The Nexus (Special Edition)

SKU: SPINE727444
Label:
Spinefarm Records
Category:
Power Metal
Add to wishlist 

This is the limited special edition that is not being released in North America.  It features two bonus tracks and is housed in a gatefold CD wallet.

AMARANTHE, the fast-rising modern metal sextet, will release their sophomore album, 'The Nexus', on March 26th via Spinefarm Records.

Produced by Jacob Hansen (whose credits include Volbeat, Dreamshade & Ginger Wildheart, and who worked on Amaranthe's 2011 self-titled debut), 'The Nexus' sees the Swedish/Danish outfit further honing a musical style that blends cutting-edge melodic metal with soaring pop melodies, the whole thing topped off by a unique three-vocal attack.

Says guitarist and band co-founder Olof Morck: "The moment has come to let loose 'The Nexus' on an unsuspecting world! This time we went all the way with our futuristic dream-nightmare - a no-compromise vision steeped in deep contrast between the mechanically ultra-heavy and shimmering serene melody. 'The Nexus' is everything we dreamed about doing with our debut album; we laboured to make this offering as diverse as it is direct and catchy. and remember, no-one can be told what 'The Nexus' is - you have to hear it for yourself!"

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • "Suddenly, Polish progressive-rock bands are infiltrating the international scene. While many of them are reaching new audiences thanks to the rise of the homeland's Metal Mind Productions, ProgRock Records in the United States managed to nab one of the best. Sandstone initially was formed in 2001 without a keyboard player. But as the band's sound evolved into a hybrid of neo-progressive and progressive-metal music – think, maybe, Arena meets Dream Theater – the quartet quickly realized it needed keys to add texture and depth to its songs.Sandstone's debut, Looking For Myself, is an expansive, six-song journey chronicling one man's struggle for nothing more than to love and to be loved. It sounds more upbeat than Riverside (arguably one of the biggest acts to come out of Poland in recent years) and less technical than Dream Theater. But the sheer ambition of these songs – only one of which clocks in at shorter than seven and a half minutes – propels Looking For Myself into the ranks of those debut discs that leave listeners not only wanting more but also wondering where else the band could take the music. The best indication of Sandstone's capabilities can be heard on "Birth of My Soul," which opens with clear and concise soloing from guitarist Jarek Niecikowski and eventually reaches David Gilmour aspirations near the song's conclusion. Vocalist Marcin Zmorzynski's thick accent is a minor distraction early on, but getting used to it is easy.As is listening to this album." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $3.00
  • This is the album that really broke the band in North America.  Hit after hit..."After years of writing hook-laden choruses and triumphantly buzzing riffs, this German band finally perfected the formula. A fine mix of poise and passion, Love at First Sting appeals to both angry metalheads and Top-40 aficionados." -- Jon Wiederhorn
    $5.00
  • Dutch "sympho" prog has a very specific sound. Listen to Knight Area, Kayak, et al. There is a strong emphasis on melody with an overall lightness influenced by bands like Camel and Yes - particularly Camel. Leap Day fits the mold completely. Some beautiful soloing with a real airiness to their sound.
    $14.00
  • In our changeover in distributors we received back a quantity of copies of Specs. We need to bring our inventory level back to normal so we are going to temporarily blow out this title. Grab copies at below wholesale price while you can.
