My Funny Valentine ($5 Special)

"Miles Davis' concert of February 12, 1964, was divided into two LPs, with all of the ballads put on My Funny Valentine. These five lengthy tracks (specifically, "All of You," "Stella by Starlight," "All Blues," "I Thought About You," and the title cut) put the emphasis on the lyricism of Davis, along with some strong statements from tenor saxophonist George Coleman and freer moments from the young rhythm section of pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams. This hour-long LP complements the up-tempo romps of Four & More." - Allmusic

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  • Horn Culture is a nice spiritual jazz session led by the legendary saxophonist.  It dates back to 1973 and most of the musicians actually plug in.  Yoshiaki Masuo is the guitarist (some of you may know his great "24" album only released in Japan).  Walter Davis is playing electric piano and Bob Crenshaw is on electric bass.  David Lee is on drums and the great Mtume is on percussion.  Worth it just for the near 12 minute "Sais".
    $6.00
  • "Many modern CDs come adorned with stickers spewing outrageous superlatives about the contents. Here’s a sticker of my own: Warning To Record Labels: Any Sticker That Reads Best New Band/CD Release Of The Year Will Be Instantly Thrown In The Bin By Any Seasoned Reviewer.However, when Raven stickered their reissue of The Headhunters’ Survival Of The Fittest with the title “The ultimate space-funk album,” they weren’t lying. If they’d written “the ultimate space-funk-jazz album,” they would have been even more accurate.Emerging from Herbie Hancock’s immortal Head Hunters album, The Head Hunters were saxophonist Bennie Maupin, bassist Paul Jackson, guitarist DeWayne ‘Blackbird’ McKnight, percussionist Bill Summers and drummer Michael Clark. This is the same line-up that can be heard on the live album Hancock album, Flood.Released in 1975, Survival Of The Fittest was the band’s debut sans Hancock and made its statement loud and clear in the opening track, ‘God Made Me Funky’ with Maupin launching into an intergalactic sax solo (and featuring backing vocals from The Pointer Sisters!).This Raven reissue offers all six Survival Of The Fittest tracks, showcasing the elastic groove and instrumental virtuosity of this line-up, plus seven bonus tracks lifted from the outfit’s subsequent album, Straight From The Gate, for which they were joined by keyboard player Paul Potyen and singer Derrick Youman. The latter stuff is a little more conventional, delving deeper into vocal funk, but no less fun." - Rhythms.com
    $18.00
  • 2CD limited edition of the latest and most likely last album from this long running French prog ensemble.Nemo is led by guitarist JP Louveton.  While his guitar is the musical focal point of the band there is more than enough keyboard work to attract the attention of any fan of symphonic rock.  Louveton's fretwork adds lots of flash and heaviness but it never crosses over into metal territory.  Sadly the band has announced that they are going on hiatus after this album and it may well be their ending statement.We are offering the 2CD digipak.  In addition to the core album, which itself features all long form compositions, you get a nice bonus disc.  It features covers of Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin as well as a song trilogy based on Dante's Divine Comedy.  Highly recommended.
    $16.00
  • Remastered edition comes with bonus material - the single version of "Highways To The sun" plus six liv tracks recorded for BBC In Concert. Mark Powell pulled out all the stops with detailed liner notes. Richard Sinclair replaced Doug Ferguson on bass and Mel Collins joined on sax. This took the music in a bit of a Canterbury direction. Its a masterpiece.
    $9.00
  • "Brothers and Sisters, the Allman Brothers Band's first new studio album in two years, shows off a leaner brand of musicianship, which, coupled with a pair of serious crowd-pleasers, "Ramblin' Man" and "Jessica," helped drive it to the top of the charts for a month and a half and to platinum record sales. This was the first album to feature the group's new lineup, with Chuck Leavell on keyboards and Lamar Williams on bass, as well as Dickey Betts' emergence as a singer alongside Gregg Allman. The tracks appear on the album in the order in which they were recorded, and the first three, up through "Ramblin' Man," feature Berry Oakley -- their sound is rock-hard and crisp. The subsequent songs with Williams have the bass buried in the mix, and an overall muddier sound. The interplay between Leavell and Betts is beautiful on some songs, and Betts' slide on "Pony Boy" is a dazzling showcase that surprised everybody. Despite its sales, Brothers and Sisters is not quite a classic album (although it was their best for the next 17 years), especially in the wake of the four that had appeared previously, but it served as a template for some killer stage performances, and it proved that the band could survive the deaths of two key members." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Believe it or not this is where it all began for me. After coming home from school one day I saw Rick Wakeman on the Mike Douglas show. He was this odd looking guy with long blonde hair and a flowing cape to match. He had an arsenal of keyboards making strange sounds...it was "The Battle". That appearance led me down to Sam Goody's to buy my first prog album - Journey To The Centre Of The Earth. Sure it's pompous, overblown, whatever. I still have fond memories of it and love Wakeman's elaborate keyboard work and the band's integration with the orchestra. A personal classic.
