Lingua Franca (CD-EP)

Lingua Franca (CD-EP)

BY T.R.A.M.

(Customer Reviews)
$12.00
$ 7.20
SKU: SUM-CD-71
Label:
Sumerian Records
Category:
Jazz Rock
Add to wishlist 

A heavy jazz rock supergroup of sorts that comes completely out of left field. T.R.A.M. consists of Tosin Abasi and Javier Reyes (both from Animals As Leaders) on guitars, Adrian Terrazas-Gonzalez (The Mars Volta) on flute, sax, bass clarinet, and Eric Moore (Suicidal Tendencies) on drums. Yeah - weird lineup and considering where these guys come from, the music is really a shocker. This is a full blown jazz rock album with some heavier moments without veering into metal territory. Terrazas-Gonzalez' sax and flute is often the lead instrument but there is plenty of interplay between the AAL guys creating tons of fireworks. As I'm trying to convey there is serious blowing going on here and at times it can get a bit skronky but it rarely strays far from a melody. At times the guitarists interlock reminding a bit of Fripp and Belew. So you've got this really cool jazz thing mixed with prog rock and nice crunchy bits all coming from guys that you would never expect would make music like this. Highly recommended.

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • Deluxe reissue of the long out of print solo album from Gong's founder. After leaving Gong in 1976, Good Morning was recorded in Mallorca with the Spanish folk band Euterpe. It has a shimmering cosmic veener that only Allen could provide. This was briefly available on CD in the early 90s and then went was deleted by Virgin Records. It is available again with one bonus track and 24 bit remastering. Nice liner notes from Mark Powell.
    $17.00
  • Fireballet's much maligned second album Two, Too finally receives an authorized release.  Much of the criticism of the 1976 album stems from the awful cover art.  Its definitely something those guys wish they could take back and in a sense they did since they used something different for this CD.  All the prog rock elements of the first album are still in place but the tunes are a little bit shorter and the production is definitely slicker.  Its also clear that Yes became a big influence on the band - check out "It's About Time".  Frankly if you listen to the album objectively it has a lot of merits.  Does it stand up to their first?  No...but it definitely offers something solid for prog fans with open ears.  Definitely worth revisiting.  Comes with one previously unreleased bonus track.
    $14.00
  • "The first Mahavishnu Orchestra's original very slim catalog was padded out somewhat by this live album (recorded in New York's Central Park) on which the five jazz/rock virtuosos can be heard stretching out at greater length than in the studio. There are only three selections on the disc, all of which were to have been on the group's then-unissued third album -- two of them, guitarist John McLaughlin's "Trilogy: Sunlit Path/La Merede la Mer" and keyboardist Jan Hammer's "Sister Andrea," are proportioned roughly as they were in their studio renditions, while the third, McLaughlin's "Dream," is stretched to nearly double its 11-minute studio length. Each develops organically through a number of sections, and there are fewer lockstep unison passages than on the earlier recordings. McLaughlin is as flashy and noisy as ever on double-necked electric guitar, and Hammer and violinist Jerry Goodman are a match for him in the speed department, with drummer Billy Cobham displaying a compelling, raw power and dexterity to his work as well, especially on the CD edition, which also gives bassist Rich Laird a showcase for his slightly subtler work. Yet for all of the superb playing, one really doesn't hear much music on this album; electricity and competitive empathy are clearly not enough, particularly on the 21-minute "Dream," which left a lot of fans feeling let down at the end of its side-two-filling run on the LP. In the decades since this album was released, the studio versions of these three pieces, along with other tracks being worked up for their third album, have appeared as The Lost Trident Sessions -- dating from May and June of 1973 -- thus giving fans a means of comparing this repertory to what the band had worked out (or not worked out) in the studio; and Between Nothingness and Eternity has come up a bit in estimation as a result, benefiting as it does from the spontaneity and energy of a live performance, though even that can only carry this work so far -- beyond the personality conflicts that broke up the band, they seem to have been approaching, though not quite reaching, a musical dead end as well." - Allmusic
    $5.00
  • Fates Warning guitarist goes new age with the help of Michael Mannring, Mark Zonder, and Charles Bisharat.
    $13.00
