Octave Of The Holy Innocents

New digipak reissue of this recording uniting three eclectic and visionary musicians - Jonas Hellborg, Buckethead, and Michael Shrieve. Buckethead is playing acoustic guitar while Hellborg plays acoustic bass and keyboards. Shrieve plays a variety of percussion and kit. Surprisingly it's pretty agressive for what is essentially an acoustic trio.

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  • Originally released in 1990, this is Realm's second album. Gold disc reissue feature 24 bit remastering, a bonus track - a cover of King Crimson's "One More Red Nightmare", as well as liner notes from Takis Kinis. This digipak reissue is a hand numbered edition of 2000 copies.
    $15.00
  • Long sought after fusion album from drummer/keyboardist Patrick Forgas is now finally available on CD. Originally released in 1977 on the Gratte Ciel label, Cocktail will score with any fan of Pierre Moerlen's Gong, Jean-Luc Ponty and Soft Machine. The music is a continuous whirlwind of percussion, violin, keyboards, sax, flute and wordless vocals. Zao bassist Gerard Provost lends a Magma-like heaviness to the bottom end of the sound spectrum. The 18 minute "My Trip" lives up to its name - a long musical journey that will keep you off balance through out. Packed with lots of bonus material, Cocktail is a killer package.
    $13.00
  • Second album from this Norwegian band finds them climbing the ladder of melancholy prog bands. Short on complexity but long on atmosphere and melody, Airbag's new one packs an emotional wallop. The album has just enough spacey keyboards to draw comparisons to Pink Floyd and older Porcupine Tree. The album builds up to the 17 minute "Homesick I - III" which has enough references to Wish You Were Here that you'll be plowing through your Floyd collection afterwards. Lethal atmospheric prog that will annihilate the minds of any Anathema or Riverside fan. Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • A new release from Causa Sui is like money in the bank.  The new Live At Freak Valley is no exception.  The live milieu is where the band really shines.  If you are unfamilar with the band you should know that the band's origins date back to the stoner scene but they evolved into something different - something more psychedelic - more organic.  The quartet features Jakob Skott (drums), Jonas Munk (guitar), Jess Kahr (bass), and Rasmus Rasmussen (keyboards).  The band goes off on looooong instrumental jams.  Munk's guitarwork has a beautiful fluidity that plays off of Rasmussen's keyboards which tend to surge to the forefront like waves on the ocean - or sit back and become a nice supporting backdrop for Munk's lead work.  I love when Munk burst out with a chunk of heavy riffage that recalls their stoner days.  Reminds me of vintage Zeppelin!  Highly recommended.
    $35.00
  • MY BROTHER THE WIND is an improvisational cosmic rock collective consisting of members of widely known Swedish acts Makajodama, Magnolia, Animal Daydream and most notably Anekdoten, one of the more widely recognized names in the 1990s prog rock revival.Recorded live in the studio with no overdubs during a single day in January 2013, Once There Was A Time When Time And Space Were One captures the collective's progressive soundscape qualities with incredible analogue studio production. The band utilized 6 and 12 string acoustic and electric guitars, Mellotron, flute, bass, drums, congas and more to complete the task. Expect 45 minutes of the band's most succinct material to date, recorded deep in the snowy, forested, Swedish wilderness.In 2013, MBTW expanded into an even wider fanbase, having been invited to play the mighty Roadburn Festival in Tilburg, Holland, as well as at Duna Jam in Sardinia.  At the invitation of Opeth’s Mikael Okerfeldt, guitarist Nicklas Barker returned to Roadburn to perform an improv set with Dungen guitarist Reine Fiske.Those who frequent the works of Popol Vuh, Amon Duul, Sun Ra, Träd, Gräs Och Stenar, Albert Ayler, Ash Ra Tempel, Gong, Pink Floyd and other visionary, psychedelic rock artists are advised to investigate this act. "Lush and instrumental for its duration, My Brother the Wind‘s third full-length, Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One (released by Free Electric Sound/Laser’s Edge), rolls out of the speakers much easier than its title rolls off the tongue, though both title and the work itself satisfy rhythmically. The Swedish four-piece — they now seem to be a bass-less trio with Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten) and Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama) on