Live Stock ($5 SPECIAL)

SKU: 831414-2
Label:
Polydor
Category:
Blues Rock
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"By the time this long-player hit the street, Roy Buchanan (guitar/vocals) had already departed from his oft-acrimonious relationship with Polydor Records. To their credit, the label issued Live Stock (1975), which captured the artist in performance at Town Hall in New York City on November 27, 1974. This disc features the recently corralled combo of Bill Price (vocals), John Harrison (bass), Malcolm Lukens (keyboards), and Byrd Foster (drums/vocals). Interestingly, the instrumentalists would reconvene behind Buchanan for his next two studio albums, A Street Called Straight (1976) and Loading Zone (1977), as well as the thoroughly superior, import-only Live in Japan (2003). With the exception of the seminal Snakestretchers, this aggregate would stay with the guitarist for longer than any of his numerous other support bands. Practically by default, having returned Buchanan to the stage, the music instantly becomes more conducive to inspiration. The set list highlights both a sampling from earlier efforts, as well as a few covers that are personalized by Buchanan's inimitable stringed artistry. Whether by design or serendipity, each track focuses on his animated solos. Ranging from the driving boogie of Roy Milton's "Reelin' and Rockin" [note: not to be confused with Chuck Berry's rock & roll anthem of virtually the same name] to the stinging fretwork that commences the Memphis soul of Al Green's slithery "I'm a Ram," Buchanan is undeniably at the peak of his abilities. The spirited reading of "Further on up the Road" is particularly worthwhile, as his leads alternately from a rapid-fire slide action to emphatic wails that punctuate the melody with equal measures of deadly accuracy and limber precision. Live Stock is a primary recommendation for all dimensions of blues guitar lovers and those interested in experiencing the craftsmanship of the man once hailed as "The Greatest Unknown Guitarist In The World."" - Allmusic Guide

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  • Gorgeous solo album from Samsara Blues Experiment guitarist/leader Christian Peters.  He plays all the instruments on the album.  With the exception of one vocal track the album is all instrumental.  Its a hypnotic journey to another place and time that will remind you of early Popol Vuh and "Ummagumma" era Pink Floyd.  Sitar, acoustic guitars, and keys have a dreamy laid back quality that is simply mesmerizing.  Highly recommended. "In the liner notes for So Came Restless Night, Berlin-based multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Christian Peters mentions that he’d never intended to release anything under the moniker of this Soulitude project, but that it was the encouragement of the few for whom he played this material that finally brought him around to the idea of doing so. Peters, who serves also in the guitarist/vocalist role for Samsara Blues Experiment and doubles as the head of Electric Magic Records, which is releasing So Came Restless Night, conveys that kind of inward sensibility throughout the album’s nine songs. Instrumental but for the closer “All that’s Left Behind,” the 39-minute span of what has wound up as the debut release from Soulitude (for which Peters also handled the artwork/layout as part of his Sun Art visual side) keeps to a layered, exploratory feel that results in an intimate take on psychedelic/acid folk, Peters‘ penchant for sitar flourish, keys and mandolin adding depth to the arrangements while keeping a balance with the solo-project vibe. There are a variety of moods throughout, but most of them joyful, and for anyone who might know Peters‘ work from Samsara Blues Experiment or his time previously in Terraplane, the softer sound of Soulitude could come as a surprise, but I doubt it will. Much of the atmospherics he brings to So Came Restless Night, Peters has worked into the sensibilities of his other projects, so it’s less that Soulitude is coming out of nowhere than it is focusing on a different side of similar elements to what Peters has done all along. The lush acoustic and electric guitar interplay on the penultimate “Voices of the Forest” will be recognizable, and certainly his affinity for Eastern textures is carried over as well. Soulitude doesn’t come without context, but even for someone who perhaps isn’t familiar with Peters‘ work, there’s plenty here to latch onto for fans of acid folk and the solo psychedelia proffered by the likes of Lamp of the Universe.Peters originally self-released So Came Restless Night on CD-R in 2009, so technically the Electric