Watershed

Watershed

BY Opeth

(Customer Reviews)
$12.00
$ 7.20
SKU: 2179362
Label:
Roadrunner Records
Category:
Death Metal
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Ninth studio album from the kings of death prog. Opeth are the masters at creating melancholy moods and juggling complex prog rock with death metal. Not afraid to wear their influences on their sleeves, they make musical references to Deep Purple, Camel, and Mellow Candle but infuse it with something modern and stupifyingly heavy. Mikael Akerfeldt has found a good balance of clean/death vocals that serves the music well. Highly recommended.

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  • "Since Phil Anselmo joined Pantera they had gone from strength to strength with sales increasing for each subsequent album and along with their worldwide reputation as a devastatingly violent and energetic live act; this album was highly anticipated in the barren metal years of the mid-nineties. The pressures of success had however, along with excessive alcohol consumption, exhausting touring duties and Phil's drug problems, caused a rift in the band and the recording of this album was anything but a smooth process. What this in-fighting, drug addiction and despair with success spewed forth was one of the most powerful pieces of pure hatred, attitude and anger filled music ever to come out of the American deep south.The first ten seconds is an aural assault on the listener as the screams come at you with the full force of all Phil's pent-up frustrations. The guitar barbarity and drum battery will quickly have you starting a mosh pit with any unsuspecting and unfortunate individual to cross your path. Before long Dimebag Darrell's trademark Southern Hard Rock, groove layered guitar flair rears its head and the riffs are as enticingly sinister as they are absorbingly technical. The lyrics lecture us on a wide variety of topics from the evils of the media to the corruption of the justice system. There are momentary breaks from this franticly heavy barrage on tracks like the comparatively slower "10's" and most notably on "Suicide Note Pt. 1" an acoustic tale of depression. Using unusual sound effects this sombre episode looks at the man contemplating suicide and divulging his innermost emotions. "Suicide Note Pt. 2" is Pantera's attempt at creating their fastest and heaviest offering yet as they get deep down into the angers and frustrations of life and offers a warning not follow the same path. One of the major standout tracks on this album is "Floods", the guitar solo on this song is widely renowned by guitar aficionados as one of Dimebag Darrell's very best in his illustrious career and the song itself is again a rather morbid look at the state of mankind.This album is anything but easy listening and can come across as quite disjointed on the first few listens, but given time you will soon find that this album is right up there with any Pantera album and the songwriting is at times truly astonishing. It may possibly be the heaviest album they ever did yet they never got too caught up on being heavy on this one. The slower tracks really add to its diversity and make the heavier tracks sound that much more heavy. You can see why this was the beginning of the end for this band, any group this angry and self righteous would find it simply impossible to stay together indefinitely and this album sums up everything Pantera were in one nice little package." - Metal Storm
    $6.00
  • Standard edition comes (at the moment) with a slipcase "o" card wrapper."It’s been quite a past few years for the incredible Anathema. Honors have been bestowed upon them, they’ve released an instant classic album in “Weather Systems”, and last year they released one of the best live concert films I’ve ever seen, “Universal”. Anathema is on top of the world, and they are only getting bigger. With all of this on their shoulders, they approach the world once again with their new album, “Distant Satellites”, a fitting name for a massive album. Again, with all of their recent success creating huge expectations, can this band meet such critical reception? Needless to say, Vincent Cavanagh on vocals, Danny Cavanagh on guitar, Jamie Cavanagh on bass, John Douglas on percussion, Daniel Cardoso on drums, and Lee Douglas with her wonderful vocals were all up to the challenge.“Distant Satellites” is a very different album from “Weather Systems”, or anything else they’ve done, for that matter. It is different, yet somehow instantly familiar. It includes everything that makes them Anathema, but adds new and exciting elements to their already excellent formula. If you’ve never heard Anathema, their formula (in their last few albums, anyways) includes soaring guitars, amazingly catchy melodies, spiritual lyrics, and emotional flow both vocally and structurally. They are the masters of melody, and they remain complex and progressive even while being simple and accessible. They are truly masters of their craft.This new album, then, is no different in those terms. The melodies return in force, such as the serene beauty of “The Lost Song” parts 1-3. And, yet, there is something different here. The melodic lines are somewhat more complex, less in-your-face, and more organic. This especially shows in the song lengths, most of them being over five minutes. This allows for more growth and more progression. Indeed, then, the melodies on “Distant Satellites”, while not being as instantly lovable or recognizable, are certainly more difficult and possibly will have a longer “shelf life” in my mind. Yes, the orchestrations seem to be lower key, as well, allowing the vocalists to express themselves more personally then ever.There are other improvements, too. I feel that the musicianship is more fervent and on a higher plateau of difficulty than Anathema has tried. Drummer John Douglas, especially, plays amazingly well from start to finish, accenting the music with awesome pounding and fills. The rest of the band are at their peak, too, with Vincent and Lee being especially great with emotional and meaningful vocal performances.