Original Album Series (5CD)

SKU: 25646362059
Label:
Parlophone
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Budget priced 5CD set in a slimline package that contains the following albums:

Joy Of A Toy
Shooting At The Moon
Whatevershebringswesing
Bananamour
The Confessions Of Dr. Dream And Other Stories

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  • This one is a great deal. Small slipcase edition of the five remastered Soft Machine albums: Third through Seven. Albums are in simple jackets with cover art (there is a link to a website with full album credits). Comes out to 5 bucks a disc - can't beat that!
    $22.00
  • To celebrate the 40th anniversary of Machine Head, Eagle has put together an all-star tribute to one of the greatest hard rock/metal albums of all time.   Check out this lineup: 1. Smoke On The Water - Carlos Santana & Jacoby Shaddix2. Highway Star - Chickenfoot3. Maybe I'm A Leo - Glenn Hughes & Chad Smith4. Pictures Of Home - Black Label Society5. Never Before - Kings Of Chaos: Joe Elliott, Steve Stevens, Duff McKagan, Matt Sorum6. Smoke On The Water - Flaming Lips7. Lazy - Jimmy Barnes with Joe Bonamassa8. Space Truckin - Iron Maiden9. When A Blind Man Cries - Metallica
    $11.00
  • OK WE GOT A HOT ONE HERE!  Latest album from keyboard maestro Lalle Larsson is full-on balls to the wall fusion.  He's hooked up again with Richard Hallebeek, who is one of the great Holdsworth clones out there.  The rest of the band is Stefan Rosqvist (rhythm guitar), Jonas Reingold (bass), and Walle Wahlgren (drums).  Larsson lays down lethal synth leads and swaps back and forth with Hallebeek who matches him with dexterous legato runs.    Time will tell but I think this may be Lalle Larsson's best solo album yet!  Highly recommended.
    $16.00
  • Deluxe mediabook edition.  CD plus a DVD with 5.1 surround mix, 24 bit stereo, and a "making of" video."Always fond of conceptual storytelling, Ian Anderson goes himself one better with his latest prog-folk-metal concept album. The 15 songs of Homo Erraticus inhabit not one but two metafictional layers. The Gerald Bostock character, hero/anti-hero of the seminal Jethro Tull album Thick as a Brick and its recent sequel Thick as a Brick 2, is back again, having now discovered a manuscript left behind in the 1920s by a malaria-ridden old British soldier delightfully named Ernest T. Parritt.Parritt's supposed writings range over northern European history from the Mesolithic era to his own - and on into his future, through the whole 20th century and into our own time and beyond. Winnowed into lyrics written by "Bostock" and set to music by the real protagonist of the story, Ian Anderson, these materials give Anderson - whose creative scope and energy remain robust even as his singing voice has thinned with age - a walk-in-closetful of pegs on which to hang a sequence of songs evoking nothing less than the history of mankind in his part of the world.The first track, "Doggerland," commemorates the area of the southern North Sea that used to be dry land connecting today's British Isles with the rest of Europe. Doggerland vanished under the waves as the last Ice Age ended but, as fisherman discovered not long ago, the sea floor retains much archeological evidence of human occupation. The succeeding songs address migrations, metalworking, invasions (from the Romans to Burger King), the arrival of Christianity, the Industrial Revolution, and so on. To appreciate the songs, you'll want to (at least once) follow along with the notes and lyrics in the accompanying 32-page booklet.The Foreword, in which Anderson discusses the history of Jethro Tull and why he hasn't used the band name for his last few recordings, will especially interest longtime Tull fans. The real question is, will the songs themselves? Some yes, some no. The gruff metal of "Doggerland" gives way to the sweet, plinking folk of "Heavy Metals." (I imagine Anderson chuckling to himself at the irony - no pun intended - of creating such a gentle-sounding song with that title, and on that literal topic.) Both satisfy my Tull craving. "Meliora Sequamur" (Let Us Follow Better Things), which paints a picture of 12th century schoolboys amid religious chant (and cant), does too, and "The Turnpike Inn" is a solid rocker, and the hard-Celtic style of "The Engineer" moves briskly.I like the instrumental track "Tripudium ad Bellum" (Dancing to War). It starts off with an echo of a theme from the original Thick as a Brick (there are others elsewhere on the album), then resolves into a 5/4 march, like a more insistent "Living in the Past." War's aftermath appears in the next track, the sad, deliberate "After These Wars," in which I really feel the lack of Anderson's full-strength vocals. While he was never among rock's greatest singers, that didn't matter - when he sang his songs, you always felt he was all there, and that's what mattered. But now, and not only in the harder songs that shade into old-school heavy