Magic version is a reissue, but I’ve been thinking of it more as an official release for the solo-project, which was also remastered by Peters‘ Samsara Blues Experiment bandmate, Richard Behrens. Either way, the greater likelihood is that these songs will be new to those who hear them, and given the inherently classic nature of the material, it’s not like it comes across any more dated four years later than it’s meant to be. I don’t know what span of time these recordings were made — there’s a palpable jump in volume as the more synth-driven “Ballad of the Black Swan” gives way to “Last Farewell to Elisabeth” — but nothing really interrupts the molten flow that emerges song to song, and with Peters as the uniting and driving force behind the album’s 39 minutes, there’s little to account for in terms of hiccups. Interestingly, centerpiece “The Albatross” is credited to French poet Charles Baudelaire, but I’m not sure if it’s an interpretation of his poem of the same name or if there’s speech buried somewhere in the mix, because although the recordings throughout So Came Restless Night are relatively bare-bones — it’s not underproduced, but it’s self-made — there’s still a sense of dimension and of depth to each track, beginning with the airy guitars of “Intro,” which set up a subtle post-desert rock influence soon to emerge and find resolution on “Morninghope,” the winding notes of which spiral out in full color and provide an early highlight following the melodic effects wash of opener “Natural Mystic,” where effects mania (think: guitar as theremin) is buried under sweet electric guitar leads. Much of Peters‘ output is based on variations — he’ll work with electric guitar principally on “Morninghope,” acoustics and sitar on the subsequent “Awakening” — but if the album is assembled of these experiments, it’s not without some clear effort put into the construction. It moves easily and brings you with it.“The Albatross” is about as close as Peters comes to minimalism, keeping for a time an undercurrent of synth to sweet acoustic lines, but the back half of So Came Restless Night is more lush and packed also with longer titles — the last four tracks comprising four or more words each while the first five were one or two words — “Ballad of the Black Swan” generating something of a swirl before “Last Farewell to Elisabeth” complements the synth wash that track presents with layers of electric guitar, engaged in a deceptively bluesy solo. At this point, Soulitude is at its most immersive, and if you’re ever going to get lost in the record, it probably will have happened by the time the song’s 5:38 are over. That leaves “Voices of the Forest” and “All that’s Left Behind” to close out, the two songs accounting for about a quarter of the album’s total runtime and the vast majority of that going to “Voices of the Forest,” which is the longest cut on So Came Restless Night at 7:50. Unsurprisingly, the track takes its time unfolding its full breadth, but when it does, “Voices of the Forest” steps in line behind the acoustic guitar and presents the collection’s most definitively folkish moment. It makes for a gorgeous, fitting culmination, and while there are multiple ideas presented here I’d hope Peters could see fit to develop for future Soulitude material, I’d be most interested to hear how he might combine the ethics behind the instrumental build of “Voices of the Forest” and “All that’s Left Behind,” which is an automatic standout as the closer for being the only piece here with vocals. Peters‘ voice is no less suited to the quiet acoustic-led psych here than it is to some of Samsara Blues Experiment‘s more out-there jams — which is to say it’s quite well suited — and while it’s curious he’d end So Came Restless Night with vocals where the record preceding has none, neither is this out of place, feeling more like an arrival after “Voices of the Forest” than a departure to somewhere else musically. Such is the fluid nature of this material, and while I don’t know if Peters has any plans to continue on with new recordings as Soulitude — he does not seem to be lacking in ways to keep busy — there’s plenty of potential here for growth should he get a free minute to pick up the project somewhere down the line. And if that doesn’t happen, and So Came Restless Night is all there is, that’s okay too. These songs have held up pretty well already and I hear nothing in them to indicate they won’t continue to do so." - The Obelisk
    $15.00
  • This is a digibook edition of this classic Supertramp album.  Its long been an audiophile favorite and now it features a remaster via Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound.