    $13.00
  • Justin Greaves continues to churn the lineup but the core sound of Crippled Black Phoenix remains the same.  Vocals are now helmed by Daniel Änghede and he's quite good.  Not sure why no one can hold down the fort at the microphone for more than one album but Greaves keeps finding quality voices.The sound of CBP is a modern twist on vintage Pink Floyd.  A mash up of post rock and old school prog rock.  No Mellotrons here but lots of splashes of organ at just the right time that will remind you of Richard Wright.  Contemporary but old all at the same time.  That's the enigma of Cripple Black Phoenix and what keeps me coming back for more, album after album.  Highly recommended.(Oh - apologies about the price.  The band is signed to Mascot Records, who for reasons unknown to either the band or their management, do not give CBP's albums a US release.  This is an expensive imported digipak)
    $21.00
  • CD/DVD digipak edition.  The DVD contains two video clips plus a "making of" documentary."Do you like melody? Do you like duets? And do you like POOOWEEER?!? Then this album has you covered. This project between Michael Kiske and Amanda Somerville has produced a beast that’s every bit as forceful and epic as it is catchy, and even moving at times, with the stunning vocal talent from both singers really delivering on the emotional front. The duets between the two are really the highlight of the release, with some songs mainly including harmonies and others being more of an interaction between the two.The titular “City of Heroes” is one of the definite highlights, opening the album in an uplifting, upbeat explosion of sound. “Rising Up” may be even better, with its very fast rhythm and catchy chorus putting it somewhere among the best songs of the album. The style of music can be described as somewhere between DRAGONFORCE and WITHIN TEMPTATION’s more recent work, with the drums being a massive driving force and propelling the synth and guitars up into the stratosphere.The synth is an essential part of the mix, providing the introduction for the majority of the songs, as well as being the backbone of the record, possibly more so than the drums. Magnus Karlsson has done a great job in both of his roles, giving every track a melody that is enhanced massively by the vocals. It would be easy to imagine that the bass has been smothered by the plethora of other sounds that it supports, but that is fortunately not the case, as it is still present and correct alongside the drums.One strange thing that happened to me while listening to the album was that I felt an overwhelming urge to sing along to each track, and found myself doing so during the occasional chorus, despite being clueless as to what the lyrics were. That’s not the result of a language barrier either; for a mostly German project, it’s surprising that all the lyrics sound so clear in English.The softer songs are worth mentioning, as well as the powerful ones, as they give the vocalists a chance to show off. “Ocean of Tears” is a good example, using strings to provide a minimalistic backing sound to Kiske and Somerville, who belt out a heartfelt duet that is perhaps the best emotional display of the record.There is virtually nothing negative to say about this album; it’s long enough without being too long, it’s varied, the production is top notch, and the musical quality is fantastic. If you haven’t heard it, you’re missing out. Go and listen to it.…Well go on then!" - Metal Temple 
    $19.00
  • This superb Swedish band follow up their white hot performance at Nearfest with the release of their fifth album and its their best. The band really has developed their own identity. There is an underpinning of humor but at the same time the lyrics don't deal with unicorns and magical forests - in fact there is plenty of heavy duty swear words through out so if that is offensive to you stay clear. Its a musical monster with devastating organ work - check out the closer "The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of" (my dreams ARE made of this stuff!). In general the musical talent is mega-high and full on display here. Oh yeah - for about 10 seconds the Cookie Monster rears his head so watch out!!One of the finest (if not THE finest) example of contemporary progressive rock. Beardfish give a wink and a nod to the old timers but clearly have carved out a path of their own that ANY fan (with a strong heart) should endorse. This will make everyone's top 10 list at year end. BUY OR DIE!!
    $11.00
  • 2LP vinyl edition arrives comes with a CD of the album as well. FOREIGN CUSTOMERS PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU WILL BE SUBJECT TO ADDITIONAL SHIPPING CHARGES DUE TO THE HEAVIER WEIGHT OF THE VINYL EDITION."‘Map of the Past‘, the fifth studio album from Cumbrian prog rockers It Bites, will most likely inhabit a strange, disturbing place in your heart. It’s a release that is obscurely beautiful and tender, but also one that can occasionally sound incongruous and lost in time. Very often, when it comes to progressive music, people will often justify anything odd by defending it with its genre. In the case of It Bites, there is a temptation to lean on a sound from their 80s heyday, which occasionally makes ‘Map of the Past’ seem staid and not just a little cheesy.In places this album is a wonderful, soaring retrospect vision of a forgotten generation, built around the ‘discovery of an old family photograph’. Although not a concept album per se, ‘Map of the Past’ explores the idea of lives captured within photographs, and reflects these contemplative visions with equally thoughtful music; album opener, ‘Man In the Photograph’ opens with the fuzz of radio static and soon leads into sound of organs and John Mitchell’s recollections borne from this one picture. The song blends into the more progressive sounding fare of ‘Wallflower‘ and its indulgent synth solo. The title track is more engaging, with soaring chorus vocals and disorientating time signatures, showcasing the tight musicianship and richly mature songwriting ability that has grown from their 30 years of existence.The strength of this album falters with ‘Flag’ and its irrepressibly outdated smattering of 80s memorabilia and Sting powered vocal lines, although the lyrics are undoubtedly more engaging than any Police offshoot. The album does have a tendency to wander into these unpalatable territories, but more than often than not redeems itself; as the grandiose, irresistible flounce of ‘Send No Flowers‘ resurrects its orchestral bombast and moves into ‘Meadow and the Stream’s artistically detailed backdrop, it’s clear that this album is more rollercoaster than record. The album finishes, as it started, relying on simply constructed songs and that radio static to bookmark the end; ‘The Last Escape’ is honestly beautiful, and seems even more so in contrast to the tumult of the remainder of the record.‘Map of the Past’ shifts between temporal paradigms rather than changing between tracks; it’s a scintillating album that is honest to itself, and stays true to It Bites’ form, even if it does rely on sounds from their back backcatalogue occasionally. Despite this, the depth of the album is phenomenal and is genuinely rich in its storyline, with music that peaks and troughs fittingly. Well worth a listen if you find yourself pointed at the progosphere." - Bring The Noise
    $20.00
  • Their first album was laid back psychedelic folk with a female singer. Quite beautiful.
