Szobel

SKU: LE1064
Label:
The Laser's Edge
Category:
Fusion
Add to wishlist 

Previously unavailable on CD, Hermann Szobel’s “Szobel” was originally released by Arista Records in 1976. Over the years the album has established a worldwide cult following and the mysterious Mr. Szobel has become a bit of an enigma. Szobel was a 17-year virtuoso pianist who arrived from Austria with aspirations to become a star in the world of jazz. He also happened to be the nephew of rock impresario Bill Graham. Originally intended for release on Arista’s Freedom jazz imprint, the decision was made by Clive Davis to release the debut album on Arista proper in order to give it a chance at a broader appeal. An extraordinary band was assembled to record Szobel’s highly complex music: Michael Visceglia on bass, Bob Goldman on drums, Dave Samuels on percussion including marimba and vibraphone, and Vadim Vyadro on tenor sax, clarinet, and flute. Szobel was highly influenced by Martial Solal and Frank Zappa. His compositions are rooted in jazz, rock and Western classical composition. They are extremely complex and the recording sessions were quite laborious. While he gives space to all of the musicians, his phenomenal technique as a pianist is clearly displayed. In the September 6, 1976 issue of Downbeat the review said that Szobel had "a conception and technique far in advance of most musicians twice his age." Upon its release the album did not sell well and Szobel’s behavior became more and more eccentric. In the middle of recording a second (still unreleased) album, rumor has it that he suffered a mental breakdown. He disappeared from the music world forever. Since then rumors have swirled and a mythology has been created. Unconfirmed reports have Mr. Szobel currently living in Austria. “Szobel” has now been mastered for CD release by audiophile engineer Bob Katz. Extensive liner notes by bassist Michael Visceglia unlock some of the mysteries of Hermann Szobel.

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • "TAROT is not only a card game, but also a long time running Heavy Metal band from Finland. The band was founded in the early eighties (!) by the Hietala brothers, Marco and Zachary. The first album "Spell Of Iron" was finally released in 1986. Much later Marco became famous as a member of SINERGY and of course NIGHTWISH, but he never abandoned his "baby band“. From time to time with some breaks, for obvious reasons, TAROT have released great albums which have made them a great addition to the metal scene. In 2007 Tarot signed a contract with Nuclear Blast and released the highly anticipated album “Crows Fly Black”.. The first single “You” entered the Finish charts on position # 1. One Year later in 2008 after several tours they released their first Live DVD ever. “Live Undead Indeed” also entered the Finish DVD Charts on position # 1. Now in 2010, TAROT is back in business. The hairy dudes from the town of Kuopio, county of Savo, Finland have again come up with a bunch of songs, which you will be able to hear on their eighth studioalbum titled “Gravity Of Light”. Most of the demo work for this album was done in August and September 2009 by Marco Hietala, Zachary Hietala and Janne Tolsa, the main writers of the band. The actual recordings for the album started immediately after that in November 2009. Mixing has been done by Janne and Mikko Tegelman and the mastering by Mika Jussila at Finnvox studios in January and February 2010. The album feels like meeting an old friend. Some things are the same, but your friend has gained weight. He shows new scars, and tattoos. The beard is longer and he projects a meaner and faster temper. At the same time there´s still a big heart at the center. The blood might rush to your head when your friend takes you to a weightless sauna orbiting the sun. When you hear “Gravity Of Light” you will believe."