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  • "The Phantom Agony marked the start of the now decade-long and world-wide career of the Dutch group EPICA. The album was recorded at The Gate Studio in Wolfsburg, Germany, under the leadership of the renowned producer and engineer Sacha Paeth (a.o. Aina, After Forever, Rhapsody, Kamelot) and at its release it was critically acclaimed to be one of the most impressive Dutch Epic Metal debut albums ever. The classically trained mezzo-soprano vocalist Simone Simons is a true revelation, confronting a complete choir & orchestra just as easily as she battles the shrouds clad grunts. But it is the incredible arrangements and production, this band of ex-After Forever guitarist Mark Jansen gives a unique place in Dutch rock history. “Pain and beauty blend into a musical experience that will saturate all the listener's senses”, one critic wrote after listening to the overwhelming CD. He could not have put it better.Ten years after its original release, The Phantom Agony is back in store. Remastered from the original master tapes, as a double CD. The expanded edition comes in a deluxe digipack and contains 15 bonus tracks, including 7 previously unreleased versions and one previously unreleased song. The 20 pages thick booklet will provide unique photos and memorabilia, plus liner notes by guitarist Mark Jansen.Track listingTMD-071  2CD EPICA - The Phantom Agony – Expanded EditionChapter 11. Adyta 1:27 “The Neverending Embrace”2. Sensorium 4:49 3. Cry for the Moon 6:44 "The Embrace that Smothers - Part IV"4. Feint 4:195. Illusive Consensus 5:00  6. Façade of Reality 8:10 "The Embrace that Smothers - Part V"7. Run for a Fall 6:31   8. Seif al Din 5:46 "The Embrace that Smothers - Part VI"9. The Phantom Agony 8:5910. Veniality 4:3711. The Phantom Agony 4:33 - single version12. Triumph of Defeat 3:54  Chapter 21. Adyta 1:28 - orchestral version2. Sensorium 4:53 – orchestral version3. Cry for the Moon 6:40 - orchestral version4. Feint 4:18 - orchestral version5. Illusive Consensus 5:02 - orchestral version6. Basic Instinct 4:07 - orchestral track7. Run for a Fall 6:26 – orchestral version8. The Phantom Agony 9:00 - orchestral version9. Veniality 4:35 - orchestral version10. Feint 4:53 - piano version11. Cry for the Moon 3:30 - single version12. Run for a Fall 4:29 - single versionTracks 1 - 8 previously unreleasedThese recordings have been exclusively restored and dynamicallyremastered in the 24-bit domain from the original digital masters"Debut release from the Dutch beauty and beast gothic metal band Epica. The band was put together by Mark Jensen, the former guitarist for After Forever. Musically speaking the similarities to After Forever are striking with mezzo-soprano vocalist Simone Simons acting as the counterpart to Floor Jansen. The music has that gothic epic grandeur with classical overtones through out. All of this is due to the always lush production of Sascha Paeth and the implementation of a large string section and choir. Apparently Jansen had a falling out with the rest of After Forever and essentially set up a parallel band. I can't say this is actually better than After Forever but on early listens I'd say it's pretty damn close or just as good. Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • "Alternative Rock is not a genre that graces my ears very often, but as always, they are open; as is my mind. The funny thing is, any time I am exposed to something I wouldn't normally find myself listening to, there is always something about that band that has my wanting attention for one reason or another, be it the sound of the vocalist, the mixing, or those infectious hooks in the chorus. For its genre, the ANNEKE VAN GIERSBERGEN (formerly AGUA DE ANNIQUE) is perfectly postulated and is a leading act, with their non-repetitive writing (something I hear too often in commercial rock), excellent vocals and songs leaving you burning with an urge to sing along.Their latest release, "Drive", is no exception; as an album, it proves to be versatile, with no two songs sounding identical, but every song keeping the rhythm and mood to make the album fit piece by piece. "We Live On" feels like a typical pop-rock track, upbeat and driving, with an extremely powerful vocal performance in the choruses by Van Giersbergen. "Treat Me Like A Lady" does not want to be treated like a lady, and takes a noticeably heavier tone, brimming with attitude. "She" begins ever so modestly, making us think we're brought back to some level of calm, but explodes into an incredibly fast-paced chorus for such a Rock band, and includes yet another infectious chorus; something that is fast becoming an obvious highlight. "Drive" – I adore the sound of the bass in this song, the way it is dislocated from the drums, adds another dynamic. Van Giersbergen's even more stellar performance in the chorus demonstrates her large vocal range and versatility. Save for electric bass, "My Mother Said" is an entirely acoustic song and is the softest, most heartfelt song on the album; the band's namesake flawlessly