  • "The debut recording from the Dixie Dregs (The Great Spectacular is considered a demo) stands as one fusion's high-water marks. This music is wholly original and played with a freshness and vigor that had begun to wane in a genre that was becoming a model in self-parody. The influences here are plentiful, but it is the country roots that provide the music with its vitality. Founder/guitarist Steve Morse proved to be an important new guitarist, offering an inimitable style with the technique the music demands. The music is complex and challenging, but that's easy to overlook due to the band's sunny approach. While they would go on to create more fully realized recordings, this one proved that fusion had a soul." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Budget price nice slipcased 2CD set includes "Song Of The Marching Children" and "Atlantis".Song Of The Marching Children:Man when they talk about "Mellotron drenched" albums they mean this one. The band's second album is loaded with great organ/'tron passages and Ms. Kaagman sounds more and more like Annie Haslam. The album is capped off with the side long title track.Atlantis:Led by vocalist Jerny Kaagman, Earth And Fire had some success in Europe and eventually became quite popular in Netherlands. Synthesizers are in use now so its not just organ and 'tron although they figure prominently.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"12265","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"200","width":"200"}}]][[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"12266","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"200","width":"200"}}]] 
    $14.00
  • Blow out price. Italian band sounds a bit like early Tull due to the interplay between guitar and flute.
    $14.00
  • Portuguese band led by multi-instrumentalist Luis Simoes augmented by a number of guests including Daevid Allen and Nik Turner. Deep psychedelic space rock definitely has the early Floyd sound going on as well as Pulsar. Flute, Hammond organ, assorted string instruments and percussion weave in and out of the mix accompanied by vocals with tripped out lyrics. The only things missing are the lava lamp and water pipe. The rest is up to you. Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Nicely done remaster of the classic first solo album. If all you are familiar with is the old domestic vinyl pressing, this CD will come as quite a revelation. I remember how much improved the UK vinyl sounded back in the day. This was Gabriel's first solo album and you can tell that he was trying to find his own voice (no pun intended) while distancing himself from Genesis. He worked with a great lineup featuring Dick Wagner and Steve Hunter, Robert Fripp, Larry Fast, Tony Levin ao. Bob Ezrin's production was huge sounding - perhaps Gabriel wanted something that sounded very un-Genesis like. He got it. Curiously of all his solo albums this is the one that, musically speaking, sounds the most like Genesis. A deeply personal album, it features powerhouses like "Humdrum", "Down The Dolce Vita", "Here Comes The Flood", and of course "Solsbury Hill". An album that is ingrained in my soul and absolutely essential.
    $12.00
  • "Spirit's debut unveiled a band that seemed determine to out-eclecticize everybody else on the California psychedelic scene, with its melange of rock, jazz, blues, folk-rock, and even a bit of classical and Indian music. Teenaged Randy California immediately established a signature sound with his humming, sustain-heavy tone; middle-aged drummer Ed Cassidy gave the group unusual versatility; and the songs tackled unusual lyrical themes, like "Fresh Garbage" and "Mechanical World." As is often the case in such hybrids, the sum fell somewhat short of the parts; they could play more styles than almost any other group, but couldn't play (or, more crucially, write) as well as the top acts in any given one of those styles. There's some interesting stuff here, nonetheless; "Uncle Jack" shows some solid psych-pop instincts, and it sounds like Led Zeppelin lifted the opening guitar lines of "Taurus" for their own much more famous "Stairway to Heaven."" - All Music GuideRemastered edition with four bonus tracks.
    $5.00
  • "Recorded in November 1973 at the Omega studios in Chicago, Outside the Law is undoubtedly still the definitive Epitaph album. The sound engineer was Dave "Grape" Purple, who won the 1971 Grammy for Best Engineered Recording on Isaac Hayes' Theme from Shaft. The recording of Outside the Law was completed in just 5 days, with very few overdubs, and the final mix was done by Ed Cody at the United Technique studio on Chicago's South Side.So how does a German rock band get to be recorded by studios and engineers who built their reputations on black music - and produce such a brilliant album?In early summer 1972, Epitaph did a mind-blowing rock festival gig at Berlin's Waldbühne stadium. Also present that day was Gary Pollack, head of Billingsgate Records, who stopped Cliff Jackson on the way to the dressing room with the announcement that "in six weeks you guys will be doing a US tour". Knowing that no German rock bands had ever toured or recorded in the USA before, Cliff and the guys were somewhat sceptical about the project. But sure enough, Epitaph landed at Chicago's O'Hare Airport in August 1972 for a successful twenty-day tour.Returning on a cloud of euphoria to the band residence near Visselhovede in northern Germany (plenty of poets, painters, animals, and ladies, but no heating, no bath, and only an outside toilet) work commenced on a new album. The demo was recorded two months later at the Windrose Studio in Hamburg and then sent over to Gary Pollack, who