To The Metal! (CD/DVD Digipak BLOW OUT DEAL!)

Incredible warehouse find.  Scored a small horde of these and I can pass them on to you at an amazing price.

"Gamma Ray! Undoubtedly one of the most important names in contemporary, classic Heavy Metal, and thee most respected and influential German band in the genre. Fronted by Kai Hansen, following his departure from Helloween, Gamma Ray has become one of the most prominent bands in European Heavy Metal. "To The Metal" is the 10th studio album in 21 years of worldwide success and a new diamond in their never-ending experimental creativity. The Special Edition contains a bonus DVD in HD with interview, rehearsals, live studio sessions and 3 videoclips."

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  • Their first effort following the breakup of Sanctuary.
    $8.00
  • "Quite the misleading band name, ya know? Project Arcadia isn’t much of a “project” as it is a Bulgarian outfit fronted by the ever-awesome Urban Breed, he of Tad Morose, Bloodbound, and currently, Trail of Murder fame. Prior to Breed joining, the band released From the Desert of Desire in 2012 to rather muted results, as in, no one on this side of the pond gave a flying toss. Sure enough, add Breed to the fold, record a new album in the form of A Time of Changes, and viola, Nightmare Records takes care of the rest. Not a bad deal.Hovering around traditional power metal and 80s metal protocol (the accompanying bio cites MSG and the Scorpions, which there is scant correlation), Project Arcadia wisely focus on the considerable vocal talents of Mr. Breed. He’s given ample breathing room to allow for his superbly melodic and hefty pipes to get their kicks, like on the soaring chorus for “I Am Alive,” and the acoustic-led “The Ungrateful Child,” which sees the Swede go full-on tender. But for the most part, the band plays it muscular, hitting some brute riffs in stride on “Formidable Foe” or finding some double-bass happenings on opener “Here to Learn.”The addition of Breed is sure to bolster Project Arcadia’s profile immediately. However, being that Breed is also known for being a bit of metallic nomadic, one had to wonder how long he’ll stick it out with the band. But the songs are certainly here on A Time of Changes, suited perfectly for Breed, who ten years after his shining moment on Tad Morose’s Modus Vivendi, can still hang with the best of ‘em. If the Swede was smart (and he is), he’ll stick with this, and Trail of Murder and keep on being productive…" - Dead Rhetoric
    $12.00
  • Fireballet's much maligned second album Two, Too finally receives an authorized release.  Much of the criticism of the 1976 album stems from the awful cover art.  Its definitely something those guys wish they could take back and in a sense they did since they used something different for this CD.  All the prog rock elements of the first album are still in place but the tunes are a little bit shorter and the production is definitely slicker.  Its also clear that Yes became a big influence on the band - check out "It's About Time".  Frankly if you listen to the album objectively it has a lot of merits.  Does it stand up to their first?  No...but it definitely offers something solid for prog fans with open ears.  Definitely worth revisiting.  Comes with one previously unreleased bonus track.
