swanö almost 20 years ago, the band is proof that good music can take on a life of its own, often when the artist least expects it.Known for his work both as a producer/engineer and with metal acts Edge Of Sanity, Bloodbath, Pan-Thy-Monium and most recently Witherscape, Swanö began his unplanned Nightingale journey in 1995 with “The Breathing Shadow”. It was a one-off goth-flavoured solo album heavily reminiscent of The Sisters Of Mercy, meant to satisfy his interest in the genre and then be put quietly to bed as Swanö moved on to other projects. The album was successful enough to warrant a follow-up according to his label at the time (Black Mark), but Swanö was, as he puts it "so over the goth thing.""I thought that if I was going to make a second record it had to reflect what I was listening to at the moment. I was going through a big revival of Gamma, Foreigner, Journey and all that super melodic AOR pomp rock stuff. It was a weird turn from the first record, so I decided to make Nightingale a home for music that I write in the moment, no matter what it is."Nightingale released five more albums between '96 and '07, slowly establishing a band line-up that began with Swanö's guitarist/keyboardist brother Dag in 1996 acting as a co-producer and session player on “The Closing Chronicles”. He officially came aboard in 1998 under his Tom Nouga moniker. The band was fleshed out by bassist Erik Oskarsson and drummer Tom Björn, who had their first rehearsal with the Swanö brothers on Christmas Day 2000. “White Darkness” from 2007 could well have been the last Nightingale album, as it featured very little songwriting input from Swanö due to severe writer's block. He decided to focus on his career as an engineer and chose to make music as a hobby. His creative side won eventually, however, as the urge to write and play again became irresistible."I bought a few instruments that would inspire me, and eventually the riffs started piling up," Swanö recalls. "I was collecting them for some kind of death metal release, and the other stuff that came out ended up being what could be used for a future Nightingale record."Originally titled “Bravado” in the working stages, “Retribution” offers up 10 songs steeped in uncomplicated '70s and early '80s-flavoured rock. Tracks such as 'Chasing The Storm Away', 'Forevermore' and 'The Maze' could have easily found a home on commercial rock radio 30 years ago, yet the album is completely relevant in 2014. Fans of Swanö's heavier works that are unfamiliar with Nightingale may be surprised the simplicity of the music and the band's non-aggressive approach."It's not easy to write simple stuff that's good," Swanö points out, suggesting people take a good long listen to “Retribution” rather than dismissing it.In Swanö's estimation “Retribution” succeeds because the songs "just kind of happened." He never set out to write any specific parts; the music is in fact a result of spontaneous moments, whether it was an accidental combination of notes on a keyboard that became an opening riff ('On Stolen Wings') or an odd guitar tuning ('Warriors Of The Dawn'). On top of that, the songs were hashed out in the rehearsal room before the band went into the studio, resulting in major changes to some of the music as it developed."When I listen to the record I don't want to have any regrets," explains Swanö. "There's no point in releasing a new Nightingale record if I don't think it's the best we ever did. That a pretty high standard to have, but if I don't feel that way when I listen to it the moment it's ready, it's got nothing to do with our back catalogue. That's the way I've felt with every record."Asked to sum up what “Retribution” means to him with regards to Nightingale's legacy, Swanö offers the following: "Classic rock with that pomp attitude really inspired me. I just wanted a good production that could hold up well against a band like Alter Bridge but still have a bit of the sonic charisma of the records from '79, which was a great year for music. The target was to make a timeless record with good, classy songs that the four of us can agree are really cool."Nightingale’s “Retribution” comes packaged in beautiful artwork courtesy of Travis Smith (Opeth, Nevermore, Katatonia, etc.) and should equally appeal to open-minded atmospheric metal and also to melodic prog rock supporters into bands like Rush, Marillion, Styx, Kansas, The Mission, Queensryche, Enchant, Threshold, Arena oreven Opeth and Katatonia."
    $13.00
  • "he world according to The Pineapple Thief is changing. In a recording career now stretching  back 15 years their sound has been built around the key components of progressive and heavy rock music, often seeing the south Somerset four-piece bracketed with other neo-prog bands such as Marillion and their fellow label mates Porcupine Tree. But their tenth album Magnolia gives complete lie to that ancient proverb you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.Elements of progressive, hard rock music still percolate through The Pineapple Thief’s veins – never more so than on album opener and new single ‘Simple As That’ and the blistering ‘Sense Of Fear’ – but where once there was a tendency towards excess and bombast now there is greater economy and eloquence. As founding member and principal songwriter Bruce Soord explains, there are no longer any long tunes. All he cares about now is writing good songs.The triptych of ‘Don’t Tell Me’, the album’s title song and ‘Season’s Past’ is a perfect representation of how The Pineapple Thief’s sound has evolved. Wrapped in a swathe of Andrew Skeet’s strings – something the British composer and orchestrator has previously achieved to similar resounding effect with The Divine Comedy and Imogen Heap – the songs’ stirring arrangements and inherent tenderness nod towards some of the more baroque beauty of The Verve’s Urban Hymns.On Magnolia Soord’s guitar is much more to the fore than has hitherto been the case. It is something he attributes to his Kemper Profiling Amp, through which he has channelled his imagination and realised the sounds that were inside his mind. His head must have been full of contagious, hook-laden songs then, because Magnolia delivers a dozen such gems. It is a record that could, and really should move The Pineapple Thief into the big time." - God Is In The TV
    $29.00