Original Album Classics (3CD)

SKU: 886919016321
Label:
Sony Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Slipcase budget priced collection of the first three Journey albums.  This is the really awesome pre-Steve Perry jazz rock proggy stuff.

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  • One of my favorite UK prog albums of the 70s. Web was led by keyboardist Dave Lawson who later went on to play with Greenslade. Web's lineup consisted of keys, two drummers/percussionists, sax/flute, guitar and bass. At the time the band was considered "jazz rock" and there are some jazz underpinnings that are somewhat Canterbury-ish but I would just as soon classify this as progressive rock. Lawson plays a variety of keys including piano and Mellotron but its primarily his organ work is what really stands out. This new edition comes from the original master tapes, has two great live tracks from 1971 that were pilfered from the Swedish Radio archives. Dave Lawson contributed the liner notes. Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • One of the rarest and most sought after US prog albums of the 70s finally sees a legit release. Victor Peraino was the last keyboardist in Arthur Brown's Kingdom Come. When that band dissolved he used the name for his new band. While his vocals leave something to be desired his keyboard work does not. This one is a real pyrotechnic display with Mellotron, ARP, Moog, Hammond B3, and Putney VCS3 all used to good effect. As a bonus you get 4 tracks from his 1981 "Were Next" EP).
    $16.00
  • First album from these excellent Genesis influenced neoproggers.
    $15.00
  • Oddball prog release from 1971 coming out on CD for the first time. National Head Band was put together by Jan Schelhaas prior to him joining up with Caravan as a replacement to David Sinclair. The drummer for National Head Band was Lee Kerslake who went on to a long career with Uriah Heep. Its obvious that The Beatles were a strong influence on the band - you can hear it in the vocal harmonies. The band experimented with the Moog synthesizer on the album, surprisingly they didn't run wild with it particularly with Eddie Offord producing. Not a top shelf prog album but still has plenty of charm.
    $15.00
  • From beginning to end their best (and probably proggiest) album. Masterpiece.
    $15.00
  • "Esoteric Recordings are pleased to announce the release of a newly remastered anthology featuring the best of the recorded output by the legendary Danish band BURNIN RED IVANHOE, drawn from the recordings made for Sonet Records between 1969 and 1974.Burnin Red Ivanhoe are legends of the Danish Progressive Rock scene of the late 60s / early 70s. Formed in Copenhagen in 1967, the band initially featured the talents of KARSTEN VOGEL (Saxophones), STEEN CLAESSON (Guitar, Vocals), STEEN LANGE (Bass) and BO THRIGE ANDERSEN (Drums). Signing to Sonet Records in Denmark in December 1969, the band issued their first album "M 144” in 1969. Over the next few years the band’s line-up varied, but the string of albums such as "Burnin Red Ivanhoe”, "WWW”, "Miley Smile / Stage Recall” and "Right On” released between 1969 and 1974 gained many admirers throughout the world, including John Peel (who signed the band to his Dandelion label). Burnin Red Ivanhoe’s unique fusion of Jazz, Rock and the Avant Garde was as imaginative as anything emerging from the embryonic German rock scene of the time and remains impressive forty years later.This anthology has been newly remastered from the original master tapes and features an illustrated booklet with new essay."