metal, his voice just isn't always a match for his music's energy any more.On the other hand, his gift for crafting pleasing, original melodies, writing smart, clever lyrics in complete sentences and true rhyme, and setting much of it in non-traditional time signatures remains strong. The first verse of "After These Wars" reads:After battle, with wounds to lick andbeaus and belles all reuniting.Rationing, austerity: it did us good after the fighting.Now, time to bid some fond farewells andwalk away from empires crumbling.Post-war baby-boom to fuel with post-Victorian half-dressed fumbling.No one in pop music writes like that anymore.Listening to the album as a complete conceptual work, my overall feeling is that there isn't very much new here. Since the 1960s Anderson and Tull have explored countless different musical paths and styles. Some of these produced some of my all-time favorite songs and recordings. Others I hated. But he never seemed to be resting on his laurels. Here I feel like I'm reading a chapter that's not much different from the last chapter.But listening to the songs individually, I like a lot of them. As I write this I'm trying to count the beats of the off-time closer, "Cold Dead Reckoning," with its grim imagery of a future of lost souls navigating their way over a metaphysical Doggerland "amongst the ranks and files of walking dead." I hear crunching minor-key guitar-bass-piano unison figures, a sprightly flute solo. A hopeful verse about "angels watching over" at the end doesn't convince me, as the music continues to growl on as before. Yet there follow a sweet, gentle instrumental coda, reminded us that while things may not turn out well for humanity as we teem over and ruin our only planet, our capacity to create and to appreciate beauty will be with us as long as we live. So let's raise the cup of crimson wonder to Ian Anderson as he charges not-so-gently through his seventh decade." - Seattle Pi
    $17.00
  • Mr. Holdsworth split the scene with the guitar role recast by his old replacement John Etheridge. Changing names from "Soft Works" to "Soft Machine Legacy", the band played a brief European tour early in 2005. Mr. Etheridge isn't exactly a slouch in the six-string department and he blends in quite well with Elton Dean, Hugh Hopper, and John Marshall. Although this 51 minute disc only features a portion of their live set there are some nicely played renditions of old chestnuts like "Kings & Queens" as well as newer material.
    $13.00
  • "Why was David Fricke, Senior Editor at Rolling Stone, seen wearing a huge grin on his face at 2014's SXSW festival in Austin, Texas? Well, he happened to be digging the pummeling, ecstatic vision of Norway's Hedvig Mollestad Trio at the time. Double-tracked with a ghostly haze of background fuzz, Hedvig's lightning-rod guitar blazes a trail that comes in the wake of the heaviest guitar giants -- there's Hendrix, Black Sabbath's Tony Iommi and Led Zep's Jimmy Page swirling around the cauldron, but also the exploratory, disciplined free-play of Pete Cosey, John McLaughlin and Carlos Santana buzzing out of her fingertips. Born in the Norwegian town of Ålesund in the early '80s, Hedvig Mollestad Thomassen has been steeped in the guitar since fooling around with her mother's nylon-string acoustic at the age of 10. Together with drummer Ivar Loe Bjørnstad and bassist Ellen Brekken, and recording with an 8-track tape machine, her Trio turn the full force of heavy rock and electric jazz to demonic purposes. It can be sledgehammer sludge, stoned to a crawl as on "Arigato, Bitch." Or it's nimble as a phantom on "Rastapopoulos," a dizzying churn that's named after the archvillain of Hergé's Tintin cartoons. And for the Mollestad Trio at its intuitive, ESP-connected finest, check "Liquid Bridges." "Laughing John" gestures towards the great Mahavishnu Orchestra guitarist as well as a music teacher, named Jon, who heavily influenced Hedvig's development. The album's fine balance between looseness and control follows a year of world touring, and tracks reflect such odd venues as "La Boule Noire," a former Portuguese disco in Paris whose walls are studded with bullets from a gangland shootout. Enfant Terrible follows the Trio's previous Rune Grammofon releases, the Spellemann (Norwegian Grammy) nominated All of Them Witches (RCD 2141CD/ RLP 3141LP) and Shoot! (RCD 2115CD/ RLP 3115LP) and, like label-mates Bushman's Revenge, Elephant9 and Grand General, represent a thrilling new progressive wave of Norwegian avant-rock/free-metal energy. Don't be fooled by the deceptively innocent portrait of Hedvig herself on the front cover -- a rare example of designer Kim Hiorthøy working with classic black and white photography, and an unusual departure from Rune Grammofon's familiar digipacks. Enfants terribles are a disturbance of the peace. But the regular enfants terribles make changes, they are creative, they force you to think differently. This Enfant Terrible is one of those."
