Waiting For The Flood

Lethal third album from this German heavy stoner/psych quartet.  Waiting For The Flood clocks in near 50 minutes and consists of only four tracks (!).  While mixing in Eastern motifs and instrumentation(dig the sitar), the band explores some of their heaviest terrain.  Bass lines distort, drums pound away, and then the wah wah laced soloing blasts into the deepest realm of the cosmos.  Ocassionally some keys will crop up adding a nice effect.  The music effortless morphs from doomy Sabbath metal into Guru Guru sonic explorations that will definitely rattle your cage.  Think Masters Of Reality meets Hinten. A total mind blower that scores a 6 on the vaporizer scale.  BUY OR DIE! 

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  • Here is what Century Media has to say about it:"Once again Nevermore invite you into their world of desolate metal. On their sixth release, Nevermore blend elements of speed, power, progressive and even death metal to make for a unique listen. With the addition of Steve Smyth to the ranks, this band is prepared to deliver an impending wave of doom over the land. Comes with enhanced features for your computer.
    $8.00
  • "Black Sabbath was unraveling at an alarming rate around the time of their second to last album with original singer Ozzy Osbourne, 1976's Technical Ecstasy. The band was getting further and further from their original musical path, as they began experimenting with their trademark sludge-metal sound. While it was not as off-the-mark as their final album with Osbourne, 1978's Never Say Die, it was not on par with Sabbath's exceptional first five releases. The most popular song remains the album closer, "Dirty Women," which was revived during the band's highly successful reunion tour of the late '90s. Other standouts include the funky "All Moving Parts (Stand Still)" and the raging opener, "Back Street Kids." The melodic "It's Alright" turns out to be the album's biggest surprise -- it's one of drummer Bill Ward's few lead vocal spots with the band (Guns N' Roses covered the unlikely track on their 1999 live set, Live Era 1987-1993)." - Allmusic Guide
    $9.00
  • Modern British progressive rock cut from similar cloth to Radiohead and Muse.
    $12.00
  • "It was during the Cardiacs European tour of 1988 that The Alphabet Business Concern generously commissioned this recording of the gala performance at Amsterdam’s prestigious Paradiso. A very strange and worrying story is attached to the making of this album."
    $18.00
  • "Jolly is a real rising star in the world of rock music, combining elements of art pop, dark rock, progressive music and much more. After a terrible ordeal with losing their equipment in Hurricane Sandy, the band came out of that stronger than ever and released its brand new album, The Audio Guide to Happiness, part 2.Straight away you get a sense that this isn’t a typical band you’d expect to find on Inside Out. The start is almost that of an industrial band. We are then hit in the face by some power chords on the guitar. A beautiful gentle part follows, which seems to be the recurring pattern on the album – gentleness followed by aggression or vice versa. When you thought you couldn’t be surprised more, the band returns with some shattering metal riffs to take the intensity even further. Anadale’s voice adds an even more modern texture to the sound with its indie rock / new metal quality. The two Guidance interludes show Jolly capable of creating ambient pieces of real beauty as well. Lucky is on the verge of synth pop, were it not for the crunching guitars. It’s really fun observing Jolly playing around with so many genres. As Heard on Tape is another fascinating departure, with a folk motif and the use of bagpipes. The Grand Utopia brings the album to an epic close, with another wild ride on the rollercoaster of our senses.Jolly is a real sensual experience for musical epicures. You get an incredibly wide taste of their musical world. This is a band which is going places and I wouldn’t be surprised if they really make it huge in a few years. It is a real pleasure to listen to an album which is very easy to listen to and at the same time totally unburdened by any genre definitions." - The Rocktologist
    $12.00
  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hardly be called fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.Bassist/cellist Isao Suzuki turned in this hot set in 1975.  The quartet is augmented with two guest players.  Its a hell of ensemble - Kazumi Watanabe on guitar, Kenji Mori on flute, alto sax, and bass clarinet, Takashi Mizuhashi on bass, Kunihiko Sugano on piano and organ, and George Otsuka on drums.  The iconic Japanese female jazz singer Mari Nakamoto also appears on one track.  While I'm not a huge fan of jazz vocals it works well here - Mori adds some beautiful flute.  The album consists of 4 long tracks culminating in the 15 minute album title work out.  It starts out a bit experimental but slowly develops.  Next thing you know you are deep into a groove that rivals "Green Catapillar" with Watanabe throwing down some blistering solos.  Highly recommended.
