Inget Nytt Under Solen (Remaster)

Kaipa's second album didn't present anything radically different from the first album and that's a good thing.  Its simply beautiful symphonic rock in the tradition of Yes and Genesis.  The only negative is that keyboardist Hans Lundin sings in Swedish but his voice is strong so its not unpleasant.  I'm not quite sure why Decca didn't force them to sing in English. 

This 2015 remastered edition arrives with four bonus tracks.

""Inget Nytt Under Solen" was KAIPA's 2nd release and is another wonderful release which must be heard. "Inget Nytt Under Solen" has all the elements you would want in a progressive rock band... beautiful captivating songs with superb musicianship. Ronie Stolt's (FLOWER KINGS) impregnates this album with his accurate and lively guitar work, Tomas Eriksson handles most of the vocals and adds some real solid punchy bass lines, Hans Lundin brings his analog keyboard wizardry while Ingemar Bergman delivers some solid percussion throughout. All the songs as very well constructed and are given lots of space the breathe and create some lovely atmospheres. This album opens with an epic 21 minute suite "Skenet Bedrar" which is simply brilliant (must be heard!!!). Vocals are in Swedish except for the bonus numbers which introduce the world to English lyrics in an attempt to attract the world to KAIPA's talents. Overall I love KAIPA's music and "Inget Nytt Under Solen" is a solid offering which fans of FLOWER KINGS, ANYONE'S DAUGHTER etc. will love and treasure..." - ProgArchives

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • Over the past two decades the Dutch have pretty much cornered the market for female fronted gothic metal.  The Gathering pretty much kicked it off, followed by Within Temptation, After Forever, Epica, and Delain with countless others filling in the gaps - some good and some very much derivative.  Kowai is a new Dutch band that has a sound that harkens back to the beginnings of the scene.  The band is fronted by Laura van Nes who has wonderful voice that is very much reminiscent of Sharon Den Adel.  The band occasionally uses the "beauty and the beast" format - Ms. van Nes' voice juxaposed against the harsh growls of guitarist Bertran Zwijnenburg but that doesn't crop up too often.  The music is filled with melancholy and borders on slow moving doom at times.  After Forever's Joost van den Broek and Stream Of Passion's Jeffrey Revet are responsible for the production.  Given their background they come up wtih the requisite sound - atmospheric and epic.  So here's a band that attempts to reinvent the wheel and they do a damn fine job as well.  This is a still a popular and potentially overcrowded scene.  Musically speaking Kowai has what it takes.  Hopefully they will get the attention they deserve.  Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • Kaipa's first two albums were probably the pinnacle of 70s symphonic rock in Sweden.  The band featured a very young Roine Stolt on guitar.  The band also featured keyboardist Hans Lundin who also handled vocals (in Swedish so be forewarned).  Lundin resurrected Kaipa and they are still going now.The first album from 1975, features a sound that is very much an amalgam of popular British bands like Yes and Genesis.  Hell - toss in a touch of Camel if you like.  Lundin's upper range vocals will remind you a bit of Jon Anderson in places but he never goes for the stratosphere.  On the other hand his keyboard work features a fair amount of Mellotron - never a bad thing.This 2015 remastered edition comes with two bonus tracks.
    $12.00
  • Latest studio album from this highly prolific symphonic rock band from Mexico. The band has developed their sound over the years - all for the better. They now feature Spanish vocals (in general the vocals are much much better than the old days). Flute and keys play an important part of the sound. Make no mistake, this is old school prog all the way. There is a bit of Mexican folk flavor that creeps in now and again but all that does is add some additional personality. Easily the band's best work.
    $14.00
  • Excellent debut release from this progressive folk band from Italy.  The band is led by multi-instrumentalist Valerio Smaldoni who sings (in English) and plays keyboards and some guitar.  The music has a definite prog flavor particularly from the keyboard work - some nice atmospheric Mellotron-type sounds as well as Mini-moog soloing.  Guitarwork is acoustic based that never gets overly agressive.  I'm reminded of Celeste and W&W period Genesis.  This is the kind of thing I can listen to as a Sunday morning wake up call.  
