Persistence Of Time ($5 Special)

SKU: 422-846 480-2
Label:
Island
Category:
Thrash Metal
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"Album number four for New York metal thrashing extraordinaire's Anthrax. Persistence of Time used to be my favorite Anthrax album, and even though I give the edge to Spreading the Disease I still rate this one highly, and I prefer it to the likes of Among the Living.

Persistence of Time has the distinction of being Anthrax's most accomplished release, well, as far as musicianship and performances go. The band decided to take themselves seriously here and this album feels right at home amongst the Victims of Deception, Years of Decay, Twisted Into Form crowd. A lot of the bands slight crossover element is largely missing, with the exception of the "Got The Time" cover, which serves as highly beneficial to the release.

The tracks are quite a bit longer than usual here, with the opening four numbers swimming a see of six - seven minute tracks. Anthrax really deliver over the longer time periods and the songs are given a lot more room to grow. When concerning production I feel that by todays standards Persistence of Time happens to stand up the best amongst the bands work with Joey Belladonna. The mix is fantastic, and the bass has a great prominent sound which as a result leaves this album sounding the heaviest of the Anthrax backlog.

"Time", "Blood" and "Keep it in the Family" are all massive in scope as far as Anthrax goes, and these songs are among some of the best the band have done. From the darker edged riffs, to the build up and dynamics this is all good. "Keep it in the Family" is a particularly awesome example of Anthrax ala Persistence of Time. Not to blow their wad in the first half of the album we have the awesome "Gridlock" which houses some of Anthrax's most menacing work, and the bad-ass "Belly of the Beast". Proabably the catchiest track on the album (not including the cover), this was actually the first Anthrax song I ever heard, and has some fond memories attached to it.

Persistence of Time is a really cool release, and is reflective of its given genre at the time. Thrash was pushing forward in quite an exciting way, yet somehow it all went wrong. Even now when we have a fuck load of caricature thrash bands, none of them try to progress like Anthrax did here. Despite the niggling "Got The Time" the rest of the album is awesome and is of interest of any thrash fan, especially those with interest in the later releases around the late 80's early 90's." - Metal Archives

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