electric/acoustic 12-strong guitar and Daniel Fridlund Brandt on drums, but Ronny Eriksson plays bass on the album — reportedly recorded live to two-inch tape on a vintage machine, and the passion they put in bleeds readily into the nine-song/45-minute outing, fleshed with liberal splashes of Mellotron courtesy of Barker to play up a ’70s prog feel in a piece like the 12-minute “Garden of Delights.” That’s hardly the only point at which those sensibilities emerge, but even more than that, the primary vibe here is one of gorgeous heavy psych exploration, the band adventuring and feeling their way through the material as they go.On peaceful moments like the title-track, which arrives as the penultimate movement before “Epilogue” leads the way back to reality — accordingly, “Prologue” brings us in at the start — that exploration is positively serene, the 12-string complemented by spacious electric tones spreading out across vast reaches, but Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One offers more than drone and psychedelic experiments. Subtly pushed forward by Brandt‘s drums, pieces like “Into the Cosmic Halo” and even “Epilogue” enact classic space rock thrust, and even “Song of Innocence Part 1,” the first part of the journey after the backward atmospherics of “Prologue” introduce, has some cosmic feel amid its echoing solos. Its subsequent complement, “Song of Innocence Part 2,” swells to life on an even more active roll, waves of amp noise up front while drums and bass groove out behind, waiting for the guitars to catch up, which they do in a suitably glorious payoff, relatively brief but masterfully engaging, setting a momentum that continues well into “Garden of Delights,” a focal point for more than its length.Because the songs flow so well one to the next, some directly bleeding, others giving a brief pause, and because later cuts like “Thomas Mera Gartz” — named in honor of the drummer for ’70s Swedish proggers Träd, Gräs och Stenar — and the title-track have a quieter take, it’s tempting to read some narrative into the shifts of Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One, but with the material not being premeditated, I’m not sure that’s the intention so much as a signal it’s well arranged. In any case, the album offers an immersive, resonant listen, with tonal richness to spare and the presence of mind to keep a sense of motion even in its stillest parts and a balance of organic elements — Danielsson‘s recorder and Brandt‘s percussion on “Misty Mountainside,” the 12-string, etc. — amid a wash of effects and swirling psychedelia. This attention to sonic detail makes Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One more than just a collection of jams, and adds further purpose to the already worthy cause of My Brother the Wind‘s thoughtful musings, wandering and not at all lost." - The Obelisk
    $13.00
  • Limited mini-LP sleeve edition."Paul Chain is, apparently, a weirdo who came from the band Death SS, who I know nothing about and thus won’t bother trying to summarize. No, I think I have enough material here just talking about Paul Chain’s oddball solo debut Life and Death. It is an esoteric and individual beast without anything resembling trendiness or modernization, reaching back from its late 80s standing into the dark murkiness of the 70s at some parts, and at others into an entirely new dimension, unexplored by man before and since. People, I can’t come up with any more ways to say this is strange, so let’s just cut the middle man and start reviewing this sucker.Life and Death isn’t exactly a title that sends any warning signals to your brain, and neither the track names or the cover art does either, so I really had nothing to go on. I guess I was expecting some sort of dirty, minimalistic doomy affair with deep, grunted vocals and dirgey bass and occult themes, or something, but really I was completely unprepared for the airy strings, the clean, sluggish guitars that sometimes broke into melodious leads and the high-pitched warbling from the vocals that followed.Yes, Paul Chain as a vocalist is quite literally out of this world, as I can’t think of even one other singer I know to compare him to. His voice alone sounds a tiny bit like Jon Arch if he ever got a super-clean production job, but it’s the way he sings that is so different from anyone else. For one, a lot of the time he apparently isn’t even singing real words – he’s completely made up his own language. How fucked up is that? It’s actually really cool and lends to the alien mystical air