Out Of The Darkness

Out Of The Darkness

BY A Sound Of Thunder

(Customer Reviews)
$13.00
$ 7.80
SKU: 884501625739
Label:
Private Release
Category:
Power Metal
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"Dangerdog has been inundated with female led metal bands since the beginning of the year. Here's another one: A Sound of Thunder, from Washington DC, with Nina Osegueda at the microphone. Out of the Darkness is their second release.

Thankfully, Ms. Osegueda and the band don't fall into the operatic symphonic metal category, nor the weepy melancholy of gothic metal, although I'm sure she could easily do both. And, believe it or not, there's no moron offering death growl accents. This is pure, no bullshit, classic American heavy metal, equally vital in the Eighties as much as it's need today.

For Nina's part, think a mix of Dickinson, Halford, and Dio in metal diva form. Or for something more outlandish, imagine if country singer Faith Hill went metal. (Listen to the opener, The Day I Die, and you may hear what I mean.) Osegueda will probably laugh at that comparison.

Otherwise, from start to finish, Out of the Darkness kicks serious metal ass. It's an unexpected pleasure of traditional metal genius. ASoT can be fervent and blistering as on Murderous Horde, epic and inspiring as on Calat Alhambra, or unexpected and glorious on Discovery. Then they bring the groove (and psychotic girlfriend) on the catchy and fun, Kill That Bitch. Throughout Osegueda shows her effortless vocal strength, control, and range; take note of how easily she dials it down on the ballad, This Too Shall Pass. Look out boys, the next great metal singer is here.

A Sound of Thunder's Out of the Darkness is premium, kick ass, classic heavy metal. " - DangerDog.com

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