In Vaults

SKU: LE1072
Label:
Laser's Edge
Category:
Progressive Rock
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The release of 2012's critically acclaimed Trouble With Machines ushered in an exciting era for Chicago-based Progressive Rock band District 97. In 2013, the band toured both Europe and the US with legendary bassist and vocalist John Wetton (King Crimson/UK/Asia), which was documented on 2014's live release, One More Red Night: Live in Chicago. 2013 also saw the band nominated for a Limelight Award by Prog Magazine. Rather than rest on their laurels, District 97 took to the studio in 2014 to record the new material they'd been honing at home and on the road. The resulting album, In Vaults, continues and accelerates the upward trajectory of great songwriting and incredible musicianship that's been evident since the band's 2010 debut, Hybrid Child. One listen perfectly illustrates why John Wetton says, “I've said it before, and I maintain that D97 is the best young progressive band around right now. Gifted players, great material, and a brilliant, charismatic singer in Leslie Hunt."

In addition to its evocative and powerful songwriting and performances, In Vaults features the immaculate mixing of Rich Mouser (Spock's Beard, Transatlantic), mastering by Grammy winning engineer Bob Katz and the stunning imagery of Björn Gooßes of Killustraitions.
 

Product Review

lfmulla
Mon, 2015-06-29 15:34
Rate: 
0
District 97 are now three albums into what will hopefully be a long a fruitful career. "In Vaults" is my favorite from them so far. To my ears, the writing is tighter and the melodies are more cohesive. The songs flow very well and support the overall musical statement almost flawlessly. I also enjoy the semi-jazzy approach to the vocals in many of the tracks where the melody does not linearly follow the chord structures (somewhat akin to Bruford's late 70's albums). Speaking of the vocals, Leslie Hunt just gets better with age. Her tone is clear, resonant and attention-grabbing. The rest of the band delivers in spades, as well, with great guitar and keyboard interplay. While we are still not even halfway through with 2015, I am confident that this album will find a place in my top 10 of the year. Leyth
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Product Review

lfmulla
Mon, 2015-06-29 15:34
Rate: 
0
District 97 are now three albums into what will hopefully be a long a fruitful career. "In Vaults" is my favorite from them so far. To my ears, the writing is tighter and the melodies are more cohesive. The songs flow very well and support the overall musical statement almost flawlessly. I also enjoy the semi-jazzy approach to the vocals in many of the tracks where the melody does not linearly follow the chord structures (somewhat akin to Bruford's late 70's albums). Speaking of the vocals, Leslie Hunt just gets better with age. Her tone is clear, resonant and attention-grabbing. The rest of the band delivers in spades, as well, with great guitar and keyboard interplay. While we are still not even halfway through with 2015, I am confident that this album will find a place in my top 10 of the year. Leyth
You must login or register to post reviews.
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