invited the band to come back to Chicago to do the full recording of Outside the Law.While Billingsgate was preparing the release of the album, Epitaph spent their time gigging around the Chicago area.It was around this time that Irving Azoff, then managing Joe Walsh, wanted to take Epitaph under his wing. The band met up with him for two days to try and work out a deal, but the German manager they already had developed some seriously cold feet. Bearing in mind that their manager, Werner Kuhls, did not speak a word of English, it was hard to comprehend just which of Azoff's propositions he was objecting to. The net result was that Epitaph couldn't get out of the contract with Kuhls, and Kuhls was dreaming of hitting the big time. Ordered back to Germany for a Europe-wide tour, it was soon clear that Kuhls was no Azoff. The tour turned out to be fronting for Status Quo, and one festival gig. Azoff went on to represent such artists as The Eagles, Jewel, Van Halen, Neil Diamond, Steely Dan, Guns N' Roses, and Christina Aguilera, to name but a few. Werner Kuhls went on to be a concert promoter and publisher of the German version of Rolling Stone. Now without a manager, Epitaph hoped for success with Billingsgate.When they returned to the US for their third tour in late 1974, it soon became clear that despite excellent sales of the album, Billingsgate was in dire straits and unable to finance a proper promotional tour. Two months of sporadic gigs later, the guys returned to Germany. When Billingsgate was finally declared officially bankrupt, the band was afraid it might get stuck with some of the debt, so officially split up in January 1975. Klaus, Bernie and new drummer Panzer Lehmann played with various German bands, while Cliff headed off in the direction of Kathmandu.Having shaken off the disappointment of the Billingsgate episode, the band members got together once again later that year to lay down some tracks in Dortmund. The tapes were lost. The band continued in various line-ups throughout the eighties, producing a number of albums.Following a suggestion from Rudolf Schenke of the Scorpions, Jim McGillivray and Cliff Jackson got the band together again for the now legendary Live at the Brewery concert in 2000. Sometime later, Cliff was sorting out his cellar, and found the Lost Tapes. Epitaph fans now have the chance a selection of these Lost Tapes which have been added here as bonus tracks. And the twenty-five year wait has been well worthwhile."
    $15.00
  • "Skewered blasts of noisome, Red metal shatters through rough and tumble landscapes of shuddering percussion, ominous, gravelly basslines and wheezing synths. An all-instrumental bulldozer of an album..." – i/eHappy Family first appeared in the early 1990s as part of the explosion of exciting, underground bands that came roaring out of Japan at that time, such as Ruins, Bondage Fruit, Tipographica and Boredoms.An instrumental quartet of keyboards, guitar, bass and drums, they released two albums of over-the-top, metal, King Crimson & Magma influenced avant-progressive rock for Cuneiform Records in 1995 (Happy Family) & 1997 (Toscco) and then fell silent...until now!Reforming with 3 of the 4 members of the group who appeared on Tossco:Kenichi Morimoto - keyboardsTakahiro Izutani - guitarKeiichi Nagasse - drumsand with new bassist Hidemi Ichikawa, 15 years later, they are back with a fantastic new release, Minimal Gods, and just as heavy and intense as they ever were and they still sound like no one else except Happy Family!
    $15.00
  • Fourth album from this iconic German band features a reunion of the original lineup of Manuel Gottsching, Hartmut Enke, and Klaus Schulze. Gottsching's girlfriend Rosi adds some wordless space whispers. The album consists of two side long blissed out trips into deep space. Fantastic stuff. New remastered edition from Manuel Gottsching.
    $16.00
  • "The brain of Aranis is contrabassist Joris Vanvinckenroye (and on then you've got the five girls and her-anus ;o)p))) and outside his writing the huge majority of Aranis material, he also finds time to have his solo project. And when I mean solo project, Basta! I really mean solo: Joris stands alone on that album, alone with his contrabass and nothing else.Hey!!!! Come back!!! Don't run away! It's not boring at all?.As a matter of fact, it's quite fascinating, really. You never thought contrabass could be this fun, really. Well maybe not as fun as Aranis' first two albums, but still quite entertaining, coz it shows how you can exploit the instrument in a dozen of way. Of course there is double tracking and there are overdubs and?. Sometimes you can hear Joàris playing five things on that stand-up bass and it simply is never boring as he goes from almost medieval (with Sonan and the two dronal Folky Tunes) to almost free-jazz (with Delayed) and all the way to the grandiose SRP and Sleeping Dogs tracks and the Flamenco-flavoured Cycles. And the final eponymous Basta tune is probably the album's peak.Well, Joris' album is surprising, not conceited (unlike Jaco) and borderline fascinating and personally I prefer this to a former god of the electric bass. While not essential, this is still much worth the detour." - Prog Archives
    $14.00