this album was obviously trying to set up. And two, his vocal lines are just so idiosyncratic and so stylized that I doubt anyone could cover and not sound totally ridiculous even attempting. His voice dives and soars and croons and emotes a million different ways over the course of this album, and not once does he sound like he’s straining. His high, slightly breathy whine is layered over the music like a light morning mist.The music isn’t quite as weird, but it’s still pretty damned distinctive. The first track is a pretty useless intro without much to really make it worth hearing, but then “Antichrist” kicks in, with its crawling tempo and strange nuanced vocal lines, and this is a song that had to grow on me a little – it’s not one of the best on here, but it’s certainly good enough to introduce the listener to what’s going to come. This is music that succeeds when you just sit back and let it roll over you in waves – like on “Kill Me,” which rides a really simple, driving riff for the entire seven minute run-time, along with Chain’s moaning of the titular words for the chorus. But it works; it really works. It engulfs the listener in a chasm of melody so tight they might never be able to get out, and it’s probably the album standout at the end of the day. “Ancient Caravans” is a short, soft piece with some really delicate vocals and an atmosphere like the Middle East at nighttime, and then we kick into the other album highlight with “My Hills,” which explodes like a shooting star with happy island-style acoustics layered over colorful, blazing leads in what ends up being a mouthwatering affair. It’s not terribly metallic but it is a wonderful, engaging piece of music.The rest of the album remains curious, with the sliding guitar melodies of “Alleuia Song” and the muttered vocals and more traditional metal riff of “Spirits,” even though there are no songs as good as “My Hills.” “Cemetery” is 8 minutes of thumping bass-lines, grunted vocals and loopy, obscure guitar leads, and it comes together pretty well, never failing to entertain even if it isn’t really something that will blow you away. The album closes with “Oblivious,” which is an organ piece that leaves the listener feeling uncertain, staring at the night sky wondering what he or she has just experienced…I like it myself; it’s a good way to leave an impression. It’s like, what happened? I’d better listen to that again and inspect it more closely. And that’s always good.Life and Death is pretty much like that as a whole, really – it’s a curious affair, and no doubt inspired. With only seven tracks being actual songs it runs under 40 minutes of real music, and I think that hurts it a bit, as it really does fly by. And I don’t want to be mean to this album or anything, but a lot of these songs just don’t really catch fire. “Kill Me” and “My Hills” are about the only ones that do. Nothing else really comes up to that level, and it’s a little disappointing, as I know he has it in him to do a whole album like that. These songs are good, but most of them end up being just…curious, rather than spellbinding and arresting as those two mentioned songs can be. This feels like a warm-up album at the end of the day. Nothing wrong with that, and I can really dig this when it’s on, but I think the stars are telling me with this to go seek out Chain’s future exploits and find gold…" - Metal Archives 
    $17.00
  • "Uncle Acid And The Deadbeats are one of those rock stories. The ones where a demo gets a cult following spurred on by mysterious stories surrounding the artist. It’s nothing new; Jandek had it before he stepped into the light, as did Brujeria before their secret was discovered. Uncle Acid was spoken of in hushed tones as everything from the work of a savant, to a batch of tapes dug up in an old barn. Soon enough it became known that Uncle Acid was one man, who then got a band and began playing to sold out houses. Ah, rock and roll.Next up for this enigma wrapped in a Blue Cheer album is the new full length Mind Control, an album about drug-fueled sacrifices and other such unhinged material. Those familiar with Uncle Acid will easily slide into Mind Control. The album opens with “Mt. Abraxas”, a slow churning doom number that harkens back to the tune “Death’s Door” from 2012’s Bloodlust. Difference is, “Death’s Door” was a seven-minute opus that came second; “Mt. Abraxas” is the first song, which might have been an error in judgment. Seven minutes of slow doom is not the best way to kick off a record even if there is a Sabbath inspired toe-tapping jam out in the middle.Bloodlust worked because it spliced together pop song structures with 60s psychedelic fuzzed-out rock. In other words, it was undeniable catchy while still strife with head bangingness (a word of my own creation). Uncle Acid retains that combination on Mind Control. “Mind Crawler” is all about the fat ass guitar groove and druggie vocals. Remember those sixties drug films that opened with hot girls dancing in a dark basement caught by dimly lit and over saturated film stock, “Mind Crawler” is right in line with a song playing during those montages.