“Distant Satellites” is different in more meaningful ways, too. Utilizing post-rock/metal structures is nothing new for Anathema, but they really do perfect them here, as on “Dusk”, a dark, climactic song. Yet, there is a sense of continuity between tracks, too. This is obviously the case between the three parts of “The Lost Song”, but it’s also apparent throughout the album, as if Anathema is telling us a story, convincing us of our true selves and our connection with the universe and with each other.This album is wonderful in the first half, but my excitement reached new heights in the second half. Anathema has taken it upon themselves to change things up a bit. They wanted to progress their sound, but make it all seem so natural. So, in the second half, the album climaxes with one of the best songs, simply called “Anathema”. But then, we are thrown for a loop somewhat, as “You’re Not Alone” features a hefty portion of electronic vibe. It’s great, but the best is still to come.Next, “Firelight”, a darkly ethereal instrumental track that is completely electronic, is thrust upon us, and is followed up by what may possibly be the best song Anathema has ever produced, “Distant Satellites”. This track combines everything that has ever made Anathema great: soaring melodies, climactic structure, gentle spirituality, amazing vocals, and now an electronic beat that is both complex and catchy. Vibrant, mesmerizing, and pure, this track elates me every time I hear it. It takes this album, and my heart, to new heights. The album finishes with a gentle ballad that just seems so fitting, yet it still has the strong electronic influence.So, is “Distant Satellites” a winner? In every way! Is it their best album? I don’t know; it has the potential, but it might take time, just like “Weather Systems” did. What I can tell you is that this new album is more mature, more progressive, more interesting and eclectic, and less formulaic then anything Anathema has crafted yet. It does sacrifice some accessibility and some instant likability for these things, but I respect their decision massively, and I fully expect to see “Distant Satellites” at the tops of many lists at the end of 2014." - Progulator
    $9.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."After the failed experiment of Turbo, Judas Priest toned down the synths and returned to the basics, delivering a straight-ahead, much more typical Priest album with Ram It Down. The band's fan base was still devoted enough to consistently push each new album past the platinum sales mark, and perhaps that's part of the reason Ram It Down generally sounds like it's on autopilot. While there are some well-constructed songs, they tend toward the generic, and the songwriting is pretty lackluster overall, with the up-tempo title track easily standing out as the best tune here. And even though Ram It Down backed away from the territory explored on Turbo, much of the album still has a too-polished, mechanical-sounding production, especially the drums. Lyrically, Ram It Down is firmly entrenched in adolescent theatrics that lack the personality or toughness of Priest's best anthems, which -- coupled with the lack of much truly memorable music -- makes the record sound cynical and insincere, the lowest point in the Rob Halford era. Further debits are given for the cover of "Johnny B. Goode."" - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Not to be confused with the Greek metal band Persona Non Grata, Persona Grata are a progressive rock band from Slovakia.  There has been a bit of a buzz about this band, even catching the ear of Mike Portnoy who invited them onboard for the upcoming Progressive Nation cruise.  So what's the deal with these guys (and girl)?Persona Grata work in a contemporary style - this isn't really old school prog rock.  Lots and lots of keyboards with more than enough solos over these long and developed tracks.  Guitars veer toward the heavier side crossing over into metal at times.  I can see the reviewers' comparisons to Yes and Dream Theater but really if anything they owe a lot more to the former rather than the later but this isn't Close To The Edge.  Vocals are handled by Martin Stavrovskỳ and he's got a killer set of pipes.  Hiding out in the background, augmenting the sound are female vocals and flute of Jana Vargova.  As a bit of a respite, about halfway through the album the band throws in some Middle Eastern motifs on the long three part instrumental "Orient Express" that will bring a huge grin to your face.  All in all it has a modern feel but with the long instrumental solos and interplay it should also appeal to fans of old school prog.  Looks like Persona Grata is the real deal and we will be hearing a lot more of them.  BUY OR DIE!!
