Train Of Thought

SKU: 7559-62891
Label:
WEA
Category:
Metal/Hard Rock
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Latest album (available at a great price) finds the band going for a harder edge more guitar dominated sound similar to Awake. Still plenty for Rudess to do - he's all over this thing - but it definitely has a different sound than the last couple of albums.

Product Review

[email protected]
Mon, 2011-08-08 10:14
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0
For me this is the best DT release. This hard edged metal sounds so ... honest, i dont find any better word to describe my feelings when listening to it. Sometimes pretentious, but DT is pretentious, isnt it? At least not that much on this album.
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Product Review

[email protected]
Mon, 2011-08-08 10:14
Rate: 
0
For me this is the best DT release. This hard edged metal sounds so ... honest, i dont find any better word to describe my feelings when listening to it. Sometimes pretentious, but DT is pretentious, isnt it? At least not that much on this album.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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