Relayer (CD/Blu-ray)

SKU: GYRBD50096
Label:
Panegyric
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Of all the Yes albums that needed a remix this is the one that needed it the most!

"Relayer (1974) is the third in a series of remixed and expanded Yes albums.

Presented in a mini vinyl replica gatefold card sleeve (with protective inner sleeves) with booklet featuring new sleeve notes by Sid Smith, along with rare photos and archive material, the album has been remixed into stereo and 5.1 Surround Sound from the original studio masters by Steven Wilson and is fully approved by Yes.

The blu-ray also contains the original album mix in high-resolution, a complete alternate album running order drawn from demos and studio run-throughs. Additional exclusive Blu-Ray features include extra demo/studio run-throughs, full album instrumental mixes, a full album needle-drop of an original UK A1/B1 vinyl pressing, single edits, live tracks, and needle-drops of the banded tracks from the original US vinyl promo album.

Restored artwork approved by Roger Dean, the release of which coincides with the 40th anniversary of the album’s original late 1974 appearance."

Product Review

timhallbooks3
Sat, 2015-02-07 04:52
Rate: 
0
Of the three remixed Yes blu-rays, this was probably my least favorite in its original form. It's also the album that has benefited the most from Steve Wilson's remarkable work. The clarity of these new editions goes far beyond what I had become accustomed to with generic "remasters"--a remix is a completely different process, far more labor-intensive, using the original multitrack tapes. The results are spectacular. I bought a 5.1 surround system specifically to listen to the CTTE remix, and now I'm eyeing $500 Oppo players to match the beauty of these recordings. By the time I'm done these discs will have cost me a thousand dollars, LOL, but I'm not complaining. Also, I've bought all three Yes blu-ray remixes from Laser's Edge and the price and service is great. Highly recommended.
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Product Review

timhallbooks3
Sat, 2015-02-07 04:52
Rate: 
0
Of the three remixed Yes blu-rays, this was probably my least favorite in its original form. It's also the album that has benefited the most from Steve Wilson's remarkable work. The clarity of these new editions goes far beyond what I had become accustomed to with generic "remasters"--a remix is a completely different process, far more labor-intensive, using the original multitrack tapes. The results are spectacular. I bought a 5.1 surround system specifically to listen to the CTTE remix, and now I'm eyeing $500 Oppo players to match the beauty of these recordings. By the time I'm done these discs will have cost me a thousand dollars, LOL, but I'm not complaining. Also, I've bought all three Yes blu-ray remixes from Laser's Edge and the price and service is great. Highly recommended.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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