    $12.00
  • Limited edition digipak features the band's new album plus a bonus track. The DVD (PAL format) features video clips, "making of" documentary, interviews and live footage."Eluveitie are a folk metal act based in Winterthur, Switzerland, with strong Celtic influences. Helvetios is their fifth full-length studio album and first concept release. Most of their lyrics are in Gaulish, officially an extinct language. Eluveitie maintain a revolving line-up of anywhere between eight and ten musicians, performing live with a variety of folk instruments, including tin whistles, bagpipes and hurdy-gurdies. Violin is also featured prominently in their sound. The narrative of Helvetios chronicles the history of the Helvetians and their role in the Gaulish War, which took place in Europe between 58 to 50 B.C., during the height of the Roman Empire. The Helvetians where a Celtic tribe that occupied the Swiss plateau and they were ultimately defeated when the Romans finally invaded and conquered Gaul. The band's moniker, Eluveitie, is the Gaulish word for Helvetian, so it's clear that they're attempting to dig deeper into the culture that inspires their music and songwriting. The historically rooted story arc of the album is gripping, capturing the listener right from the spoken word intro, "Prologue." The narrative is one of struggle and defeat, standing up to a much more powerful enemy, and the soaring, inspiring instrumentation is the perfect accompaniment. "The Uprising" is incredibly powerful and it's easy to get swept along by its compelling imagery. These are songs of war, of resistance, rebellion, strength and loss. The defiance is balanced with regret and the emotional pitch of the album is spot on. This is unquestionably Eluveitie's strongest release, and an exceptional piece of folk metal as well." - Exclaim
    $24.00
  • Third album from this Dutch neoprog band is actually the first part of a new series they have launched.  This has that classic Dutch "sympho" sound and it makes sense since these guys were also members of Flamborough Head, Nice Beaver, Trion, and King Eider.  If you are a fan of Knight Area or Silhouette you will love this band.  Its also obvious that Genesis was a HEAVY influence on these guys - nice juxtaposition of keyboards against acoustic guitar.  Really quite beautiful dreamy prog."And the award for `biggest mouthful but oh-so proggy album title of the year' goes to Leap Day's `From the Days of Deucalion: Chapter One'! The Dutch band have taken their inspiration for this concept album from the 1950 novel `Worlds in Collision' by Immanuel Velikovsky for this 2013 album, and that cryptic and fascinating work is ripe for some progressive self-indulgence! Turning a dated screwy pseudo-science book into a melodic prog album was always going to be a bit of a gamble, but despite the odd clunky or forced moment here and there, the band has completely succeeded. Taking little cues from the classic era of Genesis and the epic sound of Pink Floyd, but with a vocal personality all their own and little traces of humour, this atmospheric work is not only Leap Day's crowning achievement to date, but one of the finest Neo Prog albums in a long while."Hear the silent pressure, feel the growing tension...". With those words and the charismatic tones of lead singer Jos Harteveld, Leap Day delivers one of the most confident openers I've heard on a prog disc for quite some time with the two part `Ancient Times/Signs On The 13th', a shining example of perfectly executed dramatic build, supreme instrumental taste and a thoughtful lead voice. A mysterious chiming guitar introduction, a slowly approaching march of stormy military drumming and disorientating synths, moody ambient passages, and a searing electric guitar weave around a sublime chorus with slow-burn pressure. The foot-tapping `Changing Directions' lifts the mood instantly with some energetic lead guitar runs to open and close the piece on, an up-tempo beat and a truly infectious melody. `Insects' has lovely mellow acoustic guitar flavours over soothing vocals that not only has the unenviable task of turning words like `Aphids come by, crawling caterpillars they jump so high, high in the sky' (yes, really!) into a wonderfully flowing chorus, but then wraps it in sweet group harmonies as well (that even briefly offer some very Collins-esque `Wind and Wuthering'-era phrasings), rising and falling Mellotron wisps, stormy strangled electric guitar apporoaching tension and loopy darting synth battles.