demonstrates her ability to fit her voice around any song to emote any mood wants. "Forgive Me" is especially different, demonstrating unusual chord progressions, totally different instrumentation, and revealing even more, the extent of control that Van Giersbergen has over her range. "You Will Never Change" is upbeat and punchy, through-and-through with an – okay, let us just assume that every song on this album has an infectious chorus; definitely one of my favorites on the album. "Mental Jungle" begins with a strange, Arabic-sounding vocal melody, also featured on the chorus; I do indeed also love this chorus, as well as the interesting chord progressions. Quite easily the most unique song on the album, it strays from the pipeline rock sound that this record has been purveying. "Shooting for the Stars" takes the cake for the 'radiorock' track on the album, where every note, every beat, every lyric, screams commercialism and airtime. Not necessarily a bad song, but not the most interesting on the album. The album closes with "The Best Is Yet To Come" which makes me thing, Anneke has even better music to offer us in the future? The song itself takes first place on the album for me; the presence of the overdriven guitars and bass compliment her voice perfectly to create a powerful and catchy, yet Heavy Rock track, with interesting and unpredictable licks and hooks.Van Giersbergen and her band are quickly cementing themselves as one of Europe's currently most powerful and gorgeous-sounding rock groups, whom don't necessarily always cling to the commercialized, radio cliché sound, although no doubt perfectly suited to long air time. Coming from a metal head who listens to a fair share of female singers, I believe she could sing anything she wanted to, and the band of musicians that have got together and recorded this organic album with her have done so masterfully, and I'm not sure if the best is yet to come." - Metal Temple
    $8.00
  • Remastered edition of the band's sixth album along with one bonus track. Released in 1979 it was an attempt by the reconstituted band to come up with a more contemporary sound. Although from a progressive rock standpoint it wasn't much of a success it was actually their best selling work. Go figure. By the way - this is where Eddy Schicke of SFF went after the band split.
    $14.00
  • "It seems these days that metal musicians collaborate with players from other bands quite a bit. Personally, I have mixed feelings when these collaborations happen. Sure, they can make some great music, but for some reason I tend to prefer what said players do with their main bands as opposed to their cross–band work. OSI is an exception to that.Started in 2002 by Fates Warning Guitarist Jim Matheos and former Dream Theater keyboardist Kevin Moore, OSI has remained a long–distance cooperative between the two. Several guest musicians have been brought in for each of their records, such as drummers Mike Portnoy and Gavin Harrison, bassists Sean Malone and Joey Vera, and vocalists Tim Bowness and Mikael Åkerfeldt. This most recent effort, their fourth, sees Gavin Harrison (Porcupine Tree) returning on drums, with Moore taking care of lyrics and main vocals. Matheos and Moore worked together on all other aspects of the music.As I said earlier, I typically listen to these kinds of albums once or twice and then return to their normal band’s material. But Fire Make Thunder isn’t an album to do that to; sure, it sounds very much like what you’d imagine this trio would create, but all three players are known for creating some great music on their own. And here, put together, they don’t disappoint.The opening track “Cold Call” and the follow–up “Guards” have a sort of sinister tone to it, but aren’t very aggressive tracks. “Indian Curse” is completely void of drums and percussion of any sort, and sounds rather bleak. It’s a good song, but don’t listen to it on a dark, rainy day in March. “Enemy Prayer” is much more metallic than its predecessors on the album, sounding a bit closer to what these two wrote in their main projects. It’s also an instrumental track, a key component of a prog metal record. “Big Chief II” continues the picked up the tempo a bit, and the guitars sound a bit angrier. But the vocals don’t really get that intense, lending a sense of control to the turmoil. “Invisible Men” clocks in at just under ten minutes long, so these two haven’t lost their touch when it comes to lengthy songs either.Thinking of something to compare this album to was difficult at first, but then it hit me. This album is like a horror movie that uses menace to scare, playing on the viewer’s mind, rather than excessive gore or monsters leaping suddenly out of nowhere. Granted, this music isn’t scary, but one can’t help but notice its dark tone. The ambience it captures is one of many things that make this album great. The album artwork is another–I like how the cover kind of reflects the primitive nature of the title, Fire Make Thunder.If the only kind of Prog Metal you’re into is twenty–minute songs with six trillion notes in them, this album won’t interest you in the slightest. None of these songs get even close to becoming exercises in technical wizardry. They are simply well written songs. Each one sounds unique enough that they don’t blend together. They’re short enough to keep just about any listener’s attention for the entire songs’ duration, and there’s enough creativity in each one to ensure that. Moore and Matheos have proved they can write material as well as any prog legend, without having to play more notes than God. This is an album both novices and prog experts will enjoy. Good job, OSI." - Muzikreviews.com