    $18.00
  • Second album from this Norwegian blonde temptress that plays the bejeezus out of the guitar.  Hedvig Mollestad may be familiar to you from her participation in El Doom & The Born Electric.  She happens to have a smokin' hot instrumental trio as well.  She wears her influences on her sleeve - at times you can hear distinct inferences to Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix, Robert Fripp, and Tony Iommi.  The music has a definite 70s flavor - think in terms of a great Led Zeppelin jam session.  Interestingly enough the label categorizes this as "avant rock/free metal".  Sounds like the good old hard rock I grew up with.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • New neo-prog side project from Collage/Satellite drummer Wojtek Szadkowski. The music has a modern sheen with plenty of stunt guitar work from Radek Chwieralski. To these ears the band doesn't sound at all like either Collage or Satellite (which makes sense I suppose - otherwise what would be the point). Some nice wiggly keyboard solos but this is mostly about the guitar.
    $15.00
  • This is a 2DVD set culled from Pete York's German TV specials focusing on great drummers. These shows were broadcast in 1987-1989. Featured performers include Bill Bruford, Simon Philips, Bill Cobham, Louie Bellson, Dave Mattacks, Jon Hiseman, and many many more. The backing bands are quite phenomenal - Brian Auger, Wolfgang Schmidt, Peter Woelpl, Miller Anderson, Colin Hodgkinson, Eddie Hardin, Jon Lord (!), and others.
    $18.00
  • Import digipak edition!"2014 live album the King Crimson spin-off. Featuring the talents of Adrian Belew, Tony Levin, Pat Mastelotto, Markus Reuter, Julie Slick and Tobias Ralph; The Crimson ProjeKCT primarily focus on repertoire from the early 1980s through to the mid-90s. The band has a ''double trio'' line-up, as made popular by Crimson between 1994-1997. LIVE IN TOKYO finds the band performing a solid 12-song set." 
    $13.00
  • "If Brian Wilson could operate a laptop...or Pink Floyd were young and skint in 2009……or Wayne Coyne was Scottish….or Grandaddy came from a land of drizzle…or Sigur Ros cracked a smile from time to time…or…we could go on.Because this is the sounds of straws being clutched as we struggle to find the perfect epithet to describe the sound of North Atlantic Oscillation. ‘Colourful’, ‘crepuscular’ and ‘expansive’ are three that spring to mind, but even they don’t quite do this Edinburgh-based three-piece’s sound justice.The debut album, Grappling Hooks, is due for release in 2010, in the meantime though comes an introductory EP ‘Callsigns’ featuring two album tracks, a remix by label-mates Engineers and an ethereal cover version of classic do-wop song, ‘I Only Have Eyes For You’, first made famous in the 1959 by The Flamingos.It sounds nothing like you expect it to. But then that’s exactly what makes North Atlantic Oscillation so beguiling, intriguing and fascinating – there’s a surprise around every corner. Are you ready?"
    $7.00
  • "The legendary Marillion guitarist and founding member Steve Rothery has long been known for his unique playing style, and in the live setting the experience cannot be matched. ‘Live In Rome’ sees the Steve Rothery band captured over 2CD’s and 1 DVD at a magical sold out show in Italy on stage at the Cross Roads Live Club earlier this year. ‘Live In Rome’ sees his intricate musicianship and atmospheric soundscapes given the space they deserve.This brilliant live set sees Rothery airing tracks from his forthcoming solo album ‘The Ghosts of Pripyat, due out on the 22nd September. Financed by an incredibly successful Kickstarter campaign which reached its fifteen thousand pound target in the first 24 hours, it went on to raise almost sixty thousand pounds and cements the already rock solid relationship that he has built with his fans worldwide. At one point it was even the second most popular music project on Kickstarter in the world. The studio album not only sees him helped by his fans, but a raft of guest musicians too, including Steve Hackett, Don Airey and many more.‘Live In Rome’ also features some brilliant performances of classic material from the Marillion cannon, with Rothery’s chosen band proving a natural fit for the music despite it being just the second time this particular group of musicians had played together live. Joining him for the evening were Dave Foster (Mr. So & So) on guitar, Yatim Halimi (Panic Room) on bass & Leon Parr on drums, as well as guests Riccardo Romano (RanestRane) on keyboards and vocalists Manuela Milanese and Alessandro Carmassi. The former bringing her sweet tones to ‘Waiting To Happen’ and ‘Sugar Mice’, and the latter packing a punch on classics such as ‘Cinderella Search’ and ‘Easter’.With the interest in Steve Rothery’s solo career at an all-time high thanks to his successful crowd-funding campaign, ‘Live In Rome’ is a fantastic look into the progression of the forth-coming ‘The Ghost of Pripyat’ album and a brilliantly crafted document of what the man him-self called “an unforgettable experience.”"