    $14.00
  • "Shall we let bygones be bygones PelleK? (Get it?, because the first song is… you know what, this joke would be a lot better if we had tracklists in our reviews). I’ve been a Qantice fan for a few years after hearing the band’s unbalanced, but very unique, debut album The Cosmocinesy, which was released in 2009. Qantice appealed to me on the grounds of its great symphonic elements, a couple of really addicting choruses, and just for sounding… different from any of their peers in progressive power metal. Something about the band struck me as sounding like a one-off project, probably assuming that, as unique and interesting as the band was, it would lack the appeal to get traction for a second album. Guitarist and bandleader Tony Beaufils surprised me however, and recruited the thoroughly despised, pop-star wannabe, terrible Youtube cover-making PelleK to record a followup.Qantice’s second effort, The Phantonauts, is a highly eclectic, progressive power metal album with a mountain of peripheral, sometimes symphonic attempts, including the admirable efforts of violin player Yosh Otias, the only musician other than Beaufils to carry over from the debut. Qantice casts itself in the non-existent genre of “movie soundtrack metal,” which, despite not being a thing, is still a lot of fun to listen to. There’s a rich sound palette at work, with some standout flute parts, and a ton of synths which appear to be uncredited. In addition to Otias, Qantice also has a female bass player, Christine Lanusse, and if PelleK was castrated at a young age like I suspect, that makes the first half-female band in progressive metal history.If I keep making fun of PelleK though, I’m never going to get around to actually telling you about this album, on which he’s not even that much of a factor. This is certainly his best vocal performance, and while he’s singing with more power than ever, it’s still incredibly sugary. I wasn’t terribly offended by his last solo album either, and I’ve always felt his biggest weakness was bad songwriting. If I could hear these songs from the vocalist on the debut, I’d prefer it, but PelleK does a fine job. Much more important to the band’s sound are the incredibly deep soundscapes and much-improved rhythm sections, courtesy of the influence of new drummer Aurelien Joucla. If I had to point to the most significant addition in this new lineup, it would certainly be him.Joucla’s contributions are best felt on the first two songs, “Epic Fail,” and “Hoverland.” They are plenty fast and catchy enough to pull in any respectable power metal fan, but far more intricate and musically involved than typical symphonic power metal fair. From there, the music shifts to a few slower and mid-tempo songs, while jumping into the faster stuff when necessary, but it feels like a bit of a letdown after such a forceful opening. What makes up for that drop off is the symphonic attitude. Luca Turilli has been trumpeting himself as a king of ‘movie soundtrack metal’ for years, but I won’t hesitate to say that Tony Beaufils is thoroughly better at the task. Every song is just so engaging, both in melody and in the choice of varied instrumentation to create incredibly cool soundscapes. There’s your typical high strings and choirs, but then there’s what I’m pretty sure is a theremin in the intro of the title track, and a violin/guitar unison shred solo in “Slayers Jig.”Even though “The Last Circus” is one of the more interesting tracks on the record, it’s also the slowest, and winds on for far too long. I know I start to approach broken record with this stuff, but I do not want to hear power metal singers doing overlong, slow songs. Outside of that, The Phantonauts is really engaging, well produced, and with solid performances all around. Following about the only French trend, it will give you quite a unique listening experience. If ‘better symphonic metal than Luca Turilli’ doesn’t hook you, I don’t know what will." - Blackwind Metal
    $15.00
  • Ten Great Tracks + Four Collectable SnapshotsA collection of ten great Dio hits. Feature classics from such albums as Holy Diver, Last In Line and Heaven and Hell. Includes 4 collectable Snapshot inserts.Track List:Holy Diver(Live)PushFever DreamsWe Rock(live)Long Live Rock 'n Roll(live)Stargazer(live)Heaven And Hell(live)Children Of The Sea(live)Eat Your Heart Out(live)Killing The Dragon
    $3.00
  • One of the most important progressive rock albums ever recorded. New 2007 Nick Davis remix. 
    $12.00
  • Alive & Well Recorded In Paris has been out of print for many years. Esoteric Recordings uncovered the original multitrack tapes and presented an expanded edition.The original sessions were recorded in Paris in 1977. This lineup featured John Etheridge on guitar and Ric Sanders on violin as lead instruments. It was a vastly different sounding version of Soft Machine - at this point there were well into their fusion phase. The bonus disc features 45 minutes of unreleased material from these live recordings as well as 2 tracks from a single they released on Harvest. Of course you get an expanded booklet with nice liner notes. Typical great Esoteric job. Highly recommended.
    $20.00
  • Kindly Bent To Free Us is the long awaited third album from Cynic.  It finds the core trio of Paul Masvidal, Sean Reinert, and Sean Malone intact.  Just as Traced In Air was an evolution from Focus, so is Kindly Bent To Free Us a natural sounding progression from Traced In Air.  There is a common underlying sound which is clearly Cynic.  The music still maintains metallic and jazz roots but it serves as a foundation for a sound that owes more to prog rock.  If you are expecting Focus you will be disappointed.  This probably owes more to Porcupine Tree and Riverside as its not quite as technical as in the past, relying more on atmosphere.  But don't get me wrong, there is some unbelievable playing going on.  Once again Sean Malone demonstrates that he is the most underrated bassist in the world.  Highly recommended.
