Kaipa (Remaster)

SKU: 80552
Label:
Tempus Fugit
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Kaipa's first two albums were probably the pinnacle of 70s symphonic rock in Sweden.  The band featured a very young Roine Stolt on guitar.  The band also featured keyboardist Hans Lundin who also handled vocals (in Swedish so be forewarned).  Lundin resurrected Kaipa and they are still going now.

The first album from 1975, features a sound that is very much an amalgam of popular British bands like Yes and Genesis.  Hell - toss in a touch of Camel if you like.  Lundin's upper range vocals will remind you a bit of Jon Anderson in places but he never goes for the stratosphere.  On the other hand his keyboard work features a fair amount of Mellotron - never a bad thing.

This 2015 remastered edition comes with two bonus tracks.

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