`Hurricane' breaks up the pleasing sounds a little with a raccous and stomping Iron Maiden-styled heavy rocker with a bellowing repeated chorus. The stirring vocal, chunky bass and whirring Moogs of `Ambrosia' is a call to glasses raised - "Let's celebrate life now, drink with me, let's be immortal, eat with me divine Ambrosia", and it's hard not to be caught up in the occasion. `Haemus' carries on the merriment and positivity contrasting uplifting classic Genesis-flavoured instrumentation with tough lead vocals and heavy grooving guitars. It's then surprising that the band closes the album on an addictive instumental, `Llits doots Nus', that could have easily come off any 80's Genesis albums (if, you know, they weren't terrified of being a prog band by the time `Invisible Touch' rolled around), with it's pulsing beat, churning hard guitars and icy synths, but with a little regal fanfare bluster to end in a grand manner as well.Accompanied with a lavish CD booklet that perfectly matches the colourful variety displayed throughout the music, this album is an excellent example of a band stepping up in a massive way, despite already having delivered strong work throughout their two previous discs `Awakening the Muse' and `Skylge's Lair'. Tighter melodies, tastefully executed instrumental passages without the need for drawn-out showboating, warm production and a surreal subject matter showcase the band improving everything they already did very well, while also setting the bar very high for not only themselves, but the Neo Prog sub-genre itself. High claims, no doubt, but along with Flamborough Head's recent `Lost in Time', Leap Day's `...Deucalion: Chapter One' lifts the Neo Prog standard to great heights, so roll on `Chapter Two', Leap guys...in fact, why not make it a trilogy?!" - ProgArchives
    $14.00
  • "Good ole Vintersorg, always at one with the natural elements.  Naturbal is the third of these “elemental” records, and if it wasn’t obvious from the cover, this one deals with the element of fire.  Combining these folky elements with the later day penchant for the progressive has done the band well, with Naturbal continuing to wave the Vintersorg banner high for all to see.Vintersorg has always had their own singular vision on the black/folk genre and Naturbal comes across as more of the same.  The highlight to each Vintersorg release is that of Mr. V’s charismatic vocals (particularly of the clean variety) and he brings his A-game to this one as well (like always).  Tracks like “Rymdens Brinnande Oar,” “Ur Aska Och Sot,” and “Sjal I Flamma” are sure to please long time fans of the epic sing-a-long clean vocal choruses.  The merger of the catchy, melodic clean sung choruses with the more aggressive, black metal verses is the bread and butter of Vintersorg’s musical output and does not disappoint.  Rougher cuts like “En Blixt Fran Klar Himmel” and “Elddraken” (The Fire Dragon) bring a nice balance of speedy melodic black metal with enough bombast to keep listeners on their toes.  Those looking more towards the progressive spectrum will surely dig tracks like “Lagornas Rov” and “Urdarmane.”  Clearly, Vintersorg has a bit of something for everyone this time around.Even though it doesn’t bring much new to the table, it doesn’t make Naturbal any less compelling.  With the solid and mostly consistent discography that Vintersorg has already established, it’s hard to blame the band for giving us all what we really want.  The essence of Vintersorg has been boiled down to a science at this point.  Through the established sound and unique vocals, it’s easy to spot a Vintersorg release.  This is simply continued quality from the Swedish masters." - Dead Rhetoric
    $12.00
  • Blow out price on this now out of print disc. Sinisthra is a new band from Finland that plays melancholic metal in the vein of Sentenced and Amorphis. There is a modern slant to the production. This one is a heavy, emotional ride. Last chance to grab this one before it's gone forever.