    $29.00
  • Fantastic third album from Flower Kings bassist Jonas Reingold's side project. New lineup includes Lalle Larsson on keyboards - he's one of the sickest, badest mo-fo players on the planet. Classically trained and chops from hell but plays with real sensitivity - not just blazing fast runs. Goran Edman is back on vocals as is drummer Zoltan Csörsz and Krister Jonsson on guitar. FK keyboardist Tomas Bodin guests as does Andy Tillson and Theo Travis - both from The Tangent. The album opens up with the 20 minute "Send A Message From The Heart" - a monster track that out-Flower Kings the Flower Kings. All killer - no filler. 100% prog guaranteed. Highly recommended.
    $13.00
  • "It is summer and it's hot in California. For the recording musician it means that air conditioners are causing problems and are generally too loud. So, the musician can either sit on their ass and do nothing or simply switch gears and record an album with sounds that are louder than the air conditioners. This is what Henning Pauly decided to do when he realized that moving on to his rock-opera "Babysteps" was not possible right now. He called up the singer of the new band of his bandmates from Chain, Transmission, in Germany and asked if he was available. Juan Roos immediately said yes to the project, but he only had a two week window and it was two weeks from that phone call. Henning loves deadlines and so he started writing to have the album written and recorded, minus vocals, within two weeks.Henning describes Juan's voice as a perfect blend between Geoff Tate and David Coverdale: "Juan can give you the high stuff, but he can also be really raspy and rocky...his voice just kicks you square in the nuts!"Because of the very limited time frame for the conception and production of "Credit where credit is due" Henning asked his proven writing team to join in when it comes to lyrics and melodies, so Matt Cash is on board again, as are Edward Heppenstall and Jason McSheehy. Several songs on the album loosely deal with the world of rockstars, scandals and getting credit for what one has done. No need, really, to point out here that everyone involved will get credit where credit is due.The music is loud, heavy and realism has been shoved behind production value on the list of priorities. Heavy Industrial Drum sounds are interspersed with acoustic sets. The banjo finds its way into metal again and sometimes you can draw clear parallels to the work of Trent Reznor and Marylin Manson. There's more to it than just that, but the production is clearly more modern than anything Henning is done so far.This CD was about having fun with music and production and it gives Henning a chance to be back in the studio and have fun doing what he loves the most...making music, not talking about it."
    $3.00
  • "From the moment the then still teenage Protest the Hero announced themselves to the world with their phenomenal debut record Kezia in 2006, the Whitby, Ontario quintet have been considered somewhat of a divisive force in the heavy music scene. Almost universally revered for their technical proficiency, but often misunderstood by casual listeners due to it, Protest the Hero have amassed an equal amount of fans as they have detractors for the spasmodic, genre-hopping nature of their compositions. Thankfully for the band, the fan base that they have acquired is a loyal, dedicated, and above all, passionate one. As a result of this, the band was able to finance their latest release, Volition, via the popular crowd funding service Indiegogo, and after repeated listens I can tell you that those fans are about to see their investment in Protest the Hero pay off big time.Volition, the band’s fourth full-length and first since 2011’s impressive, Scurrilous, is without a shadow of a doubt Protest the Hero’s best and most consistently mind-blowing release to date and it should see the band ascend to their rightful place amongst the upper-echelon of the progressive-metal scene. Opening with the barnstorming lead single, “Clarity,” a track that encapsulates all that is good about this band (soaring melodies, frantic shredding, earth shaking breakdowns and a rhythm section tighter than your metronome), Volition sets a cracking pace, grabbing the listener’s attention from the get-go and refusing to let go until it has had its way with you. It’s as if from the moment vocalist Rody Walker (channeling his best Sebastian Bach) screams, “Without a word uttered, a comparison is drawn,” your ears have been taken hostage by an evil musical overlord and your body has no choice but to nod along in reverence. And nod along you will as “Clarity” is followed in quick succession by the equally impressive “Drumhead Trial” and oh-so-appropriately titled “Tilting Against Windmills” (seriously TRY not windmilling to the sheer face-melting shred-fest taking place in this track) in an opening trilogy of stunning quality.With the albums modus-operandi in place, Protest the Hero continue the all-out sonic assault with the incendiary “Without Prejudice,” a piece of thrash driven metal majesty that highlights the thunderous groove provided by fill-in drummer Chris Adler (of Lamb of God fame) before letting up briefly to allow space for bassist Arif Mirabdolbagh to lay down one of the most impressive bass solos in recent memory. In fact, the rhythm section is simply stellar across the whole of Volition, with Mirabdolbagh’s