“Poison Apple”, the first single from Mind Control, is a list of scary ideas sung over a riff that could easily have come from Tony Iommi circa 1974. That interplay between the notes, the swing to the groove, the Iommi sound. It’s all in “Poison Apple”, which fits perfectly with lyrics like “Don’t you worry baby, you’re safe with me/I’m the poison apple in the tree” or “I’m the water dripping from your drain/I’m the spider crawling through your brain”. If Iommi had heard this riff the Sabbath classic “The Wizard” might have been very different.Uncle Acid ramps up the High Rocktane with “Evil Love”, though I must take issue with the song. As rocking as it is, “Evil Love” is so close to “Children Of The Grave” I would understand if Sabbath checked themselves into a rape crisis center.  Still, originality is not what Uncle Acid is about. They are here to bring the better-living-through-chemistry/serial killer point of view back to rock. Case in point, “Death Valley Blues”, which could easily be the ramblings of Charles Manson put to music. What makes the tune so awkward and bizarre is that it owes more to the Beatles than it does Cathedral. Using that innocent “Yellow Submarine” singsong vibe and then coating it with dark, bluesy psych-rock is a stroke of genius.The Beatles-via-Sabbath continues with “Follow The Leader” only the pop-blues rock bastard son is anointed with the oils of Ravi Shankar or John McLaughlin during his India music phase. “Follow The Leader” is all power chords and sitar. It absolutely screams for you to get baked during it. Mind War ends strong with “Devil’s Work”, a military marching song filtered through Doctor Strange’s Eye Of Agamotto. This is where you come down from the high and realize your worldview is altered and now you’re scared.You can’t really understand how good Mind Control is until you’ve listened to it several times. On first pass you might say “Yeah, thanks, but I have all the Blue Cheer and Black Sabbath albums I need”. Fair enough, but you’re missing the point. Uncle Acid unabashedly embraces and exploits their influences but still manage to concoct an elixir that is interesting even though it’s so familiar. That dichotomy is why people loved them in the first place and why they clamor to see them live. I’ll bet these tunes absolutely crush live.This album isn’t perfect, there are lots of little things to get persnickety about. Vocals that often come dangerously close to Weird Al Yankovic, opening Mind Control with a seven minute doom jam that isn’t particularly interesting, the over saturated production does get irritating at times. These are all petty squabbles. Mind Control is a kick ass slice of druggy rock goodness. Would you question the eighteen-foot tall stuffed platypus with ginger-ale eyes and chocolate hands that comes to you, two tabs in, offering the secret to eternal life?Of course not. So why question dear old Uncle Acid?" - Crave Online
    $10.00
  • This is the release that kicked it off for the Finnish band.  A thirty-five minute release that seamlessly marries Scandinavian folk music with Ozric Tentacles influence space rock."This amazing space rock band from Finland has captured the attention of fans of the genre around the world, and even those who usually aren't that interested in it. Who would have thought the next band in the line of Gong and Ozric Tentacles would come from Finland? Well, why not?Purely instrumental excursions into psychedelic spaces, propelled by Tim Blake-like droning and burbling synths, Hillage-like guitar glisandos and arpeggios, pulsating bass lines, phasing sitars, and precise drumming with some occasional Ian Anderson-ish (vocalizing and blowing simultaneously) flute work to spice things up. They're like Gong without jazzy influences or vocals, and like the Ozrics without techno influences. Just pure, hypnotic, unadulterated space rock to float past the rings of Saturn with ... my favorite kind of prog." - New Gibraltar Encyclopedia Of Progressive Rock
    $13.00