    $11.00
  • New 2CD mediabook edition features a remixed and remastered version of the album.  The bonus disc includes the Dawn Raids EPs plus a previously unreleased track.Tightly Unwound marks Pineapple Thief's departure from Cyclops, their label of many years. The band's visionary is Bruce Soord. His music is filled with melancholy - there is as much drama and passion as you would find from a Peter Hammill or Roger Waters album. Musically speaking this is modern progressive rock heavily derived from Porcupine Tree with some traces of Pink Floyd. Keyboards pretty much are in the background just providing texture and pads - this is guitar driven music...and it's angry!
    $15.00
  • Over a year ago we offered a limited edition version of this and its been out of print for some time.  This is a beautiful 2LP 180g vinyl gatefold edition with gorgeous new Roger Dean artwork.To celebrate the 40th anniversary of Journey To The Centre Of The Earth, Rick Wakeman recorded a studio version (remember it was a live album back in 1973).  Its shockingly great!  The new version includes 20 minutes of music that was originally written for the piece but never performed or recorded.  The album is recorded with a symphony orchestra as well as his usual cast of musicians.  Wakeman seems to be playing all analogue keyboards, or at least a hell of a lot of them.  Its a very faithful approximation of the performance you remember but with some new music, new vocalists.  Wrapping the whole thing up is a stellar, audiophile production.  Thankfully Mr. Wakeman understands the proper use of compression.  This album will blow the roof off your house.  Highly recommended.
    $29.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."After the failed experiment of Turbo, Judas Priest toned down the synths and returned to the basics, delivering a straight-ahead, much more typical Priest album with Ram It Down. The band's fan base was still devoted enough to consistently push each new album past the platinum sales mark, and perhaps that's part of the reason Ram It Down generally sounds like it's on autopilot. While there are some well-constructed songs, they tend toward the generic, and the songwriting is pretty lackluster overall, with the up-tempo title track easily standing out as the best tune here. And even though Ram It Down backed away from the territory explored on Turbo, much of the album still has a too-polished, mechanical-sounding production, especially the drums. Lyrically, Ram It Down is firmly entrenched in adolescent theatrics that lack the personality or toughness of Priest's best anthems, which -- coupled with the lack of much truly memorable music -- makes the record sound cynical and insincere, the lowest point in the Rob Halford era. Further debits are given for the cover of "Johnny B. Goode."" - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • "After the breakup of Deep Purple in 1976, guitarist Tommy Bolin wasted little time beginning work on his second solo album, Private Eyes. While it was more of a conventional rock album than its predecessor, Teaser (which served primarily as a showcase for his guitar skills and contained several jazz/rock instrumentals), it was not as potent. The performances aren't as inspired as those on Teaser or even those on Bolin's lone album with Deep Purple, Come Taste the Band, although there a few highlights could be found. The nine-minute rocker "Post Toastee" merges a long jam section with lyrics concerning the dangers of drug addiction, while "Shake the Devil" is similar stylistically. But Bolin wasn't simply a hard-rocker; he was extremely talented with other kinds of music: the quiet, acoustic-based compositions "Hello, Again" and "Gypsy Soul," and the heartbroken ballad "Sweet Burgundy." With his solo career starting to take shape (after the album's release, he opened for some of rock's biggest names: Peter Frampton, Jeff Beck, Rush, ZZ Top, etc.), Bolin's life was tragically cut short at the end of the year due to a drug overdose in Miami, FL." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • The late Michael Hedges was one of the great visionary guitarists of our lifetimes. He used tapping techniques on acoustic guitar to create a wall of sound. He was influenced by John Fahey and Leo Kottke and made us all rethink what can possibly be done with an acoustic guitar.  Introspective but addictive.  If you have any interest in guitar you need to hear this album.
