Mandala: SWF Session 1972

SKU: LHC00088
Label:
Long Hair Music
Category:
Jazz Rock
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Mind blowing set from this early 70s German jazz rock band culled from the vaults of SWF radio.  Dzyan was formed by bassist Reinhard Karwatky but the emerging star was guitarist Eddy Marron.  The lineup for these sessions is a quintet consisting of guitar, sax, bass, drums, and percussion.  High energy jazz rock with a psychedelic undercurrent is the order of the day.  Think Mahavishnu Orchestra crossed with Guru Guru.  Percussionist Jochen Leuschner also handles the occassional vocal.  He's got a great soulful voice that fits in comfortably.  High level of musicianship throughout but I have to mention Marron again - his playing really blows my mind.  Typical superb job from Long Hair Music - previously unavaialbe photos and detailed liner notes.  BUY OR DIE!

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