talents being brought to the forefront unlike ever before, and Adler’s stick work undoubtedly causing many a Protest the Hero fan to bemoan the fact he is not sticking around as a permanent member — (the band has announced Mike Ieradi as a permanent replacement for the departed Moe Carlson).From this point onward Volition takes the listener on a bit of a journey through the most impressive elements of Protest the Hero’s past-works, incorporating their familiar genre-hopping habits as they effortlessly make the leap between the progressive-metal of “Yellow Teeth” into the punk-influenced “Plato’s Tripartite” and “Underbite,” through the more sprawling “Mist” and ferocious hardcore influence of “A Life Embossed” and “Animal Bones.” Considering the amount of sonic territory the band covers here they would be forgiven for losing or burying melody in the mix of all the technical proficiency, but it has to be said that the opposite is true, as it is arguably on these tracks that the melodic elements of Protest the Hero really shine.This is as much a testament to the work of the much-heralded guitar tandem of Luke Hoskin and Tim Millar as it is the input of Rody Walker, who it has to be said puts in his finest performance to date on Volition. Whether busting a nut in his trademark power metal howl on tracks such as “Clarity” and “Without Prejudice” or cutting loose with a guttural roar on the likes of “A Life Embossed” and “Animal Bones,” or crooning hauntingly in the outro of “Mist,” Walker absolutely nails it and this should be the album that puts the end to any criticism people might have about his unique vocal style. The lyrics are also much improved on previous outings, moving away for the more fantastical style of the band’s earlier works and instead occupying a middle ground between self-reflective introspection and intelligent social commentary, a maturation that blends superbly with the more rounded songwriting style displayed on the album.For their part, Hoskin and Millar put on a near-peerless display on Volition. From the opening tracks they display a rare ability to juxtapose beautiful melodic passages with breakneck riffing, all the while leaving themselves enough room to dazzle listeners with their rather unique take on all-out-shredfest. The end result of this slightly more thought out approach is that the solos actually stand out more, ensuring that although they are fewer in number than on previous albums, the ones that are there are spellbinding. Perhaps nowhere is this more evident than on album closer, “Skies,” a track that incorporates all of these elements into one of the most bat-shit-crazy tracks you will ever hear.As per usual with Protest the Hero, there are several guest appearances scattered across Volition, including the now traditional vocal contributions from folk singer Jadea Kelly on “Plato’s Tripartite” and “Yellow Teeth,” a track that also features violin from Raha Javanfar and guitar from Wyatt Shun. The absolute stand out of all of these guest appearances (there are too many to mention them all) however has to be the blistering solo contributed by Ron Jarzombek of Blotted Science on “Drumhead Trial” — it is seriously bordering on otherworldly what that guy is capable of doing with a guitar, and his contribution helps to take the track to another level of awesome.While I am conscious that I have thrown out a lot of superlatives in this review, this album is not the perfect progressive-metal release, there is times where the band still manage to get caught up in their own cleverness at the expense of the quality of the songs, but these moments are few and far between and Volition benefits greatly from the slightly more controlled approach the band has taken to crafting these songs.There is a lot of skepticism around about bands using crowdfunding to pay for the recording process, but if bands back up their fans’ investment by producing the best record of their career like Protest the Hero have done with Volition, then the music industry may have found its best business model yet. Seriously go out and buy it. You won’t regret it." - Under The Gun
    $14.00
  • "In 1972 Jethro Tull were riding high on the crest of a popularity wave. They sold out huge arenas on the back of their critically acclaimed fifth album Thick As A Brick. The question was, how do you follow a concept album comprising a single 44-minute piece of music? The answer was, with a double album of separate songs of course.For the first time in their five year career Tull went into the studio with an unchanged line-up. Founder member and undisputed leader Ian Anderson was still writing songs on flute, acoustic guitar and now saxophone, and he was again joined by guitarist Martin Barre, bassist Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond, drummer Barriemore Barlow and keyboard player John Evans. But which studio to use?The first criterion was that it had to be abroad. The second criterion was that the studio of choice had to have a good reputation. The 18th century Château d'Hérouville near Paris had previously been used by Elton John to record Honky Château and by Pink Floyd for Obscured By Clouds. It contained living accommodation as well as studio facilities, and so seemed the ideal choice. What could possibly go wrong?The choice was a disaster. First up, there were technical problems with the studio itself. Then there was the accommodation... the