  • Stunning reissue of the first Et Cetera album, originally released on the Global Music label. Et Cetera sported quite a lineup - Wolfgang Dauner (keyboards), Sigi Schwab (guitar, sitar, flute, etc), Eberhard Weber (bass, cello), Fred Braceful (percussion), and Roland Wittich (percussion). The music could almost be described as psychedelic jazz. Many of these members had backgrounds in free jazz/experimental music. This is a cohesive effort but their past as improv players shines through from time to time. Dauner and Schwab love to use a ring modulator and everyone seems to figure out a way to invent some freaked out noises. In fact Dauner's use of the ring modulator reminds a bit of Dave Stewart in National Health. Schwab's use of various stringed instruments brings a different dimension to jazz rock that you never hear. When was the last time you heard a fusion album with sitar, lute, tamubra, and kalimba? While this first effort doesn't hit the heights that they would attain on later albums like Rischka's Soul and Knirsch, its a pretty interesting foreshadowing of things to come. Essential!"This special limited edition contains the original Et Cetera's eponymous "silver cover" album (1980 reissue on Brain titled "Lady Blue"), originally released in 1971 on Global Records and another complete LP of recordings from the same recording session. This is an extraordinary album of weirdly trippy fusion that rides somewhere between instrumental Amon Duul II, Embryo and Dauners own earlier classic "Output". Full of ethnic (Arabic and Indian) spice with lots of the ethnic colour added by legendary guitar and sitar (et. al.) player Sigi Schwab (Embryo), oddly keyboard sounds by Wolfgang Dauner, dreamy bass patterns by Eberhard Weber and driving percussions by Fred Braceful and Roland Wittich, this is spacy, crazy, Krautrock and - a bit jazzy. Alan and Steven Freeman (The Crack In The Cosmic Egg) present this album in their "The Krautrock Top 100". Maybe the album was originally planned as a double-album because there are 4 more titles from the same recording session, which really knock you out. "Kabul" (08:56) (title-name is program) is a killer, especially because of Schwabs exploding electric guitar and Webers driving bass. "Tau Ceti" (07:15) is a wonderful dreamy delight presenting Schwabs gorgeous acoustic guitar playing. Further bonus track "Behind The Stage" (06:35) connects Schwabs special electric guitar with a band atmospheric but rhythmic fundamental play. "An Open Cans" (not an the CD-Version, for the first time ever released) is a 12:35 minute piece full of experimentation and reminds sometimes to album track "Lady Blue". This album will be a masterpiece for all time. Its unique. Remastered from the original master tapes. The sound is brilliant. Double Album comes with informative four-sided insert and a reproduction of the original album (silver cover) sleeve art. Limited edition of 1000."
    $49.00
  • "The Prog Rock supergroup whose debut became the surprise hit of 2012 returns with a brand new album featuring an even more impressive lineup of stellar musicians and artists lending their talents to this incredible project!Features performances by mindblowing musicians Steve Stevens, Rick Wakeman, Steve Morse, Peter Banks (in his final appearance) as well as Captain Kirk himself William Shatner, PLUS members of Yes, Dream Theater, Nektar Asia, Gong and more!Deluxe digipak packaging!Performed by:Rick Wakeman Steve Stevens Chris Squire Peter Banks Steve Morse Larry Fast Alan Parsons Sonja Kristina Jordan Rudess Steve Hillage John Wesley Nik Turner Geoff Downes Roye Albrighton Gary Green Tony Kaye William Shatner Colin Moulding Mel Collins John Wetton Derek Sherinian Billy Sherwood Fee Waybill Patrick Moraz Jim Cuomo "
    $15.00
  • Second album from the Swedish quartet of Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten), Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama), Ronny Eriksson, and Tomas Eriksson. Like their first album, I Wash My Soul In The Stream Of Infinity is pure psychedelic bliss. The songs have their roots in jam sessions. Overall there is a very German underground/krautrock feel. These long jams vary in tempo - from the buzz saw opener "Fire! Fire!" on through the blissed out Yatha Sidhra-like acoustic "Pagan Moonbeam". Lethal guitar leads augmented by dollops of Mellotron and organ are the order of the day. All served up with phat analogue sound. If its possible to get high from a round aluminum disc this is the one that will do it for you. Highly recommended to those you seek to explore the innermost nooks and crannies of their brain.