    $12.00
  • "“Appalachian Court is a new, all acoustic album from Odin’s Court, firmly rooted in acoustic rock. It has its own, unique, well blended sound featuring aspects of various genres such as rock, progressive, folk, country, bluegrass, reggae, jazz, and more.” The album contains completely rearranged versions of tracks from three previous Odin's Court albums: Driven by Fate, Deathanity and Human Life In Motion. For the first time, the band is including covers on the release."
    $3.00
  • This is the first North American release for Move, the fifth album in the Freak Kitchen discography.  Freak Kitchen is led by renowned guitarist/vocalist Mattias Eklundh. The band describes Move as "More metal, more experimental, more fascinating… will please the fans and will without any possible doubt convert the newcomers." It is also the first album to feature drummer Bjorn Fryklund.  Intense guitar driven music that blurs the fine line between progressive rock and metal.  Essential for fans of Frank Zappa, Bumblefoot, and Steve Vai."Freak Kitchen return with their fifth album, a new drummer and bass player. The first noticeable difference is the inclusion of double kick drums at the beginning of the opening track "Propaganda Pie." They definitely add an extra metal "oooomph" to Freak Kitchen's sound.Of course Eklundh fills the album with crazy, off-the-wall, impossible to play solos and licks. His playing alone is worth the price of the album. But that is not even the best part, as basically every song on the album is extremely catchy and memorable. These are the type of songs that get stuck in your head for hours.The lyrics generally deal with real world issues, such as sweatshops ("Logo"), divorce ("Seven Days In June"), and drug addiction ("Herion Breakfast"). The topics are serious, but generally the music is upbeat; they are addressed in a somewhat sarcastic way, although a few songs could be considered 'depressing.' Probably "Seven Days In June" and "Razor Flowers." The latter track is sung by the bassist, and he does a great job.Move is definitely not 100% TR00 METUHL, but it rocks, and it has the high quality of musicianship that metal fans enjoy, so it should appeal to many a listener." - Metal Archives
    $14.00
  • New remastered edition with bonus tracks.Second Consortium sideproject put together by Ian Parry, lead singer for Elegy. Also appearing in this supergroup is Elegy bandmates Patrick Rondat and Dirk Bruinenberg, Vanden Plas guitarist Stephan Lill, and Thom Youngblood of Kamelot. This concept album is melodic metal all the way. What were you expecting???
    $14.00
  • Get yer puffy shirts on matey! Alestorm are a Scottish power metal band who play "pirate metal", the likes that you haven't heard since the glory days of Running Wild. This is the limited edition that comes with a bonus DVD (PAL Region 0) of the band's performance at the Wacken Festival in 2008.
    $18.00
  • Remastered version of the band's first classic release. Comes with one bonus track - a live version of "Bringing It Back".
    $5.00
  • Once again we turn to Norway for a fresh take on an old sound. With amps turned way up, Anti-Depressive Delivery blend classic progressive rock with modern raw aggression. Mellotron, organ and synth clash with frantic guitar leads underscoring this young band's appreciation for prog and metal Gods past and present. Think Anekdoten mixed with Pain Of Salvation and Somnambulist.The prog world may never be the same...
    $5.00