    $16.00
  • "YES - the combined age of the five guys on stage at the Hippodrome was more than 300 years - and some unkind souls would say that feels almost as long as some of their more indulgent numbers.But everybody knew why they were here. We all knew well in advance what Yes were going to play even down to the encore, and the scene was set with the entrance music of Stravinsky’s Firebird theme - just like Yes used 40 years ago. But although there were no surprises in what they played, there were plenty in how they played.Aggression isn’t probably a word that springs to mind when it comes to Yes, but there’s plenty present - along with the shifting rhythms, hardcore virtuoso musicianship, sheer power and soaring over it all the high clear harmonies and sweeping melodies that make Yes YesOriginal singer Jon Anderson is not currently with the band - but his replacement, 43-year-old American Jon Davison, is a more than adequate stand-in, sounding uncannily like Anderson at times but adding his own touches to the songs and a friendly vitality to the band onstage. The other long-standing Yesman not present is grumpy old Rick Wakeman. This time on an array of keyboards we have Geoff Downes, who has been playing with Yes on and off for 30-plus years but whom many may know best and possibly not too fondly for Buggles and Video Killed the Radio Star.The rest of the band - guitarist Steve Howe, bassist Chris Squire and drummer Alan White - are as Yes was 40 years ago - and although age may have had its impact on their hairlines or girth or ability to bop around the stage, it has totally failed to diminish their musical skills.Howe can still play lightning fast and pure, delivering faithfully favourite old solos but also bringing new embellishments and invention. And Squire showed just how important a part his melodic driving basslines have always been to the distinctive Yes sound. And when the band are playing as one they can still deliver moments that can take your breath away.It’s something of a rarity to have a rock concert at the Hippodrome - perhaps the fact the concert was being filmed meant they wanted a more theatrical setting. It seemed quite apt that there were occasional elements of pantomime - “Hello Bristol!” “Hello Steve!” - and the rather startling appearance of Chris Squire’s triple-necked bass. There was also a large screen showing films largely with New Age/old hippy themes - lots of fractals and turtles - and during Turn Of The Century what looked disturbingly like a cross between Game Of Thrones and a cereal advert. And the explosion of confetti towards the end during Perpetual Change could have seemed tacky - but it worked beautifully with the soaring optimism of the music and had the audience grinning like the children they were long ago.Highlights were too numerous to mention, but there were a few moist eyes around at the opening of And You And I; Yours Is No Disgrace sounded as good as it ever has; and the transition from the "give peace a chance” section of Your Move to the rocking abandon of All Good People might well have had a younger audience dancing in the aisles. As it was by the time the encore of Roundabout came around everybody was on their feet.It’s more than 40 years since Yes were first a huge name - able to release a triple-disc live album and have a top 10 hit with it. They and their audience may have aged a lot - but Yes still sound as good as ever when they hit those dizzyingly exuberant moments of wonder. And the audience wasn’t entirely grey-haired and wallowing in nostalgia - my 15-year-old daughter wasn’t the only youngster up and whooping at the end." - The Bristol Post
    $20.00
  • Outside of the UK, Gordon Giltrap isn't all that well known but the Brits are smart.  They recognized a national treasure.  Mr. Giltrap is one of the finest acoustic guitarists on the planet.  In the 70s and early 80s he made some extraordinary progressive rock albums that demonstrated his talents on acoustic and electric guitar.  The results were somewhat similar to Steve Hackett's solo albums.  Since then he has focused solely on acoustic guitar and became somewhat entrenched in the folk scene.Ravens & Lullabies finds Gordon Giltrap returning to the progressive rock scene.  This album is a collaboration with keyboardist Oliver Wakeman.  Fronting the band is Arena vocalist Paul Manzi (former Yes vocalist Benoit David sings lead on one track).  The rhythm section consists of Steve Amadeo and Threshold's drummer Johanne James.  Its a beautiful album demonstrating Giltrap's amazing technical ability on acoustic guitar, while Oliver Wakeman contributes the symphonic element.  Highly recommended.
    $9.00