    $19.00
  • Sometimes there are great albums that just float underneath everyone's radar.  Poor distribution, small label - or simply a band is just too far ahead of the curve for collector's to catch up.   Sooner or later they do.  That's just the nature of collecting music.  Such is the case of Sway.  Many years ago I stumbled across a copy of this obscure Italian album from 1973 and could not find any mention of it beyond one advanced collector mentioning "Oh yeah that's rare".  At the time there was little interest from the rock community in modal jazz, souljazz, space jazz, kosmigroov - whatever you want to call it.  Jazz collectors may well have been aware of the album but perhaps because the lineup consisted of relatively unknown (outside of Italy) musicians, no one really paid much attention to the album.  I did my fair share of turning friends and collectors on to the album.  Maybe it made a difference.  All I know is that finding a copy of the album now is next to impossible.So what the hell am I exactly talking about?  Sway is a quintet led by noted jazz pianist Sante Palumbo (he's still going today!).  The rest of the lineup consists of journeymen session players: Hugo Heredia (alto/tenor sax, flute), Sergio Farina (guitar), Marco Ratti (acoustic/electric bass), and Lino Liguori (drums/percussion).  If you are a fan of electric Miles Davis or Weather Report you must hear this album.Palumbo is the focal point of the band - his runs on acoustic and electric piano are breathtaking.  This guy can tear of the keys.  The music has that definite kosmigroov sound.  Electric piano plays off of wah-wah laced guitar, some nice skronking sax (and at times gorgeous, liquid flute) and a rock solid rhythmic foundation.  There are some parts to the album which have a slightly freer vibe but for the most part is quite accessible.  If you listen carefully you might hear strains of a sound that bears a kinship to Canterbury. New authorized reissue from Schema Records.  BUY OR DIE!
    $29.00
  • Remastered edition with new liner notes and photos. "Going For The One" marked Rick Wakeman's return to the band. "Awaken" is one of the all-time great Yes epics. Comes with seven (!) bonus tracks.
    $10.00
  • Legit reissue with 5 bonus tracks from this 1970 monster UK rarity.  Red Dirt were a raw blues based quartet  but their music had progressive and psychedelic overtones.  Rippin' guitarwork through out.  Recommended to fans of Incredible Hog, Human Beast, and Groundhogs."Red Dirt were a blues band formed in East Yorkshire around 1968 comprised of Dave Richardson (vocals), Steve Howden (guitar), Kenny Giles (bass) and Steve Jackson (drums) who built up an impressive live reputation in clubs and venues in the North of England. They were subsequently signed to Morgan Bluetown, When released in 1970, on the Fontana label, their self-titled debut album sunk without trace and legend - or rumour - has it sold something like 100 copies. In the last forty years Red Dirt has become a rare and expensive album with more people having heard about it than actually seen an original copy. Although valued in the 2010 edition of the Record Collector Rare Record Price Guide at E650 copies have sold for over £800 on eBay.But what was the story behind Red Dirt? Amazingly, when Record Collector announced the first vinyl reissue of the album in late 2009 the article was read by an aspiring American journalist Betsy Green who was in touch with original guitarist Steve Howden, now working as a delivery driver in Hollywood. Green interviewed Howden and four decades later we finally found out that the band came together after drummer Steve Jackson approached Howden in a pub in Bridlington in their native East Yorkshire. Howden was keen and Jackson's friends Kenny Giles and Dave Richardson were drafted in on bass guitar and lead vocals. Richardson had worked with future Hull legend Mick Ronson as well as Michael Chapman.The band attracted the interest of Morgan Bluetown who signed them. Red Dirt were put into the studio with producer Geoff Gill. "We recorded the album in Morgan studios London," recalls Howden, "McCartney finished his album in there which was a big buzz for us. They booked us in from midnight onwards, to six in the morning and the album didn't take that long, around twelve hours I think. They managed overdubs for the vocals to get them right but I don't think they ever put them on. It was all very rushed and was only ever released in England" In fact the album was licensed by Morgan to the Fontana label who released Red Dirt in 1970 and it literally vanished without trace.There has been much speculation in recent years as to whether legendary record sleeve designer Barney Bubbles was responsible for the eye-catching sleeve image of a red Indian with 4 bullet holes in his forehead dripping blood. The rear sleeve