    $18.00
  • "The tangled history of Imaginos, Blue Oyster Cult's last (1988) album for Columbia, has passed into legend for BOC fans. The name and concept comes from late-'60s sci-fi/fantasy writings by band manager/producer Sandy Pearlman that inspired the original band name; they then became the basis for a planned trilogy of solo albums by BOC drummer/songwriter Albert Bouchard, who had been working on the material since the early '70s with Pearlman. After Bouchard was fired from the band in 1981, he recorded a 90-minute album with such sidemen as Aldo Nova and the Doors' Robbie Krieger, but this version of the album was rejected by Columbia execs in 1984. After the release and commercial disappointment of BOC's Club Ninja, Pearlman then resurrected the idea and began production in 1986, adding vocals by BOC's Buck Dharma and Eric Bloom and guitar parts by Joe Satriani among many others. The result was no surprise BOC's most controversial album (and ironically, the first in years to feature the original line-up), probably their heaviest and most proggy outing, and an appropriately complex swan song for a complex band. Our Real Gone reissue features a new 2012 remaster and new notes by BOC expert Scott Schinder, along with the original album and inner sleeve art."
    $13.00
  • Here is what Century Media has to say about it:"Once again Nevermore invite you into their world of desolate metal. On their sixth release, Nevermore blend elements of speed, power, progressive and even death metal to make for a unique listen. With the addition of Steve Smyth to the ranks, this band is prepared to deliver an impending wave of doom over the land. Comes with enhanced features for your computer.
    $8.00
  • Volto is a new (but long gestating) project from Tool drummer Danny Carey and Pigmy Love Circus guitarist John Ziegler.  The quartet is rounded out by noted keyboardist Jeff Babko and session bassist Lance Morrison.  The quartet have been together for some time playing cover tunes.  They finally decided to cut some original music.  To that end they recorded all analogue and had the album mastered by Bob Ludwig.  Expect great sound.This is a blazing all instrumental effort that fits squarely in the fusion genre but with strong overtones of progressive rock...and maybe just a touch of metal.  Chops from hell are the order of the day but this is highly melodic and never seems to suffer from "toomanynotes" syndrome.  At times Ziegler turns up the crunch factor to good effect and Babko lays down some wonderful solos.  Carey is Carey...awesome!!  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • Fifth studio album from this always interesting Polish prog band.  Lizard's music always has a dark quality to it.  At times there is a noir quality that reminds of King Crimson but there is a strong symphonic rock component that dominates their music.  Master & M is a conceptual album based around Mikhail Bulgakov's "The Master & Margarita" novel.  It consists of five long chapters with some intense instrumental passages.  Vocals are excellent but the problem with Lizard is that band leader Damian Bydlinski sings in Polish.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Well Opeth went and did it.  They gave prog rock fans the album they've been waiting for - the one that Heritage alluded to and came close to delivering.  Pale Communion is a full on prog album.  All clean vocals, tons of gorgeous keyboard sounds that will conjure up images of the 70s.  In fact if this album arrived with a Vertigo swirl on it I wouldn't have been surprised.  Some heavy riffing but no real metal elements within earshot.  The album was mixed by Steven Wilson and if anyone knows "the sound" its him.  By the way the album was recorded at Rockfield Studios which is holy ground for prog fans.  Prog rock album of the year?  You bet!  BUY OR DIE!!This is the CD/Blu-ray edition.  It arrives in a digipak and has expanded packaging.  Audio comes to you via a standard CD plus a Blu-Ray.  What's on it you ask?  You get a 5.1 audio mix plus 2 live bonus tracks recorded in Stockholm. 