    $7.00
  • "Garden Wall would get heavier in subsequent albums, but on their debut the band seems to be paying tribute to a whole host of neo-prog bands like Marillion, Pendragon and Cathedral. In fact they remind me quite a bit of Cathedral with their heavy rhythm section grounding the guitar arpeggios and keyboard flourishes. The vocals here are measurably better though.I don’t know much about these guys, but this album shows they have a strong knowledge of eighties progressive rock. Musically they remind me a little bit of fellow countrymen Sad Minstrel with their highly expressive and heavier rock sound, but these guys rely a lot more on synth orchestral layers than that group. The songs all exude plenty of energy, although I’m left with a general feeling that this is closer to slightly moody eighties music than some of their neo contemporaries.While I said the vocals are better than bands like Cathedral, vocalist Alessandro Seravalle does have a strong attribute of the throaty singing of many eighties crooners like Frankie Goes to Hollywood’s Holly Johnson or the Romantics Wally Palmar. The music isn’t anything like those bands, but Seravalle seems to be another in a long line of Bryan Ferry soundalikes who have graced album tracks over the past thirty years or so. Not necessarily a bad thing, and considering the band’s penchant for moody synthetic sounds on tracks like “Silent Waves in a Raging Ocean” and “Ekpyrosis”, his voice is for the most part a reasonable fit.Speaking of “Ekpyrosis”, this is the most lengthy song on the album at more than thirteen minutes, and while it features some grand climaxes and really cool chamber vocals, for the most part I think the thing drags on for a bit longer than is necessary, especially in the middle section.The band shows a glimpse of what’s to come with the closing “Onde Radio” though, a prototypical neo- prog number with driving drums, soaring electric guitar and a torrid pace. This is much close to the sound the band would show on their next couple of albums, but on this debut the brooding synth arrangements seem to be much more prevalent.This isn’t a great album by any means, but it is decent. So three stars are not unreasonable. I wouldn’t spend a lot of money on a copy, but at a fair price this would make an okay addition to most neo-progger’s collections. Recommended to fans of late eighties neo bands and those who like Italian music that isn’t awash with symphonic pompousness." - Progarchives
    $9.00
  • 28 years is a long time for a band to stay together but that's how long Woodenhead has been playing together. They have quietly cultivated a dedicated cult following in New Orleans. Now Free Electric Sound is bringing this extraordinary quartet to a national audience. Woodenhead's music is a spicy gumbo of jazz fusion, symphonic rock and local R 'n' B flavors (sorry for the wordplay!) The group has toured the U.S. and Central America and has played the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival for over 20 years. The band has played with the Dixie Dregs, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Billy Cobham, Chick Corea's Elektrik Band, John McLaughlin Trio, Bela Fleck and The Flecktones, Tuck And Patti, Hugh Masekela, Spyro Gyra, Robben Ford, Johnny Winter, Stevie Ray Vaughn, and John Mayall, and has toured with the Steve Morse Band and Allan Holdsworth."Perseverance", the band's 6th album, was recorded live in New Orleans and captures all the energy and emotional playing of a Woodenhead gig. Augmented by a horn section, the band's music comes across as a blend of the Dixie Dregs, Happy The Man, and Hot Rats-era Zappa. This is an album with broad appeal to fans of jazz rock, prog rock and even Cajun music. "At the New Orleans jazz festival, Woodenhead gets a standing ovation for teaching traditional jazz fans just how far imagination and electricity can push the form" - Esquire magazine
    $5.00
  • "Nefertiti, the fourth album by Miles Davis' second classic quintet, continues the forward motion of Sorcerer, as the group settles into a low-key, exploratory groove, offering music with recognizable themes -- but themes that were deliberately dissonant, slightly unsettling even as they burrowed their way into the consciousness. In a sense, this is mood music, since, like on much of Sorcerer, the individual parts mesh in unpredictable ways, creating evocative, floating soundscapes. This music anticipates the free-fall, impressionistic work of In a Silent Way, yet it remains rooted in hard bop, particularly when the tempo is a bit sprightly, as on "Hand Jive." Yet even when the instrumentalists and soloists are placed in the foreground -- such as Miles' extended opening solo on "Madness" or Hancock's long solo toward the end of the piece -- this never feels like showcases for virtuosity, the way some showboating hard bop can, though each player shines. What's impressive, like on all of this quintet's sessions, is the interplay, how the musicians follow an unpredictable path as a unit, turning in music that is always searching, always provocative, and never boring. Perhaps Nefertiti's charms are a little more subtle than those of its predecessors, but that makes it intriguing. Besides, this album so clearly points the way to fusion, while remaining acoustic, that it may force listeners on either side of the fence into another direction." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • New studio album from the kings of doom and gloom features "semi-acoustic" interpretations of classic Anathema tunes plus a new track.
