Stanley Clarke ($5 Blowout Price!)

SKU: EK36973
Label:
Epic
Category:
Fusion
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Second solo album from the legendary RTF bassist, originally released in 1974. Its a burning set featuring Jan Hammer and Tony Williams. Oh yeah...a guy name Bill Connors is playing guitar and going off his nut.

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  • Brief Nocturnes is the band's 11th album.  It marks their return to Inside Out and quite frankly its the best album they have released in a very long time.  Chalk it up to Ted Leonard handling vocals or Neal Morse contributing writing to a couple of tunes?  Not sure.  I am definitely hearing more vitality and overt progginess in the compositions.  Ryo is going off his nut here - keys are whizzing all around - organ/'tron/the whole schmear - and Alan's guitar runs are matching him step for step.  Maybe I haven't been paying attention as closely as I should have for the past few years.  I do know that I'm enjoying the hell out of this.  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • This is where the progressive elements really start to coalesce ie. the 20 minute "The Fountain Of Lamneth".  Remastered edition.
    $5.00
  • Deluxe remastered edition features a bonus of 3 live tracks from 1973 consisting of Future City (!!), Castle In The Air, and Flying High
    $13.00
  • This is a real curious sounding band. AtomA is a Swedish trio consisting of three former members of a band called Slumber. If I could whip up a categorization for AtomA I would file these guys under "space metal". The lead singer is also the band's keyboardist. Synthesizers play a significant role in this band. The overall vibe is this epic but diffused soundscape - almost orchestra. Guitars are actually mixed down. Vocals are mainly clean with a little bit of death thrown in for accent. A totally weird hybrid of space rock, shoe gazer, post rock, and doom metal.
    $5.00
  • "There's nothing subtle about Infinita Symphonia and their approach to power metal; after all they are from Italy. Their sophomore effort, simply self-titled, finds the band stirring up more bombastic arrangements with big riffage to grand orchestral layers to large vocal arrangements.Yet within all this lavish wall of sound, Infinita Symphonia is still able to offer some good rock groove, as on If I Could Go Back, and elements of progressive power metal, as with The Last Breath, Limbo, the two longest pieces, but also Fly, by example. That latter song also features a guest vocal appearance by the talent Michael Kiske (Helloween, Unisonic, et al).Yet, it's not always flash and spectacle. Following Fly is the instrumental piece, Interlude, which tones things down with more delicate play. This follows into the greater part of Waiting For a Day of Happiness, which puts Luca Micioni vocals at the fore. Of course, it eventually comes to a crescendo at the end. Alternatively, the anthem In Your Eyes, featuring a duet with Daniela Gualano, remains mostly smooth and steady. All this amounts to nearly 74 minutes of music, nothing subtle about that either. Infinita Symphonia returns with another fine album. Easily recommended." - Dangerdog.com
    $6.00
  • This is the fifth and last in Ian Parry's Consortium Project all star project. Returning vets include Stefan Lill (Vanden Plas), Kristopher Gildenlow, Casey Grillo (Kamelot) among others. Parry is front and center but also augmented by female vocalists Lena Petersen and Ani Lozanova (Ani Lo Project).
    $14.00
  • In 1974, Jethro Tull announced plans for WarChild, a multi-faceted project that was to encompass a feature-length film, a soundtrack album, as well a new album from the band. In October of that year, Tull released a 10-song album that would climb to #2 in the U.S. and the top 15 in the U.K., but the film and accompanying soundtrack were shelved. To commemorate the 40-year anniversary of this ambitious experiment, Parlophone revisits WarChild.WARCHILD: THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY THEATRE EDITION will be available as a limited edition 2-CD/2-DVD set on November 25 2014.Highlights from the set include:- Original album and bonus tracks (three previously unreleased), remixed in 5.1 surround and stereo by Steven Wilson.- 10 orchestral pieces (nine previously unreleased) written for the film s soundtrack, 4 of which are remixed in 5.1 surround and stereo by Steven Wilson.- Flat transfers of the original LP mix at 96/24, and the quadrophonic version (with 2 bonus tracks) in 4.0.- The Third Hoorah promo footage, and footage from a January 1974 photo session/press conference where the WarChild project was announced.- An 80-page booklet featuring an extensive history of the project, a film script synopsis, track-by-track annotations by Ian Anderson, plus rare and unseen photographs.
    $45.00
  • Recorded out in Los Angeles. Not one of their better albums.
    $10.00
  • "After the breakup of Deep Purple in 1976, guitarist Tommy Bolin wasted little time beginning work on his second solo album, Private Eyes. While it was more of a conventional rock album than its predecessor, Teaser (which served primarily as a showcase for his guitar skills and contained several jazz/rock instrumentals), it was not as potent. The performances aren't as inspired as those on Teaser or even those on Bolin's lone album with Deep Purple, Come Taste the Band, although there a few highlights could be found. The nine-minute rocker "Post Toastee" merges a long jam section with lyrics concerning the dangers of drug addiction, while "Shake the Devil" is similar stylistically. But Bolin wasn't simply a hard-rocker; he was extremely talented with other kinds of music: the quiet, acoustic-based compositions "Hello, Again" and "Gypsy Soul," and the heartbroken ballad "Sweet Burgundy." With his solo career starting to take shape (after the album's release, he opened for some of rock's biggest names: Peter Frampton, Jeff Beck, Rush, ZZ Top, etc.), Bolin's life was tragically cut short at the end of the year due to a drug overdose in Miami, FL." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • This superb Swedish band follow up their white hot performance at Nearfest with the release of their fifth album and its their best. The band really has developed their own identity. There is an underpinning of humor but at the same time the lyrics don't deal with unicorns and magical forests - in fact there is plenty of heavy duty swear words through out so if that is offensive to you stay clear. Its a musical monster with devastating organ work - check out the closer "The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of" (my dreams ARE made of this stuff!). In general the musical talent is mega-high and full on display here. Oh yeah - for about 10 seconds the Cookie Monster rears his head so watch out!!One of the finest (if not THE finest) example of contemporary progressive rock. Beardfish give a wink and a nod to the old timers but clearly have carved out a path of their own that ANY fan (with a strong heart) should endorse. This will make everyone's top 10 list at year end. BUY OR DIE!!