    $16.00
  • Lobby Loyde is a name that I've seen for many a year in rare record catalogs but I never heard his music until now. An Australian guitarist of some reknown in his home country he apparently slogged on for years with a variety of bands. Beyond Morgia is a fascinating musical document that has sat on the shelf, unreleased, since it was recorded in 1976. Essentially Loyde came up with a concept for an instrumental space rock album that would be the soundtrack for a sci-fi novel he had written. It was recorded with a full band but never released. While it opens with a few disposable tracks of spacy synth noodling it eventually makes it way to 3 epic length tracks that are ripped right from the Pink Floyd play book circa Wish You Were Here and Animals. If I didn't tell you what you were listening to you would think it was Floyd - it's insane how much this sounds like them! By the way, this guy is a monster guitarist. He flys up and down the frets. Lobby gets low marks for originality but high marks for execution. The fact that something like this sat in the vaults for so long is amazing. Oh by the way, the disc comes in a gorgeous diecut digipak - the booklet has extensive notes and an interview with Lobby Loyde. I like it and recommend it because I love Pink Floyd and I can make believe that it's the missing album between WYWH and Animals. For the hell of it - here is the record label hype: Beyond Morgia: The Labyrinths Of Klimster is the legendary, previously unreleased 1976 space rock album and the soundtrack to an imaginary film. In June 1976, Lobby Loyde was at a critical juncture in his career; he stood at the metaphorical musical crossroads where a number of pathways lay ahead of him yet nothing was certain. He had already established himself as one of Australia's legendary guitarists and rock personalities, having toured and recorded relentlessly with The Purple Hearts, The Wild Cherries, The Aztecs, Coloured Balls and Southern Electric. Yet where was he to go from here? With his faith in Australian music at low-ebb, he'd already decided to travel to London to check out the scene over there. One final order of business he had to complete before his departure in early July was to record a new album. Lobby had written the music for a space rock concept album which he wanted to record as the instrumental soundtrack for a proposed sci-fi film, all of which was based on his unpublished novel called Beyond Morgia: The Labyrinths Of Klimster. Beyond Morgia was recorded at Armstrong Studios one weekend in June 1976, with the guys from Southern Electric on hand. The tapes went missing for many years, presumed lost forever but they recently surfaced. The album itself is an incredibly eclectic and diverse assortment of music: vast swathes of glacial keyboard notes with Loyde's unique, soaring psych-rock guitar work to the fore. It is classic space rock, beginning with a brooding electronic pulse (think early Tangerine Dream circa Electronic Meditation and Alpha Centauri), before building to a climactic guitar crescendo that echoes Pink Floyd at their most spacious and futuristic (think Ummagumma and Meddle -- with just a hint of Hawkwind's wind-tunnelling space explorations from Space Ritual). On top of that are Loyde's classical music influences, in particular his great love of Wagner and Beethoven, which come out in much of the music. Finally seeing the light of day -- 31 years after it was recorded -- Beyond Morgia: The Labyrinths Of Klimster is a worthy addition to the diverse catalog of the great Lobby Loyde."