    $14.00
  • "At Vance have been around since 1998, and since then they have started have released 8 albums and 2 compilations, and they are now about to release “Facing Your Enemy”.The current line up consist of guitarist and original founding member Olaf Lenk, vocalist Rick Altzi, bassist “Wolfman” Black and Drummer Alex Landenburg.“Heaven Is Calling” kicks off this album, the galloping beat accompanied by technical guitar riffs and powerful vocals lead the listener into the album and gives just a small idea as to what the rest of the album will be like.“Facing Your Enemy”, the title track on this album, starts with an almost industrial feel before the guitars then begin their chorus and the vocals kick in and a truly powerful song is born. A power ballad that makes you want to raise your glass to the sky and sing along. You can see why they chose this song as the title track.“Eyes Of A Stranger” jumps into gear with opening riffs reminiscent of “Suicide Solution” by Ozzy Osbourne, before heading straight to their roots that is power metal, reminding you of fellow bands Primal Fear and Angels Of Babylon. This song leads perfectly into “Fear No Evil” which slows the pace but includes strong vocal lead choruses.“Live and Learn” explodes through the speakers, once again with a heavy Ozzy sounding opening riff, a voice pierces through the guitars and another great song takes hold. “Don’t Dream” and “Seeing Me Crying” are the two slowest songs on the album and lulls the listener into a false sense of security because when “Saviour” kicks in with traditional power metal the listener is rocked to the foundation.“Tokyo” takes you away on a helicopter ride, with synth, panpipes and a tale of falling in love with a Japanese girl. This is certainly a love song with a difference. An AOR sounding song that still fits in perfectly on this album. We are then met with “March of the Dwarf” which is the only instrumental on this album, but shows off the talents of the guitarist, bassist and the drummer.At Vance don’t stay away from power metal for long when “Fame and Fortune” bursts into life. We are then sadly come to the last song on the album “Things I Never Needed”. It is a definite contrast to anything else on this album. A slow, acoustic song it really does show the versatility of these talented musicians.It’s not hard to see why this band is still around and still going strong, and I for one cannot wait to see what their next album has in store." - Planet Mosh
    $15.00
  • Excellent debut release from this progressive folk band from Italy.  The band is led by multi-instrumentalist Valerio Smaldoni who sings (in English) and plays keyboards and some guitar.  The music has a definite prog flavor particularly from the keyboard work - some nice atmospheric Mellotron-type sounds as well as Mini-moog soloing.  Guitarwork is acoustic based that never gets overly agressive.  I'm reminded of Celeste and W&W period Genesis.  This is the kind of thing I can listen to as a Sunday morning wake up call.  
    $18.00
  • "From December 1971 to April 1972, Carlos Santana and several other members of Santana toured with drummer/vocalist Buddy Miles, a former member of the Electric Flag, and Jimi Hendrix's Band of Gypsys. The resulting live album contained both Santana hits ("Evil Ways") and Buddy Miles hits ("Changes"), plus a 25-minute, side-long jam. It was not, perhaps, the live album Santana fans had been waiting for, but at this point in its career, the band could do no wrong. The album went into the Top Ten and sold a million copies." - All Music Guide
    $7.00
  • "Gäa was one of the more obscure German underground bands from the 70s.  They recorded one album for the Kerston label.  According to legend, after the album was released, many copies were destroyed due to poor sales.  Of course this has driven the price of an original copy into the stratosphere.The five piece had a sound a bit similar to early Eloy.  Lots of organ, some flute, but more importantly some of the most wicked Hendrix influenced leads you will hear.  Whip it all together with production that sounds like it was recorded in a massive echo chamber and you've got a winner.  A stone cold killer." - ProgArchives
    $18.00
