Saturnine ($3 Special)

SKU: PRR760
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Progrock Records
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Second release from this German band and frankly its a huge improvement from their debut. Dante skirt the fine line between neoprogressive rock and progressive metal. The music is quite melodic and there is some heaviness in the guitarwork...and yeah the keyboardist likes to shred like Jordan does...so maybe they can slip into the metal category. File these guys along side Ricochet.

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 10:00
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0
Another gem , Keys galour, All around fantastic release .Openning tracks sets the stange for a multiple listen disc......Get it...B.Ricci.
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 10:00
Rate: 
0
Another gem , Keys galour, All around fantastic release .Openning tracks sets the stange for a multiple listen disc......Get it...B.Ricci.
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