    $5.00
  • "The musical transition that seemed to have just begun with Fear of Music came to fruition on Talking Heads' fourth album, Remain in Light. "I Zimbra" and "Life During Wartime" from the earlier album served as the blueprints for a disc on which the group explored African polyrhythms on a series of driving groove tracks, over which David Byrne chanted and sang his typically disconnected lyrics. Remain in Light had more words than any previous Heads record, but they counted for less than ever in the sweep of the music. The album's single, "Once in a Lifetime," flopped upon release, but over the years it became an audience favorite due to a striking video, its inclusion in the band's 1984 concert film Stop Making Sense, and its second single release (in the live version) because of its use in the 1986 movie Down and Out in Beverly Hills, when it became a minor chart entry. Byrne sounded typically uncomfortable in the verses ("And you may find yourself in a beautiful house, with a beautiful wife/And you may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?"), which were undercut by the reassuring chorus ("Letting the days go by"). Even without a single, Remain in Light was a hit, indicating that Talking Heads were connecting with an audience ready to follow their musical evolution, and the album was so inventive and influential, it was no wonder. As it turned out, however, it marked the end of one aspect of the group's development and was their last new music for three years." - Allmusic Guide
    $6.00
  • For my taste this is one of the best PT albums in years. Highly recommended.
    $8.00
  • "Kiko Loureiro is the guitar virtuoso from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At 19, Loureiro joined the metal band, Angra in 1991. In 2005, Loureiro released his first solo album, No Gravity. Loureiro started a project called Neural Code in 2009 with drummer Cuca Teixeira and bassist Thiago Espirito Santo. He has maintained a successful career both with his band and as a solo performer releasing seven studio albums with Angra and three solo albums. Loureiro has now released his forth solo studio album, Sounds Of Innocence.With his fourth studio album, Loureiro takes influences from jazz, blues, traditional Brazilian music, and mixes it with progressive metal to create an album full of fresh sounds while remaining true to his progressive metal roots. Felipe Andreoli and Virgil Donati provide bass and drums for Sounds Of Innocence.Within the first few seconds of “Gray Stone Gateway” you can see why Loureiro has been ranked as one of the top guitarists in the world. He provides some amazing guitar solos throughout this song. The solos are performed at incredible speeds, and should really be listened to fully appreciate. Felipe Andreoli and Virgil Donati do a good job at keeping up with this pace to make for a full energy song.“El Guajiro” has a heavier and metal feeling than some of the other songs. Donati does an excellent job on drums on this song, and Andreoli helps to give this song a truly metal sound with his deep bass playing. Louriero is, of course, excellent on this song, playing amazing techniques that almost boggles the mind to hear. Also of note, this song contains traditional Brazilian rhythm instruments being played that help to keep the song fresh.The more progressive rock sounding, “Mãe D'Água,” is a great instrumental track that showcases Loureiro’s guitar abilities as well as several other instruments. Loureiro plays slower solos on this track, but still articulates his message very well using jazz influences to create a great rock song. Donati and Andreoli provide great accompaniment to Loureiro’s guitar sounds.Kiko Loueiro is one of the best guitar players alive, and with Sounds Of Innocence he shows that he will only continue to get better as time goes by. His latest album is a great piece of progressive metal art. Anybody who loves amazing guitar skills should check out Kiko Loueiro. You won’t be disappointed with Sounds Of Innocence." - Prog Rock Music Talk
    $13.00
  • I have to plead ignorance.  Until recently I never heard of Innes Sibun.  Turns out the guy is a world famous British electric blues guitarist.  Back in 1993 he was a member of Robert Plant's touring band and has a signficant solo career.  Can't Slow Down was recorded with his quartet live at the Estro in Harderwijk, Netherlands on March 12, 2011.  This disc burns beginning to end.  If you are a fan of Rory Gallagher or Roy Buchanan and even guitarists along the lines of Hendrix and Trower you need to hear this guy.  Serious wah wah laced guitar driven excursions with backing of keys and a solid rhythm section.  A scorcher!!  