band all slept in a dormitory, it was very basic which might have been tolerable, had they been the sole occupants of the rooms. Unfortunately, they had unwelcome company, of a bed-bug variety. And then to make matters infinitely worse everybody got food poisoning from the in-house catering.Unsurprisingly the band decided to go home and the decision was made to ditch the hour or so s worth of music recorded in France. They decided to start from scratch and write a whole new album, instead of trying to somehow regenerate everybody s interest and commitment to something that had already struggled.And so to A Passion Play, an album that evolved into a 45-minute piece of quasi-prog rock, with complex time-signatures, complex lyrics and, well, complex everything, really. With a mere nine days left in the studio before the next tour, the pressure was on to produce something quickly. The concept explored the notion that choices might still be faced in the afterlife. It recognizes that age-old conflict between good and bad, God and the Devil.This beautifully packaged 2CD/2DVD case-bound book expanded edition of A Passion Play includes the original album and earlier Château d'Hérouville Sessions both of which have been mixed to 5.1 surround sound and new stereo mixes by Steven Wilson."Disc: 11. Lifebeats /Prelude2. The Silver Cord3. Re-Assuring Tune4. Memory Bank5. Best Friends6. Critique Oblique7. Forest Dance #18. The Story Of The Hare Who Lost His Spectacles9. Forest Dance #210. The Foot Of Our Stairs11. Overseer Overture12. Flight From Lucifer13. 10.08 to Paddington14. Magus Perde15. EpilogueDisc: 21. The Big Top2. Scenario3. Audition4. Skating Away5. Sailor6. No Rehearsal7. Left Right8. Solitaire9. Critique Oblique (Part I)10. Critique Oblique (Part II)11. Animelee (1st Dance) [Instrumental]12. Animelee (2nd Dance) [Instrumental]13. Law Of The Bungle (Part I)14. Tiger15. Law Of The Bungle (Part II)Disc: 31. A Passion Play mixed to 5.1 DTS and AC3 Dolby Digital surround sound and PCM 96/24 PCM stereo.2. A flat transfer from the original master at PCM 96/24 stereo3. Video clips of The Story Of The Hare Who Lost His Spectacles an intro and outro film used in the Passion Play tour of 1973.Disc: 41. The Château d'Hérouville Sessions mixed to 5.1 DTS and AC3 Dolby Digital surround sound
    $40.00
  • One of my favorite albums from Threshold. Damian Wilson is a real standout and the music's subtle celtic underpinning give the album a distinct flavor. New edition comes with 3 bonus tracks.
    $18.00
  • "After the lack of success garnered by 1970's The Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus, Randy California (guitar/vocals) -- who had recently suffered a nearly fatal horse-riding accident -- split from the combo, leaving only Ed Cassidy (drums) and John Locke (keyboards) to carry on from the original lineup. They were joined by brothers Al Staehely (bass/lead vocals) and Christian Staehely (guitar/vocals), with the former supplying a majority of the album's solid material. His consistently strong songs were perfect for this seemingly hastily collected aggregate. Unlike Jay Ferguson (vocals) and Mark Andes' (guitar/vocals) boogie outfit Jo Jo Gunne, Spirit remained steeped in equal measures of pop, rock, and jazz. That said, "Cadillac Cowboys" could have just as easily passed off for Gunne, with the propulsive backbeat centered down the spine of the slightly syncopated rhythm, perfect for Cassidy's percussive inflections and innate sense of timing. Locke's instrumentals "Trancas Fog-Out" and "Puesta del Scam" also put the drummer in the driver's seat, as his compact interjections propel Christian Staehely's guitar and Locke's aggressive piano leads. Producer David Briggs captures these in an almost v rit manner, as each musician spontaneously reflects his counterparts la the band's 1968 debut -- and perhaps more pointedly Locke's ten-minute epic "Elijah." "Darkness" is another Locke side that is worth mentioning with regard to the interaction among the quartet members, as the noir waltz perfectly captures the strengths of this lineup. "
    $5.00
  • Svart Records can be thought of as the Rise Above Records of Finland.  Both labels covers similar territory.  Somehow Svart signed the British band Messenger right from under the nose of Rise Above.  Messenger are a superb retro-band that push all the right buttons for a fans of 70s prog and folk.  This isn't a bombastic throw back album like Astra or Diagonal.  Instead Messenger's music is cut more from the cloth that Midlake are exploring.  In other words what you get is a kind of mystical, pastoral folk with strong prog overtones.  Flutes and 'tron fuse with echoey acoustic guitars in a way that transport you to some ancient forest.  At various points through out the album I'm reminded of Pink Floyd, Trespass-era Genesis, early King Crimson and Traffic.  The band started out as a trio with guests and has now expanded into a full fledge touring ensemble.  I expect we will hear quite a bit from this band in the immediate future.  Highly recommended. 
    $27.00
  • Many years ago Sieges Even recorded a live album that was never released (the band had dissolved). Now the band has two studio albums under their belt with the latest lineup it was time to finally give us a live disc. Playgrounds features material from Paramount, The Art Of Navigating The Stars, and A Sense Of Change (!!).
    $12.00