    $20.00
  • This is what the ancient bearded one has to say:"Morgan Ågren is one of the great drummers of our time. Best known for his work with Mats/Morgan Band, he's also a fine composer and musical thinker.Since the mid 2000s, one of his interests have been to combine the intense jazz/rock stylings of the Mats/Morgan's earlier work with more contemporary technology, stylings and sounds (think 'beats' and 'electronica'); while those words might scare some folks reading this away, if you liked the sound of "Thanks For Flying With Us" and "[schack tati]", you've heard what I am talking about.He's been working on this album for the last number of years and it's very much a companion to "[schack tati]" stylistically, some of it completely solo (but not solo drums by any means) and some of it with Mats, as well as Devin Townsend, Fredrik Thordendal, Jimmy Ågren, Simon Steensland and others. Highly recommended! Released only in Japan, in a elegant, mini-lp sleeve!"
    $20.00
  • With nearly forty-five minutes of brand new material, Turning Tides represents MALPRACTICE at their absolute best, combining intricate progressive metal with catchy melodies topped with excellent musicianship and brilliant vocal harmonies. Professionally recorded by the members of the band at various locations, Turning Tides was produced by the band’s Joonas Koto and Toni Paananen and engineered by Koto, then mixed and mastered by Anssi Kippo at Astra-Studio A and enshrouded by intriguing artwork and design work by Miikka Tikka.“The lyrical theme of the album is about a guy who is very well educated. In fact so educated and talented that he can't land a job for himself due to over education,” collectively issued the members of MALPRACTICE. “He kind of falls in-between things and ends up in the suburbs unemployed and frustrated. He is ‘the best kept secret’ since no one wants to hire him. His life and sanity starts to fall apart due to his frustration and depression. He tries to fight the system but always ends up deeper and deeper in apathy. The story can be somewhat related to MALPRACTICE's struggle to make it for two decades already. The question is: ‘Is the guy me? You? Or every one of us?’” 
    $13.00
  • Die-cut digipak edition."One thing already in the beginning. Dark Age continues with their change. If this is good or bad each of you have to evaluate personally.  I like the new album, as well as I liked their more death metallic history. The guys from Hamburg are more and more filling a gap between Linkin Park (70%) and In Flames (30%). That will say, that there are still some, almost hidden, death metal part in some of the songs, but the melodic parts are still increasing and the usage of keyboards became more. In that sense “A matter of trust” is a logical next step following their 2009 album “Acedia”.So what is, next to ‘change’, the consistent factor. Dark Age are still writing good songs. The songwriting quality didn’t change. And the band also comes up again with a very good production – maybe it’s even too perfect in the sense of being too clean.The album starts with “Nero”, a song which represents the album in a good way. The song is very melodic, and a great chorus. In the verse I was even party reminded to Simple Minds with some rougher guitar work. “My savior” makes use of the same pattern, but increases intensity towards the end.Songs like “Out of time”  and “Fight” show more the history of the band. The remind me in parts to the “Dark age” album.  “Dark sign” is a good mix between old and new. It combines old trademarks with a dark atmosphere.And than there are a few very keyboard focused tracks on the album. Songs like “Onwards” are probably not even metal anymore, even though I like it. But the guitar is pushed very much to the back and the keys are dominating the scene.“A matter of trust” became a good album. But it also needs an open mind to enjoy it. If you got over the fact that the album didn’t became another “Dark age” you will have a enjoy what you hear. If you’re deeply rooted in death metal I would recommend to go for the new Master album instead." - Markus' Heavy Music Blog
    $15.00
  • Kindly Bent To Free Us is the long awaited third album from Cynic.  It finds the core trio of Paul Masvidal, Sean Reinert, and Sean Malone intact.  Just as Traced In Air was an evolution from Focus, so is Kindly Bent To Free Us a natural sounding progression from Traced In Air.  There is a common underlying sound which is clearly Cynic.  The music still maintains metallic and jazz roots but it serves as a foundation for a sound that owes more to prog rock.  If you are expecting Focus you will be disappointed.  This probably owes more to Porcupine Tree and Riverside as its not quite as technical as in the past, relying more on atmosphere.  But don't get me wrong, there is some unbelievable playing going on.  Once again Sean Malone demonstrates that he is the most underrated bassist in the world.  Highly recommended.This box set features a deluxe faux book with faux leather finish and gold foil print including “Kindly Bent to Free Us” in Digisleeve CD with the exclusive bonus track “Earth Is My Witness”, and numerous exclusive items including a poster, lyrics booklet, notation sheets booklet, and 5 transparent slides of additional artwork. Limited to 1000 copies worldwide!
    $66.00