    $15.00
  • This psychedelic trio has been kicking around for over a decade.  At their jammiest best I'm remind very much of a Steve Hillage freak out - lots of watery glissando guitar leads.  The rest of it has a definite 70s West Coast vibe.  Very trippy stuff. "Guy Blakeslee is a man of many faces and talents. Every time I see him perform he seems to have been cascaded by a new identity and the music is telling of that change in identity. While Blakeslee has a history of recording under a bluesy solo moniker of Entrance, then transitioning from that to a full band with the epic heavy death rattle Blues masterpiece Prayer of Death. Only after that did he change the name of the group to The Entrance Band. And with that, they released an eponymous debut album to celebrate the collective’s cohesion. With this release, there came a different dynamic in sound. It was as much set in Blues and Psychedelic Rock as it was an almost likely return to arena Rock of days old.For this reason as well as The Entrance Band’s live performances that are quite simply matched by none living today, I have kept them on my radar for several years. They delight every human sense. Needless to say, I was enthralled when I discovered Face The Sun, their sophomore album. The Entrance Band relish in psychedelia here, swirling guitars, sumptuous wah-wahs, lyrical witchcraft. “Fine Flow” is a fantastic album opener, setting the stage with a bassline that will stick like a wad of gum to the back of your mind. “The Crave” is an especially appealing track, Blakeslee’s vocals are wanton and pained with delicious Blues harp interjections and the gentle addition of harpsichord in the track’s culmination. “No Needs” is The Entrance Band’s radio worthy track of the album, for it really shines with powerful vocal delivery, outstanding and diverse instrumentation (even featuring a flute driven climax). The real spectacle of this album is the diversity in styles they embrace. Borrowing instrumental techniques from various country-oriented genres such as Spain’s fingerpicking Flamenco and various earthy percussions. With each listen, a new layer of this album unravels and reveals itself to you. Pick it up and treat your mind to its elaborate caress, or for that matter, go for the gusto and pick up The Entrance Band’s three EP’s Dans La Tempete, Fine Flow EP, and Latitudes, all recently released and give them all a listen in succession. That will really take you on a spiritual ride!There is no telling where The Entrance Band will take us next. If I may be so bold, they may very well prove to be the Psychedelic equivalent of this generation’s The Doors, even if only by name. Offering us entrances to alternate realities one album at a time." - Its Psychedelic Baby
    $17.00
  • Third album from this intense Danish trio is only available on vinyl.  Papir create heavy psychedelic jams that evoke the feel of early German bands like Ash Ra Tempel and Guru Guru.  The album was produced by Causa Sui mainman Jonas Munk who totally catches the vibe.  Crazed wah-wah laced solos that will blast you into the cosmos!  I'm getting high just writing about it!!!  This one kills and it kills and it doesn't stop killing from beginning to end."Papir is an instrumental trio from Copenhagen, Denmark. They’ve created their own unique type of semi-improvised psychedelic rock by mixing together new and old, heavyness and atmosphere, freedom and power. By now they have become masters of their craft, and this, their third album, earns them a spot in the absolute elite of the current European psychedelic rock scene. Everyone who has been lucky enough to catch the band live know what an reverence-inducing experience their energitic, adventurous explorations can be. Papir are the perfect antidote to the fashionable trends that continues to dominate the present, but they don’t go beyond the limited to scope of the dominating indie-rock by merely reaching back to the bygone golden era of pyschedelic rock and electric jazz like so many others do – they transcend it. Their music sounds vital and fresh.When Mojo writer Kieron Tyler visited Denmark’s renowned SPOT Festival in the summer of 2012 he was blown away by Papir’s performance as an experience that clearly stood out compared to the rest of the bill (that included all of Scnadinavias leading acts): It takes a lot to stand out at SPOT…but Copenhagen’s Papir are arresting. Their guitar, bass and drums mesh powerfully in an intense, jazz-inflected instrumental rock. Voyaging through post-rock Tortoise terrain, it nods towards Hawkwind’s freak outs and employs liberal dollops of wah-wah pedal. The pieces – not songs – twist and turn like Dark Star Grateful Dead. From these jumping off points, Papir scurry off on their own path." 
    $23.00
  • Gorgeous remastered edition featuring a killer bonus track - a 19 minute live version of "Homage To The God Of Light", recorded at the Marquee Club in 1974.
    $12.00