This Mortal Coil (2CD)

Fifth studio album from one of the pre-eminent US progressive metal bands. Redemption is led by guitarist Nick Van Dyk and features Fates Warning vocalist Ray Alder. Redemption albums are always hallmarked with deep and meaningful lyrical content. This is not lightweight fluff. Neil Kernon was brought on board to produce and the results finds a more aggressive sound but one that stays true to the bands progressive roots. Personally, Ark's Burn The Sun with the exception, I was never a fan of Tommy Newton's production. I think Neil's style fits the band much better and he was able to extract an overall heaviness from the band that they never were able to achieve before. There is a ton of material here - 72 minutes. In addition you get a bonus CD featuring 6 cover tunes. Highest recommendation.

Product Review

Thu, 2011-10-06 12:58
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0
A step backwards in my opinion. Not as good as Snowfall ....Production is muddy. Equally disappointing was their UK performance last week...Next. S UK
Tue, 2011-10-11 09:44
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0
Sorry, forgot to change the rating on previous review... S UK
Fri, 2011-10-14 21:52
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0
After about 10 spins in 3 days I have come to the conclusion that I like it alot. Yes the production leaves something to be desired-not sure if it was done on purpose-but it is still a great listen and the music and lyrics to me are the best so far by my favorite band.
Tue, 2011-10-18 12:52
Rate: 
0
Redemtpion didn't reinvent themselves with this album. But its a good album and a bit heavier. Solid effort.
Fri, 2011-10-21 16:23
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0
Nothing surprising here. A good product but not an essential one. The production is good but not exceptionnal (for a group of that level). The packaging is well done and the musicianship are excellent.
Sun, 2011-10-23 22:02
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0
About time a prog metal band decides to injest some testosterone into their sound. This is possibly the best sounding prog mteal release ever,the songwriting has been stepped up yet another notch,Ray saounds killer,love the harmonies.I will put this up there with the best CDs ever released in this genre.Not recomended for anyone who likes typical wimpy sounding by the numbers prog,highly recomended for everyone else who has loved this band and loves their metal in their face
Tue, 2011-10-25 11:12
Rate: 
0
Redemption is my favorite band and I love all of their albums, with the exception of their first album; probably because Ray wasn't on vocals. Anyway, the album does seem to be a step backwards in my opinion, but I do enjoy it.
Sat, 2011-10-29 10:46
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0
Redemption's THIS MORTAL COIL is easily the darkest album they've ever released -- how could it be otherwise, when it's about guitarist/keyboardist's Nick van Dyk's battle with cancer? -- but it's also the most solid disc they've ever done, and best concept album since Ayreon's HUMAN EQUATION. Some people don't like the production; I think it sounds fine. "The preciousness of life The lesson that I've learned That I've learned, that you've learned And that we all are learning still (where is your victory? where is your sting?)" And to think these guys started their career with songs about Stephen King and Ray Bradbury stories.
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Product Review

Thu, 2011-10-06 12:58
Rate: 
0
A step backwards in my opinion. Not as good as Snowfall ....Production is muddy. Equally disappointing was their UK performance last week...Next. S UK
Tue, 2011-10-11 09:44
Rate: 
0
Sorry, forgot to change the rating on previous review... S UK
Fri, 2011-10-14 21:52
Rate: 
0
After about 10 spins in 3 days I have come to the conclusion that I like it alot. Yes the production leaves something to be desired-not sure if it was done on purpose-but it is still a great listen and the music and lyrics to me are the best so far by my favorite band.
Tue, 2011-10-18 12:52
Rate: 
0
Redemtpion didn't reinvent themselves with this album. But its a good album and a bit heavier. Solid effort.
Fri, 2011-10-21 16:23
Rate: 
0
Nothing surprising here. A good product but not an essential one. The production is good but not exceptionnal (for a group of that level). The packaging is well done and the musicianship are excellent.
Sun, 2011-10-23 22:02
Rate: 
0
About time a prog metal band decides to injest some testosterone into their sound. This is possibly the best sounding prog mteal release ever,the songwriting has been stepped up yet another notch,Ray saounds killer,love the harmonies.I will put this up there with the best CDs ever released in this genre.Not recomended for anyone who likes typical wimpy sounding by the numbers prog,highly recomended for everyone else who has loved this band and loves their metal in their face
Tue, 2011-10-25 11:12
Rate: 
0
Redemption is my favorite band and I love all of their albums, with the exception of their first album; probably because Ray wasn't on vocals. Anyway, the album does seem to be a step backwards in my opinion, but I do enjoy it.
Sat, 2011-10-29 10:46
Rate: 
0
Redemption's THIS MORTAL COIL is easily the darkest album they've ever released -- how could it be otherwise, when it's about guitarist/keyboardist's Nick van Dyk's battle with cancer? -- but it's also the most solid disc they've ever done, and best concept album since Ayreon's HUMAN EQUATION. Some people don't like the production; I think it sounds fine. "The preciousness of life The lesson that I've learned That I've learned, that you've learned And that we all are learning still (where is your victory? where is your sting?)" And to think these guys started their career with songs about Stephen King and Ray Bradbury stories.
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