I Wash My Soul In The Stream Of Infinity

Second album from the Swedish quartet of Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten), Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama), Ronny Eriksson, and Tomas Eriksson. Like their first album, I Wash My Soul In The Stream Of Infinity is pure psychedelic bliss. The songs have their roots in jam sessions. Overall there is a very German underground/krautrock feel. These long jams vary in tempo - from the buzz saw opener "Fire! Fire!" on through the blissed out Yatha Sidhra-like acoustic "Pagan Moonbeam". Lethal guitar leads augmented by dollops of Mellotron and organ are the order of the day. All served up with phat analogue sound. If its possible to get high from a round aluminum disc this is the one that will do it for you. Highly recommended to those you seek to explore the innermost nooks and crannies of their brain.

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  • Our good friends in Delain have signed a worldwide deal with Napalm Records.  The band is planning a new studio release for early 2014.  In the interim we have Interlude.  Its a CD/DVD collection of unreleased and non-album material.  Some of this dates back to the April Rain line up while other tracks are from the We Are The Others sessions.  The band also kindly included some live tracks from their Female Metal Voices X festival appearance.  Further, there is a (PAL Region 0 format) DVD that includes video footage from the festival, promo videos, and backstage footage.  My extremely biased opinion is that this is a must own.
    $16.00
  • A new Glass Hammer is like a universal constant.  I can always expect exemplary old school prog rock.  For an old timer like myself Glass Hammer is right in my wheelhouse.  This is their 17th studio album (amazing!) .  If you are unfamiliar with the band you should know it revolves around the core of bassist Steve Babb and keyboardist Fred Schendel.  There have been a lot of musicians through the doors of their studio over the years but somehow they always seem to find an endless supply of them.  The line up seems to be fairly stable at the moment.  Salem Hill mainman Carl Groves handles lead vocals along with Susie Bogdanowicz returning as well.  Guitars are handled by Kamran Alan Shikoh and drums by Aaron Raulston.Glass Hammer music is a reverential amalgam of Yes, ELP, Kansas and what the hell throw in a little bit of Genesis.  Steve and Fred proudly wear their influences on their sleeves.  Want wicked keyboard pyrotechnics?  Fred brings the thunder.  In fact they all do.  The Breaking Of The World arrives with epic length tracks and audiophile quality sound.  I wouldn't want it any other way.  BUY OR DIE!
    $12.00
  • "By the late-80’s, thrash became refined, advanced and varied, subgenres of the subgenre itself appeared, from power thrash to progressive while very few kept the original essence of the early days in their music. Even the extreme Teutonic acts embraced much more accessible sounds, moving away from their initial schemes because they had to evolve inevitably to prevail among the rest. During those times of diversity for thrash, Evildead put out their debut, which combined melody and violence in almost equal percentages. The enormous pile of generic groups demanded making a difference from the rest and these guys did it in their own way, although the uncertainty of those days eventually condemned them to languish in obscurity.The album features pretty direct thrash tunes of total aggression, “Unauthorized Exploitation” and “F.C.I./The Awakening” in particular are plenty of power and speed, with that rapid tempo and those sharp riffs attacking so intense. However, they’re not the topical raging thrash intended to be only heavy and rough because Evildead’s performance and song-writing preceding process show some sophistication and grace. The music is violent but at the same time slightly melodic on some sequences, immaculately played and exact, proving the experience and skills of veteran Juan García and Albert Gonzales specially, whose lines lead and determined the tunes. Some of those rabid riffs are quite intricate, not excessively difficult but they make a difference from other band’s lack of precision and exhausting palm mute riffing. So they alternate sonic violence with tenuous technique on those, while “Living Good” and the title-track increase the complexity of structures, introducing distinct riff series, lengthier instrumental passages and much more melody, which becomes a characteristic element of this material. On other hand, it seems the band is trying to not play it that technical and remain accessible and casual, far from the ambitious patterns Juan developed on his Agent Steel years. That resolution becomes evident on “B.O.H.I.C.A.”, the most scruffy chaotic number of the pack, which sounds like uncontrolled hardcore combined with humoristic lyrics. But there’s another exception of opposite nature here: “Holy Trials” is the most progressive composition, tender with some constant acoustic guitar arrangements that make it sound sentimental at times, along with much more meticulous riffs and alternative structures. Apart from those 2, the rest offer no difference: “Parricide” includes a killer intro with both guitarists having a friendly duel of weighty riffing, then it follows the usual band patterns of energetic rhythms and diverse riffs, while “Gone Shooting” puts bigger emphasis on vocals.Those who expected some trace of previous Juan García projects’ sound here will be disappointed, because this was never intended to be a sequel of Agent Steel or Abattoir. The band preferred to make it simpler, straighter without an excessive presence of melody and instrumental complexity. The lack of pretention is clear on some of these numbers, which are focused on the basic characteristics of thrash, making them limited and predictable sometimes. Although Evildead can’t deny their natural predilection for difficulty and melody, both inevitably present during the album, providing their music of excellence and class which most of their peers lacked. Luckily, melody isn’t a tiring element here like it became on post-80’s Artillery and Whiplash, but it’s obvious this material is far from extreme. Phil Flores’ voice contributes tremendously to make this stuff so polite and slightly commercial. His lyrics are incessant and omnipresent, his choruses repetitive and his tone particularly sweet. It’s one of those singers who could’ve sung for a hard rock group instead perfectly, whose presence lacks strength and attitude but manages to fit the nature of these cuts. His words are about entertaining usual issues of pollution, toxic waste and environmental apocalypse, though also combined with mysticism and evil inherited from excessive hours in front of TV watching horror movies. The group name makes it clear and in fact, this mixture