Keys To The Heart

Recorded much later on in his career (1987). Features Dick Morrissey on saxes. One Way reissue now out of print.

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    $9.00
  • "Every pro electric-bass player and their mothers wore out the grooves of this record when it first came out, trying to cop Clarke's speedy, thundering, slapped-thumb bass licks. Yet ultimately, it was Clarke's rapidly developing compositional skills that made this album so listenable and so much fun for the rest of us, then and now. The title track not only contributed a killer riff to the bass vocabulary; it is a cunningly organized piece of music with a well-defined structure. Moreover, Clarke follows his calling card with two tunes that are even more memorable -- the sauntering ballad "Quiet Afternoon" and an ebullient, Brazilian percussion-laced number with a good string arrangement and a terrific groove, "The Dancer." Clarke also brings out the standup bass for a soulful acoustic dialogue with John McLaughlin on "Desert Song." Evidently enthused by their leader's material, David Sancious (keyboards) and Raymond Gomez (guitars) deliver some of their best solos on records -- and with George Duke on hand on one cut, you hear some preliminary flickerings of Clarke's ventures into the commercial sphere. But at this point in time, Clarke was triumphantly proving that it was possible to be both good and commercial at the same time." - All Music
    $5.00
  • Third album from this excellent Belgian band. The Intrigue Of Perception finds them making the transition from a stoner/space band to a progressive rock outfit. While later albums are a touch more refined, this album still has that raw energy from their stoner rock days. The addition of sax player Steven Marx reminds of Mel Collins in "Islands"-period King Crimson. More than enough Mellotron for those (like myself) that can never have enough. Highly recommended.
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  • Intense improvised session from Alex Machacek (guitars), Jeff Sipe (drums), and Matthew Garrison (bass). Easily the best thing Alex has done since Featuring Ourselves. There is more than enough fireworks from each musician to go around. There is a strong similarity to the electric disc of McGill Manring Stevens "Controlled By Radar". Highly recommended. Comes in a nice digipak.
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  • Second album from this great Italian jazz rock band led by Tony Sidney. Recommended to fans of Weather Report.
    $15.00
  • Early prog from Italian keyboard master Enrico Olivieri. First album is only a foreshadowing of Inferno.
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  • Second solo album from the legendary RTF bassist, originally released in 1974. Its a burning set featuring Jan Hammer and Tony Williams. Oh yeah...a guy name Bill Connors is playing guitar and going off his nut.
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  • "Over a nearly 35 year-long career, Miriodor have continuously produced music that is intricate, melodic,challenging and filled with both humor and fire. Their albums are captivating new-music gems filled with great musicians, terrific tunes and a distinctive and personal sound.Miriodor have performed in front of thousands of listeners at major music festivals in North America and Europe.Cobra Fakir is the group's eighth studio album."
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    $15.00
  • Essential jazz fusion effort from Herbie Hancock's post-Miles Davis ensemble. Comes in a nice digipak. Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • This album compiles and releases for the very first time all of the studio recordings (as well as two live recordings) made by guitarist and composer Kerry Livgren with the 2nd edition of Kansas, a seven-piece band that immediately preceded the formation of the lineup of the band that the world knows as Kansas. These recordings present a different and fascinating contrast to the music that Kerry would develop and release upon the world with Kansas just a couple of years later. Yet, as composer of all the tracks here, they still have his obvious imprint. In fact, two of the songs here would later reappear in different versions on Kansas' albums; Belexes would show up on the band's self-titled debut album, while Incomudro would appear on their 2nd album, Song For America. With dual keyboards (one of whom doubled on reeds) and an electric saxist/flautist featured in addition to the more standard rock instrumentation, the sound is obviously influenced by jazz/rock pioneers such as Don Ellis, Soft Machine and Frank Zappa and The Mothers Of Invention as well as early progressive rock bands such as Van Der Graaf Generator and King Crimson. Early Recordings From Kansas 1971-73 is an exciting archival release of dark and exploratory early American progressive rock. The fact that these musicians were not able to find success while making this adventurous music in the heartland of agricultural America over 30 years ago should not be a surprise, but the fact that the tapes have survived and are able to finally be presented to the world in an authorized form will give fans of Kansas as well as all fans of early progressive rock a very pleasant surprise. These recordings have been licensed from, and released with the full consent and agreement of all the musicians. Kerry Livgren has returned to the original tapes and worked on all tracks in his studio to present this material in the best possible light. He also contributed liner notes and provided archival photographs.
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  • This one is a great deal. Small slipcase edition of the five remastered Soft Machine albums: Third through Seven. Albums are in simple jackets with cover art (there is a link to a website with full album credits). Comes out to 5 bucks a disc - can't beat that!
    $22.00
  • This Swedish doomsters does an uncanny job of channeling 70s dark hard rock sounds.  Black Sabbath comes to mind instantly and you'll hear some similarities to bands like Pentagram and Candlemass.  This time around they have opened up their sound a bit - I distinctly hear more than a little bit of Zep inscribed in their genome.  Highly recommended.
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