    $11.00
  • Super session put together by Tobias Stammet, vocalist of Edguy. Lineup reads like a who's who of power/speed metal: Kai Hansen, David DeFeis, Andre Matos, Oliver Hartmann, Sharon Den Adel, Rob Rock, Timo Tolkki on vocals. Musiciasn include Henjo Richter, Markus Grosskopf, and Alex Holzwarth. Basically an over the top power metal opera!
    $13.00
  • Liquorish Allsorts is the first solo album from Robert Webb, keyboardist for the legendary Britsh band England.  The set collects a variety of material from different era, dating all the way back to the early 70s and runs up to the present day.  Much of the material fits firmly in the prog category and some of it...not so much.  There are an endless number of musicians that contribute to the set including his former England bandmates.  Even Nicko McBrain is here!  Current musicians participating are drawn from Kenso and Resistor.
    $12.00
  • Excellent new sci-fi prog metal project put together by Carptree mainman and keyboardist Carl Westholm. While Westholm is probably better known for his involvement with Carptree he has also been working in the metal field for many years in bands like Abstract Algebra, Krux, and Candlemass.Westholm has assembled an interesting cast of musicians for this larger than life Ayreon-style project. First off, Mats Leven in handling vocals. Right there that is enough for me. Leif Edling, the driving force behind Candlemass plays bass and helps with lyrics. What else do you need? Various members of Carptree and others fill out the heavily symphonic sound lending an epic scope and feel. Highly recommended.
    $3.00
  • Originally released in 2012 on vinyl (and apparently cassette), the second album from this Scottish based space quartet finally gets a CD release...but its a limited edition of 500 copies so you might want to be snappy.The Cosmic Dead wear their influences on their sleeves.  The music is heavily invested in the sounds of Ash Ra Tempel, Can, and even a touch of early Hawkwind.  Loooooong jams that take you further and further into deep space.  A non-stop assault of burbling synths, echoplexed guitar leads, and a rhythm section that is playing off in another galaxy.  Pure unadulterated psychedelic space rock.  These guys played the Roadburn Festival and I'm sure they must have gone down a storm.  If the numbers 7 - 1 - 4 mean anything to you then I think this should be filed away in your collection.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • "Central to the album are tracks like "Beautiful" and "Missing," each bristling with redemptive lyrical and vocal power, Dug near evangelical above his chosen eccentric palette, one of abrasive textures and sublime melodies that emanate truths rather than delivering them primary-colored and sharp-angled.Says Dug: ""Beautiful" is one of my favorites: ‘Don't forget you’re beautiful.' Everything I sing about, even if I’m telling somebody something about themselves, I'm actually talking to myself, about something that I've been through. So I just go ‘you,’ instead of ‘me’ (laughs). There were many times I just never felt like I was any good, and a lot of us feel that way. So I just figured, hey, ‘Don't forget you’re beautiful.’ That's a good line. And I've seen people cry, listening to that song. And "Missing;" musically it just slams; just from the beginning, even before I put the lyrics on it, it's like, this song is going to work. It was just special for me. It has some kind of vibe that I wasn't used to, a whole new slant with respect to what I do."Lightening up from the dirty strip-mining of the record’s guttural tone is a little ditty called "Equal Rights." The song is pret’ near a bit of a revival hoe-down, and might be a surefire hit, in a different time, space and dimension."Yeah, that was fun," laughs Dug. "There was an old Larry Graham/Grand Central Station song, and Sly And The Family Stone used to do the sang type of thing. They used to sit around and do these harmonies, this black gospel kind of thing, and I grew up in that situation, so I put that together with the slide guitar. I picked up slide years and years ago, but never played it. On this record I play slide all over the place. So I sat down and started strumming a guitar, and I thought, you know, maybe I'll write some kind of old gospel-type song. ‘Equal rights for everyone,’ yeah!"
    $8.00