    $8.00
  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hard card fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.Unicorn is a hot set recorded by noted Japanese bassist Teruo Nakamura.  It features killer players like George Cables (electric piano), Steve Grossman (soprano sax), Lenny White and Alphonse Mouzon (drums) among others.  Recorded in 1973 in NYC, its a wonder example of "spiritual" or "soul" jazz."Unicorn was bassist Teruo Nakamura's first date as a leader. Recorded and issued in Japan on the legendary Three Blind Mice imprint in 1973, Nakamura had been working in New York since 1964. He'd done a lot of hardscrabble work before 1969 when he landed the gig as bassist in Roy Haynes' fine group of the time. During that year he formed a band with Steve Grossman and Lenny White, who both appear here. This is an interesting date because it is equally divided between very electric fusion tracks and more modal acoustic numbers. Grossman plays on all but one cut; White appears on three. Other players include Alphonse Mouzon on three cuts (instead of White), George Cables on Rhodes, John Miller on acoustic piano, a young percussionist named Ronald Jackson (born Ronald Shannon Jackson), pianist Hubert Eaves III (later of D Train fame), trumpeter Charles Sullivan, vocalist Sandy Hewitt (on Eaves' "Understanding" and "Umma Be Me"). Nakamura plays acoustic upright bass on four tracks and electric on two others. The music is very much of its time, and though it is a session players gig, with rotating lineups, there is plenty of fire here. Grossman had already done his stint with Miles Davis and is in fine form on soprano (especially on the opening title cut), and tenor on John Coltrane's "Some Other Blues." White and Mouzon are both outstanding, so the drum chair is killer throughout, no matter who's playing, and Cables' Rhodes work on the Trane cut and "Derrick's Dance," written by Miller, is stellar. Nakamura, for his part, is more than an able bassist; he leads by guiding the rhythm and not standing out as a soloist." - Allmusic Guide
    $29.00
  • Their first real prog effort. Killer keyboard excursions in an ELP vein.
    $10.00
  • "Unwritten Pages’ Noah is an album born out of a passion for progressive, driving music, concept albums and 80’s science-fiction film. It combines the broad musical taste of its creator Frederic Epe and the stylistic and unique musical backgrounds of each project member, reaching from rock and metal to Latin influences and more classical/score-oriented arrangements.The album features soaring guitars, fat organs and bone-breaking drums, as well as a healthy dose of retro. But most of all, it never loses its focus on unique and melody-driven song-writing. And it comes in the form of an ambitious story, told through the eyes of the vocalists and musicians.Noah tells the story of a boy born in the ruins of the futuristic Utopia City, and Maria, the daughter of a ruthless politician who has – literally – split Utopia City in half and driven the poor to a district known as LS01X. As the political climate escalates, a few hundred people from both sides of the city are forced to leave their home world and start a new life on Mars. Here, both Maria and the boy grow up in the middle of a rising conflict between two factions that are unwilling to ignore their grudge-ridden past. Noah features the talents of Damian Wilson (Threshold, Ayreon, Les Misérables), Karl Groom (Threshold, Shadowland), Davy Mickers (Stream of Passion, Ayreon), Alejandro Millán (Hello Madness, Stream of Passion) and many others."
    $3.00