credits the design to Teenburger, Bubbles Notting Hill based company. As a number of people worked for Teenburger it is impossible to confirm if Bubbles had a hand in the, sleeve design.As for the music, Red Dirt is a lost classic. There is an element of the Doors Morrison Hotel period and a whiff of Captain Beefheart and The Magic Band in the rocking driving blues of tracks like Death Letter and Problems. Song For Pauline on the other hand harks back to the Delta of Robert Johnston comprising of only slide guitar and vocals. Memories and In The Morning were probably considered as songs fit for release as singles as both have a compelling commercial edge and benefit from more extensive arrangements which the band augmented by what sounds like a mellotron and an organ that gives their powerful music more texture and depth.That Red Dirt's natural musical chemistry was honed on the live circuit is demonstrated on the riff and harmonica prowl of Ten Seconds To Go and the driving locomotive engine of Maybe I'm Right. There is also the acid smoke-folk of Summer Madness Laced With Newbald Gold which opens with Richardson groaning and laughing against a dirty guitar riff and the song is then propelled forward by drum pattern straight out of Safe As Milk. "It seems as if the red dirt is blowing into my eyes," sings Richardson on this outstanding track which sadly reflected the critical and commercial indifference that greeted the release of the album. It appears that the band later returned to the studio to record additional material earmarked for a second album that was, according to one press report when the band were supporting Mott The Hoople on a tour in January 1971 "nearing completion and should be available shortly".Sadly, the young Red Dirt dudes never did issue that second LP but this CD features five bonus tracks featuring Ron Hales on guitar who had replaced Steve Howden. So, as well as enjoying their debut you can also get down in the dirt and wrap your ears around From End To End, Yesterday And Today, The Circle Song, I'd Rather Go Back 15 Years and Tolly Cobbold. Thanks to Secret Records you don't have to pay an arm and a leg to do so!by Ian Shirley, Record Collector magazine" - Rockasteria
    $6.00
  • Hot kosmigroov set from 1975 and my understanding is that its quite a rarity on vinyl.  Its a bit of an unusual lineup for this session: Roland Haynes (keyboard), Kirk Lightsey (keyboard), Henry Franklin (bass), and Carl Burnett (drums).  So you get dual keys - each one playing off another.  You like Fender Rhodes?  Its all over this album.  Lightsey uses a wah-wah pedal with his electric piano to get a distorted - almost guitar like sound.  Fingers are flying everywhere and the rhythm section is locked in and pounding.  This could almost (emphasis on almost) pass for a Alan Gowen - Dave Stewart jam session.  Reminds me a bit of National Health in spots.  
    $17.00
  • Reinterpretations of classical compositions has always been a hallmark of German technical thrash band Mekong Delta.  In 1993 they released a compilation album featuring nothing but their versions of the classics.  In 2011 they remastered the album and updated it including material they recorded subsequently. 
    $18.00
  • Budget priced 5CD set in a slimline case including the following albums:Wasa WasaSing Brother SingEdgar Broughton BandIn Side OutOora
    $23.00
  • From the defunct Radioactive Records bootleg label. "Originally released in 1974 (P.G. 101), The Unicorn is considered to be one of the prime examples of what is now known as 'Outsider Music'. Its creator, New Yorker Peter Grudzien, grew up in the '50s listening to Hank Williams, Johnny Cash and other country music artists. By the '60s he was writing and recording his own country styled tunes and had added rising star Bob Dylan to his list of performers to aspire to. Comprising a selection of lo-fi home recordings made over several years (the earliest being from 1960), The Unicorn has songs of religious visions and redemption, life's struggles, and tales of romance gone wrong (brief references are made to Grudzien's own gay affairs, he 'came out' in song in the '60s). Predominantly rooted in country and bluegrass picking, the music also features electronic experiments, and borrows a few 'classic' tunes here and there in an early attempt at sampling. Intense, claustrophobic, eccentric, challenging, overwhelming, but about all, honest. These are all words that have been used to describe this album. You can add 'unique' too... for all those who prefer their country music with a twist."
    $9.00
  • Christian Vander has been opening up the tape vaults releasing some prime (and some not so prime) Magma material. Mekanik Kommandoh is the previously unreleased original version of Mekanik Destruktiw Kommandoh which was rejected by their record label.
    $18.00