Parallels (2CD/DVD Expanded Edition)

Newly remastered set includes a bonus disc with a live recording at the The Palace in Hollywood from 1/23/92. Also included is pre-production demos. To sweeten the pot Metal Blade includes a DVD witha complete gig from New Haven, Ct on 2/13/92 as well as a "making of Parallels" documentary and 2 video clips. Cheap too!!

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
Fates Warning and Prog Metal fans in general: don't hesitate in getting this. The remaster sounds a bit crispier and brighter compared to the original release. The live material itself is worth it. The documentary gives a great insight on what Parallels meant to the band. Some other interesting facts are revealed by Jim and band mates as well. This was FW most successful album commercially speaking, but for some reason it just didn't take off as expected by everybody. Great hooks, great melodies, great music...Recommended! OQ
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
Fates Warning and Prog Metal fans in general: don't hesitate in getting this. The remaster sounds a bit crispier and brighter compared to the original release. The live material itself is worth it. The documentary gives a great insight on what Parallels meant to the band. Some other interesting facts are revealed by Jim and band mates as well. This was FW most successful album commercially speaking, but for some reason it just didn't take off as expected by everybody. Great hooks, great melodies, great music...Recommended! OQ
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The inhabitants of the idyllic island practice such spiritual, philosophical models, culminating in the consumption of so-called “Moksha-medicine,” a hallucinogen which permits heightened awareness and understanding. The band which explores similarly Zen and reflective topics is one to catch my eye and I excitedly embarked on this quest for internal liberation.Moksha is the fifth full-length by Germany’s My Sleeping Karma, succeeding their previous release Soma (also a reference to Eastern spirituality and prominently interpreted in Huxley’s Brave New World). It accordingly incorporates Eastern instrumentation in a groovy, psychedelic exploration of exactly how mellow one can be while the music can still be interpreted as metal. Though it could be described as relaxing mood music, the distorted guitars and surprising technical proficiency of the band grounds Moksha in the space between rock and metal (and also qualifies it for AMG, you goddamned haters).If Kraut or psychedelic rock is your jam then you will assuredly find plenty to enjoy here. The minimalist approach with sparingly-used instruments and catchy but repetitive leads will worm its way into your skull. There aren’t multiple riffs throughout each song; rather, a core motif which gradually progresses and develops throughout, lending a charming coherency to the album – see opener “Prithvi” for this. Occasional synths and piano keys afford an ethereal air too. However, it’s the points at which more overt Eastern instrumentation is used that the material really stands out. The five “Interlude”s which split each of the main songs strongly evoke My Brother The Wind, with groovy bass-lines and the interesting use of monk’s chants and hand-operated drums. 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I don’t say this often, but this song for me is near perfection, everything fits together so well.With the tone set, the album digs into telling the story in full, with a spectrum of styles and paces. It truly is a musical narrative, events and emotions ebb and flow throughout the album.  The next song, Union, takes on a softer tone, adding an organized edge to the metal. It is catchy as hell, and sets a silent fervor in motion for The Fall, which has epic all over it. All hands are in play in this one, another searing track that leaves the listener breathless.The album carries on in this fashion throughout its entirety. The multitude of musical styles and themes are performed wonderfully by every member of the band. Lonobile is a monster at lead, and Pastarino carries a heavy load on rhythm superbly. The drumming is frantic yet precise, the fills and rolls just fantastic. 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