Mindrevolutions

SKU: IOMACD208
Label:
Inside Out Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Third album since the resurrection of this Swedish symphonic band led by keyboardist Hans Lundin and guitarist Roine Stolt. No major surprises here - symphonic rock perhaps a bit in the vein of Flower Kings. FK bassist Jonas Reingold is here as is Ritual vocalist Patrick Lundstrom. Female vocals are quite prominent and supplied by the single-named Aleena. Mats & Morgan monster drummer Morgan Agren holds down the fort. The 26 minute title track is clearly the standout.

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