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • "Calling the Dixie Dregs a fusion band doesn't really do them justice. Granted, their music is full of the complicated forms, jazz-influenced improvisations, and heavy rock attitude of the genre, but the Dregs also incorporate country, folk, and classical elements into their compositions. Although there is more than a little of the 1970s fusion of Jeff Beck and the Mahavishnu Orchestra in their music and especially on this record, the Dixie Dregs transcend these genre limitations so well that they might as well be performing in a different idiom. On What If, their finest album, Steve Morse and company breathtakingly illustrate their peculiar musical vision. As per standard operating procedure, Morse is the primary composer and chief sonic architect. He is blessed with some of the greatest technique in rock guitar, and he utilizes every facet of it, whether burning unison runs with violinist Allen Sloan, chunking heavy, palm-muted lines along with bassist Andy West, or playing impressively contrapuntal classically inflected nylon-string guitar. Morse also has a very distinctive composing voice, and this shines through on seven of the eight tracks. The strongest moments on What If are Morse songs that incorporate a more folky influence into the fusion, such as the almost straight-up country of "Gina Lola Breakdown." Also impressive is West's lone songwriting contribution, "Travel Tunes." This song lives up to its name by moving between melodies apparently derived from British folk music, angular fusion grooves, a Caribbean-sounding interlude, and straight-up rock & roll. The fact that the Dixie Dregs do this is a credit to their creativity; the fact that it works is a testament to their musicianship. This is music without labels -- emotional and logical at the same time, passionately played, and immaculately conceived. It is worth every penny." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Fourth album from this outstanding jazz metal band from Hungary getting outside exposure with their signing to IQ's Giant Electric Pea label.  Special Providence started out their career as a pure fusion band - not unlike Tribal Tech and Return To Forever.  With their third album, Soul Alert, the band injected a heavier metal presence primarily in the guitarwork.  Essence Of Change carries on from Soul Alert in terms of heaviness and the use of distortion but at the same time there is clearly more of a jazz/fusion emphasis in the writing.  This gives us a nicely balanced sound that has a lot of cross over appeal.  Liquid Tension Experiment and Morglbl fans will love this and I expect open minded fans of RTF and Mahavishnu will enjoy hearing the young kats update the sound they developed in the 70s.  Expect a non-stop assault of laser beam synth solos and blistering distortion laced guitar solos.  Yeah this one hits the sweet spot and after many future spins I suspect this will sit at the top of their already impressive discography.  BUY OR DIE!!
    $15.00
  • John Sund is an overlooked but superb fusion guitarist from Denmark.  This is an astounding album he recorded in 1993 with the Danish Radio Big Band as well as his band.  Its a full integration of musicians with Sund displaying some blazing chops.  Quite mature work that strikes me as a cross between a Terje Rypdal album and Banco's Di Terra.  A beautiful marriage of rock and jazz.  We scored cheap copies.  Grab them while we have them.  Highly recommended.
    $8.00
  • "The first Mahavishnu Orchestra's original very slim catalog was padded out somewhat by this live album (recorded in New York's Central Park) on which the five jazz/rock virtuosos can be heard stretching out at greater length than in the studio. There are only three selections on the disc, all of which were to have been on the group's then-unissued third album -- two of them, guitarist John McLaughlin's "Trilogy: Sunlit Path/La Merede la Mer" and keyboardist Jan Hammer's "Sister Andrea," are proportioned roughly as they were in their studio renditions, while the third, McLaughlin's "Dream," is stretched to nearly double its 11-minute studio length. Each develops organically through a number of sections, and there are fewer lockstep unison passages than on the earlier recordings. McLaughlin is as flashy and noisy as ever on double-necked electric guitar, and Hammer and violinist Jerry Goodman are a match for him in the speed department, with drummer Billy Cobham displaying a compelling, raw power and dexterity to his work as well, especially on the CD edition, which also gives bassist Rich Laird a showcase for his slightly subtler work. Yet for all of the superb playing, one really doesn't hear much music on this album; electricity and competitive empathy are clearly not enough, particularly on the 21-minute "Dream," which left a lot of fans feeling let down at the end of its side-two-filling run on the LP. In the decades since this album was released, the studio versions of these three pieces, along with other tracks being worked up for their third album, have appeared as The Lost Trident Sessions -- dating from May and June of 1973 -- thus giving fans a means of comparing this repertory to what the band had worked out (or not worked out) in the studio; and Between Nothingness and Eternity has come up a bit in estimation as a result, benefiting as it does from the spontaneity and energy of a live performance, though even that can only carry this work so far -- beyond the personality conflicts that broke up the band, they seem to have been approaching, though not quite reaching, a musical dead end as well." - Allmusic
    $5.00