of urban thrash identity and horror stuff wasn’t that common, probably just Rigor Mortis introduced some cinema inspiration in their imagery. It’s not only about zombies and witchcraft, expressions like “girl beware of my probing anal tongue dart, I'll kiss your bush, and spread your cheeks apart” on the final composition prove lust and sarcasm are also part of their policy.It’s a very competent record, surprisingly refreshing and aggressive, admirably executed and well-produced. It could’ve got further for sure, maybe the presence of thousands of other common thrash albums around relegated it to discreet success and I’m not talking about selling CDs. In contrast with most of inoffensive subgenre work of that period, Evildead still included velocity, brutality (in small portion) and some obscure lyrics in their music, showing some nostalgia for the good old times. Sadly, like what happened with many other promising bands, this enjoyable material came in the wrong time, shortly afterwards thrash was no longer popular." - Metal Archives
    $14.00
  • "This is my favorite album of 2014 so far! I've been a fan of the Swedish solo artist FreddeGredde's proggier compositions since his early YouTube releases, and while his debut album had some great material, there were also many uninteresting tracks that I wouldn't consider prog at all. This has certainly been adjusted with this second album, because what we get is only seven tracks, no fillers, and they are (almost) all very prog, very creative, and just a pleasure to listen to. I can hear similarities with Moon Safari, Frost*, A.C.T, IQ and early Dream Theater, but also classics like Gentle Giant and Genesis, and it all lands in something entirely unique.Songs by song:1. Welcome the Bright Skies A very welcoming opening track for sure! I notice many similarities between FreddeGredde's first album and this second one, and one is the structure and feel of the opening tracks. "Lonely Starlight" on the debut was full-on prog, but was still accessible and had a coherent flow throughout the track, and most of it was in a 13/8 time signature. All the different themes came back together at the end, making a very tight composition. This new opening track has a very similar structure, with a lot of different themes that flow together, mostly in 15/8 this time, and it's all tied together with the majestic "it all comes together" ending. Both albums have very strong openings, and I like them equally but in different ways. My rating: 5 stars2. The Autotelic Self This is the rocker of the album, the most "prog metal" one. But it's still warm and full of synths and layers, separating it from most other modern prog metal, which tends to feel generic and forgettable. But this one is far from that! Clocking in at a little more than 11 minutes, it goes through a wide range of moods and styles, from crazy instrumental sections reminiscent of Images & Words era Dream Theater, to beautiful piano and acoustic guitar breakdowns, to mandolin based "folk" sections. This track has it all, and it all flows extremely well! It might be the highlight track of the album. My rating: 5 stars3. Your Life After two mostly up-beat and intense tracks, this is a welcomed breather. Based on classical guitar and mandolin, it gives a folk/Irish vibe, with almost sing-along qualities, except that there is no repetitive chorus that sticks with you on a first listen. Despite its soft and accessible sound, there's some "prog" to be found here, with 5/4 and 7/4 time signatures and a longer solo section that's alternating between the guitar and the mandolin. The solos are accompanied by an increasingly powerful choir, which creates a pretty powerful climax considering the type of song it is. It's a little odd among the other tracks on the album, but on it's own, it's a pretty little track. My rating: 4 stars4. This Fragile Existence Is the title possibly a reference to "This Falling World" from his previous album? Musically, they have similarities as they both feature large contrasts and breakdowns, and swiftly go through several moods and ideas (maybe more so than usual, even by FreddeGredde's standards). The stand-out features of this track are the complex vocal harmonies, which at times remind me of Queen and other times of Gentle Giant. It's overall a very playful composition, and the adventurous nature of it always manages to make me smile. My rating: 5/5 stars5. The Tower This is the second calmer track of the album, and is more ambient and cinematic than anything he has done before. Starting with only piano and accompanying synth pads, it gives off a cold and wintery vibe, but as the song goes on, it slowly changes back and forth between positive and sad in a very tasteful way. It's prog and it's got the high amount of variation that FreddeGredde is known for, but it's more atmospheric and slower paced. The ending is just extremely beautiful, probably the highlight of the entire album. My rating: 5 stars6. Shining Another shorter song in-between the epics. It's probably the most pop on the album, with a very catchy chorus that you can sing along to even on the first listen. It's got some prog moments though, some interesting time signature changes, and a cute mandolin based bridge. A solid track, but one more for a casual audience rather than the hardcore prog fans. My rating: 3-4 stars7. Ocean Mind And finally, the 18 minute epic. This one is difficult to process, because there is so much going on, and though I love a majority of it, there are some sections that don't grab me entirely. The instrumental sections are the highlights for me, as they are VERY adventurous and crazy, going from jazzy sections to metal to I-can't-even-describe-it. Again, I think the closest resemblance is early Dream Theater. My rating: 4 starsAll in all, definitely warmly recommended to fans of prog!" - ProgArchives
    $14.00
  • "Kalevala's debut album People No Names, from 1972, is not only one of the rarest but also one of the most remarkable Finnish Progressive Rock albums. This official reissue presents the album in its original gatefold jacket and adds unseen photos, a poster and a new interview with vocalist Harri Saksala into the package. Mastered for vinyl from the original masters by Orgone Studios.""Kalevala was founded in 1969 by bassist Juha 'Lido' Salonen. The band's early line-up sported such would-be icons of no-nonsense Finnish rock as guitarist Albert Jarvinen and drummer Remu Aaltonen, and that's pretty much what their early material was, straight-ahead and aggressive guitar rock. Some of the songs on People No Names are closer to psychedelic than progressive rock in that they are still essentially grounded in the blues scale, especially during the vocal sections, but feature some compositional sophistication beyond the scope of ordinary rock music and long guitar solos over repetitive instrumental vamps."
