War Of Ages

SKU: NPR478
Label:
Napalm Records
Category:
Power Metal
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Austrian progressive power metal band Serenity has been a bit overlooked in the past but it appears as though their star is in ascendancy.  Ex-Whyzdom vocalist Clementine Delauney complements lead vocalist Georg Neuhauser quite well.  Perhaps she nudges him out of the spotlight a bit but all for the greater good.  The music has a large scale symphonic element that will draw comparisons to Kamelot.  Since they have toured with Youngblood & Co its not that surprising.  So the formula seems to be in place - two great vocalists married to melodic, bombastic metal.  Their best album.  Who's in?

 

Product Review

[email protected]
Tue, 2013-04-09 20:28
Rate: 
0
Amazing album, clean male and female vocals from outstanding singers, with a bit of a Kamelot sound. One of the best releases so far this year, great playing, and great songs. This release should put them over the top,.
[email protected]
Mon, 2013-12-09 00:08
Rate: 
0
By far my favorite album of 2013. The vocals are perfect, all the songs are good. Keyboards and guitars are present to give the music a good balance. Perfect album.
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Product Review

[email protected]
Tue, 2013-04-09 20:28
Rate: 
0
Amazing album, clean male and female vocals from outstanding singers, with a bit of a Kamelot sound. One of the best releases so far this year, great playing, and great songs. This release should put them over the top,.
[email protected]
Mon, 2013-12-09 00:08
Rate: 
0
By far my favorite album of 2013. The vocals are perfect, all the songs are good. Keyboards and guitars are present to give the music a good balance. Perfect album.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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