    $18.00
  • Domestic jewel box edition has the identical contents to the European version."Tim Bowness, one of the most expressive voices in contemporary music returns with the second chapter of his brand new, solo sonic experiments. Released roughly a year after Abandoned Dancehall Dreams, Stupid Things That Mean The World can be seen as a direct follow-up that not only manages to consolidate his strengths, but also takes a step forward towards new territories. I was anxious to hear the results as the man never fails to create something interesting and gripping (at the very least).Although a sequel, STTMTW contrasts its predecessor in both the atmosphere it creates, as well as the emotions it evokes. Since the production is substantially airier this time around, it manages to unfold quicker than ADD, creating shorter, but profound tunes. We get cuts like the title track or 'Where You've Always Been' whose playful, sustained rhythms bring forth quite an unusual, uplifting side of Bowness we rarely get to see. However, this is only a part of a darker record that often feels tensed and frustrated. The characters he portrays have missed several opportunities over the years, feel overwhelmed by life, ugly or devoid of any feelings that once made them feel alive. The most representative numbers are 'The Great Electric Teenage Dream' and 'Press Reset'. There's anger in the powerful guitars and regret in the nostalgic piano lines, whereas the cold, industrial touch present especially on the latter, magnifies this uneasy vibe. Tim also delivers his parts with a poignant tone, boosting the tracks with some of his heaviest hitting moments.On the other side of the spectrum, we have two of the most gorgeous, subdued tracks on the album, 'Sing To Me' and 'Know That You Were Loved' lying in between the aforementioned rockers. They are a lot more comfortable for older fans as each shares similarities with previous helmed projects. 'Sing To Me' stemmed from a 20-year old No-Man demo, entitled 'Best Boy Electric', recorded somewhere in the middle of Wild Opera's recording sessions. Tim reworked it and created a lovely ballad with eerie guitar leads, warm bass and echoed piano lines. Sound-wise, it reminisces 'Smiler at 50' from ADD. 'Know That You Were Loved' is a mostly acoustic affair that brings to mind the low-key No-Man album, Together We're Stranger. Occasional lap steel touches and guitar solos embellish the stripped foundation, yet his voice is once more the focal point.There is a dark appeal to Stupid Things That Mean The World that some might or might not be fond of. Abandoned Dancehall Dreams was a melancholic yet grandiose affair that was easier to wrap your head around. This time, the often bare bones instrumentals push Tim's vocal melodies in front, usually focusing more on the lyrical content than the music itself. Moreover, helped by some elite members of the British nu-prog/art rock wave such as Bruce Soord of Pineapple Thief (who also produced the album), Colin Edwin of Porcupine Tree, long time collaborators Stephen Bennet, Phil Manzanera and Pat Mastelotto of King Crimson, Michael Bearpark or the classical composer Andrew Keeling (among others), Bowness has managed to avoid repetition and create a piece of work that truly complements its prequel. This is a beautiful, cohesive album that stirs so many emotions and speaks for itself. It might not be as immediate or as catchy as ADD, but does the most important thing: paving new grounds." - Sputnik Music
    $15.00
  • New German neoprog band.  Within My Recollection is a 70 minute conceptual work with a load of epic length tracks as the focal point.  This one will appeal to fans of Marillion and Saga but you can easily hear how old school Genesis was an influence on them.  Vocalist needs some work but there are long sweeping instrumental passages that helps you forget.  While keyboards dominate the overall sound the fluid guitar solos have a Rothery feel stamped them.
    $9.00
  • "Esoteric Recordings are pleased to announce their next release in the continuing series of reissues of the entire catalogue by the legendary classical rock band Sky. Unavailable for over 20 years, "MOZART” has been newly re-mastered from the original master tapes and the original album artwork is fully restored. The booklet features a new essay."
    $16.00
  • Reissue of the band's long out of print album from 2001, originally released on Monster Zero.  The band's sound at this point is a bit more primitive and raw in a way - its definitely guitar freak out psychedelia but there is a desert/stoner rock feel.  More overly like Monster Magnet and Kyuss.  The brain blower is the near 20 minute "Elektrohasch" in wich guitarist Stefan Koglek really lets it all hang out.
    $16.00
  • Here's a nice archival discovery courtesy of Esoteric Recordings.  Fields was the post-Rare Bird trio consisting of keyboardist Graham Field, ex-King Crimson drummer Andy McCullough, and bassist Alan Barry.  Their 1971 eponymous release on CBS is a prog rock gem in which Field shows off his abilities as an organ player.Contrasts is a previously unknown to exist second album that sat on a shelf gathering dust since 1972.  It finds Alan Barry replaced by ex-Supertramp Frank Farrell on bass and vocals.  Field concentrates on organ but he does play some synthesizer.  The music has a melodic feel that reminds a little bit of Spring.  Comes with plenty of liner notes by Sid Smith.
    $16.00