  • "It’s Canadian to do things in an unorthodox fashion. Not like there’s anything wrong with it (there isn’t), and when it comes to metal, all one needs to do is look at the long list of prominent Canadian bands and it makes sense: Voivod, Kataklysm, Neuraxis, Cryptopsy, etc., etc. None of them bothered to do anything by the book, resulting in some of metal’s most expansive and off-kilter sounds. In the mix is Montreal’s Heaven’s Cry, who are returning after a seven-year hiatus with their third album, Wheels of Impermanence.A band of the progressive/power variety, Heaven’s Cry function largely in their own sphere, with perhaps the only real comparison being Perfect Symmetry/Parallels-era Fates Warning. This means that wacky time signatures, weird chord movements, and initially hard-to-digest songs come to the fore, making Wheels of Impermanence sound…very Canadian (FW is not Canadian, though). Nevertheless, there’s an assortment of quirky riff action going down here, rolling up into songs that for the most part, have some guile to them, such as opener “Empire’s Doll” and “The Mad Machine.”Singer Pierre St. Jean has a solid AOR caw to him, one that is occasionally ill-fitting for the band’s malleable music. That doesn’t prevent him from unfurling some adventurous vocal takes, as heard on the title track and “Consequence,” where he benefits greatly from back-up gang vocals and spurts of melodic guitars. Ultimately, St. Jean is able to cross the ever-difficult divide between power metal majesty and progressive metal over-thinking. He’s absolutely stellar.Evidently, Heaven’s Cry reformed at the right time, able to catch the attention of Prosthetic Records for the release of Wheels. Not to be forgotten is the inclusion of guitarist Eric Jarrin, who used to do time in deathcore merchants Despised Icon, which again, breeds additional peculiarity with this one. Canadians…they are a tricky bunch. " - Blistering.com
    $12.00
  • Third album from this orchestral prog band, recorded in 1971. This remastered edition comes with six bonus tracks and new liner notes.
    $11.00
  • A new release from Causa Sui is like money in the bank.  The new Live At Freak Valley is no exception.  The live milieu is where the band really shines.  If you are unfamilar with the band you should know that the band's origins date back to the stoner scene but they evolved into something different - something more psychedelic - more organic.  The quartet features Jakob Skott (drums), Jonas Munk (guitar), Jess Kahr (bass), and Rasmus Rasmussen (keyboards).  The band goes off on looooong instrumental jams.  Munk's guitarwork has a beautiful fluidity that plays off of Rasmussen's keyboards which tend to surge to the forefront like waves on the ocean - or sit back and become a nice supporting backdrop for Munk's lead work.  I love when Munk burst out with a chunk of heavy riffage that recalls their stoner days.  Reminds me of vintage Zeppelin!  Highly recommended.
    $35.00
  • "I’ve only just got hold of this one, but it’s jumped to the top of my review list on the basis of being awesome. Being off ill at the start of the week, I had a significant pile of demos and promos to download at the weekend and I was ploughing through them. I always give a couple of tracks off each album a very quick listen just so I know what genre they are.Being a puerile child at heart, I obviously picked “Fuck You” out from the tracklist on Nightglow’s latest release and was immediately blown away. It’s a heavy song, full of groove and rhythm with harsh yet understandable lyrics.OK, so a lucky choice. Let’s pick… erm… “Scream”. That sound good. And it is. As was “On My Knees”, “Psychotropic” and every other song on Orpheus. What started as a quick check of the mp3s turned into two full listens to the album.Nightglow have been kicking around since 1998, but didn’t become Nightglow until 2003. Up until 2013 they were primarily a live band playing their own music, covers of songs by classic acts (Maiden, Priest and the like) and also enjoyed a stint as the official Italian Manowar tribute act!Metal credentials well and truly approved, the band finally released their first album, We Rise, in 2013. Obviously by now the band had a wealth of their own material so it only took another 18 months or so before the follow-up, Orpheus, was announced.This is a great album. Totally unpretentious, balls-out heavy metal. It doesn’t seem to take itself too seriously, remembering that metal is about having fun and being loud! Oh, and doing the stock power ballad (“Stay With Me”)." -  The Moshville Times
    $13.00