    $11.00
  • "To be in a band remotely related to the realms of Progressive and Power, is to be an immensely accomplished instrumentalist in your own right. However, it is all too easy for entire bands to be lost in the sea of generic driven mass, regardless of the title of 'progressive', swamped in unusual and atonal melodic progressions and multi-rhythmic drumming. Sometimes even the lyrics can become a drawl; who wants to hear about the same knight fighting the same dragon across 10 different bands? This is where Floridians SKYLINER come into play, ablaze with fresh ideologies, tried-and-true Power Metal establishments with Progressive embellishments, and very real lyrical philosophies.The intro track blew me away with its eerie soundscape and powerful vocal delivery, not unlike a cross between VOLBEAT's Michael Poulsen and ex-ICED EARTH vocalist Matthew Barlow. Pulling no punches is "Symphony in Black" delivering a speedy and uplifting cascade of riffs steeped in creative melodies. Jake delivers a unique vocal effort, sticking to an aggressive Heavy Metal approach with unusual, yet catchy inflections in his melodies. "Forever Young" is a powerful track that hits home with passages evolving in both speed and technicality, with abrupt crescendos marked by drastic blast-offs in tempo; an incredibly solid track with creative drumming and even more diverse vocal performances.I would devote a significant portion of my writing towards the epic "Worlds of Conflict", wherein the lads "pulled a DREAM THEATER" and wrote an enormous, 21-minute track. Rarely does one hear something of such epic proportions. Never stale, it seamlessly weaves in and out of passages of their own individuality that coalesce into powerful crescendos, or on the other hand may diverge into various sentient soundscapes. The bass work in this track is thoroughly impressive, going past a meat-and-potatoes approach to offer an astounding array of dynamics to add to a track that would ordinarily require a great amount of fleshing-out. I stress, this is not something you would chuck on to fit the mood. Absorb it, and embrace it.Individually, the tracks are excellent. The 21 minute monster is at a masterpiece level, I cannot get enough of it. If I had a single qualm it would be that each of the tracks are 'too' different from the next, that the album feels more like a collection of works as opposed to, well, an 'album'. But then, I could be wrong; I could be too used to listening to 2-hour, drawlish concept albums. It is my belief that the end product was their 100% intention. They have done this right." - Metal Temple
    $15.00
  • "Accept's creative breakthrough, 1983's Restless and Wild, begins with one of the most unexpected, surprising, and hilarious mock intros ever recorded. Untold thousands no doubt furrowed their brows in confusion at the perky German folk song emanating from their speakers, only to be rudely interrupted by a scratching needle and Udo Dirkschneider's incomparable shriek, as the band launch themselves into the stunning violence of "Fast as a Shark." Not just a thrilling, light-speed juggernaut, the song was probably the last thrash metal prototype waxed in the pre-thrash era (officially inaugurated by Metallica's Kill 'Em All a few months later). Though nowhere near as frenetic, the title track and "Ahead of the Pack" are just as fierce, and despite a sudden stumble with the mediocre "Shake Your Heads" (an overtly cheesy, Judas Priest-style metal anthem, and the album's only stinker), the dramatic "Neon Nights" ends side one on the upswing once again. As for the album's second half, it's pretty much beyond reproach. Introduced by the solid "Get Ready" (another nod to Priest with its "Living After Midnight"-inspired drum intro), it builds from strength to strength with increasingly mature and melodic (though lyrically obscure) tracks such as "Flash Rockin' Man," "Don't Go Stealing My Soul Away," and the colossal "Princess of the Dawn." The latter closes the album as it began, in unexpected fashion, when its extended outro is abruptly interrupted mid-verse. The bottom line here is that this, like its successor Balls to the Wall, is an essential heavy metal album, and any fan worth his salt should own them both. But for the sake of first-time visitors, Restless and Wild is the slightly grittier, less melodic of the two. Whichever you chose, you can only win." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • "Dog & Butterfly became Heart's fourth million-selling album and placed two songs of opposing styles in the Top 40. Like their Magazine album, Dog & Butterfly peaked at number 17 on the charts, but the material from it is much stronger from every standpoint, with Anne and Nancy Wilson involving themselves to a greater extent. The light, afternoon feel of the title track peaked at number 34, while the more resounding punch of "Straight On" went all the way to number 15 as the album's first single. With keyboard player Howard Leese making his presence felt, and the vocals and guitar work sounding fuller and more focused, the band seems to be rather comfortable once again. Average bridge-and-chorus efforts like "Cook with Fire" and "High Time" aren't spectacular, but they do emit some appeal as far as filler is concerned, while "Lighter Touch" may be the best of the uncharted material. After this album, guitarist Roger Fisher left the band, but Heart didn't let up. 1980's Bebe le Strange showed an even greater improvement, peaking at number five in April of that year." - All Music GuideRemasetered version with 3 bonus tracks.
    $8.00
  • Third album from this very fine Irish neo-progressive band.  Dead Heroes Club have that traditional sound down.  Frontman Liam Campbell's voice has an uncanny resemblance to Fish and Peter Gabriel (which one depends on the tune).  This one is ripped right out of the Clutching At Straws playbook but the band tends to stretch out a bit more.  I also noticed that the guitar is cranked up a bit more than in the past.  Good stuff.
    $15.00