    $27.00
  • THIS NORTHERN VIRGINIA BASED BAND is a three-piece at heart, musically rooted in the raw energy and rhythmic interplay of RUSH and KING’S X. Fans of dark, guitar-driven rock bands from ALICE IN CHAINS, DEFTONES to the contemporary metal riffing of LAMB OF GOD and PANTERA, will connect to the heavy core of IRIS DIVINE’s sound. Add to that progressive complexity and moody synths inspired by DREAM THEATER and PORCUPINE TREE, and a liberal dose of memorable hooks and melodies, to understand some elements of IRIS DIVINE’s sound. And yet, the band has a distinct identity, not quite sounding like any of the aforementioned bands, and with an emotional urgency that pulls subtly from alternative and other influences.KARMA SOWN IS A TRIUMPH OF A DEBUT ALBUM, immediate and memorable but revealing layers and depth upon repeated listens."Progressive metal is in a rough period right now. The old guard are either releasing sub-standard albums that only make it more obvious how far they have fallen, or they are drastically uncool with anyone who didn't become a fan when progressive metal was first being created. Progressive today tends to mean djent, a style that has sapped all the life and humanity out of music, turning metal into a math equation of time signatures, and not songs that anyone can actually remember. There was a time when progressive metal remembered the ultimate goal of music; to have listeners enjoy the songs so much they would return to them again and again. Today, progressive metal is mostly the sort of music that could pass for muzak, if you don't turn the volume up too loud.Iris Divine wants to change that. They set out with the mission of writing progressive metal that is intricate and challenging, but still produces the kind of songs that listeners who don't have an advanced degree can love and sing along to. It's a challenge, and it goes against the tide, but it's a desperately needed revolution if progressive metal is going to flourish anytime in the near future.I knew from hearing the pre-release track “A Suicide Aware” that Iris Divide was special, and the full album reinforces the point. “The Everlasting Sea” comes out of the gates with plenty of tricky riffing and unusual rhythms, but they lead into big melodies with strong hooks and vocals. Their progressive playing isn't meant for show, it's a tool used to set a tone that juxtaposes with the more melodic moments. Finding the proper balance between these elements is not easy, and many a band have failed miserably trying to do so, but Iris Divine doesn't. On their debut record, they show a skill some bands have spent their entire careers failing to learn.What I love most about the record is that it can be seen in many different lights. If you like straight-ahead metal, there is plenty of heavy riffing and pounding drumming here to keep you satisfied. If you like progressive music, these songs have twists and turns, and Rush-like keyboards, in enough quantity to match the djent crowd. And if you're a fan of old-school radio rock, the choruses in these songs will be music to your ears. Keeping all three of these in mind at the same time can be tricky, but it's worth the effort.For being a trio, “Karma Sown” is a massive sounding record. The production is flawless, big and clear, without ever sounding too polished. The heavy parts are heavy, the vocals are up front, and you would never believe this was a self-produced record that was crowd-funded. I can put it up against many, many of the big label releases, and it would win the fight.In fact, I can think of a dozen so-called progressive metal bands that should immediately hand over their label contracts to Iris Divine, because it's a crime that a band that is advancing progressive metal in the right direction doesn't have the backing of one of the labels. Not to name names, but this album would be bigger than half of the progressive metal released this year if it had the media push behind it.In case you haven't noticed, what I'm saying is that “Karma Sown” is a fantastic debut, and the future of progressive metal. Iris Divine isn't a Dream Theater clone, and they're not djent. What they have done is integrate all the strains of progressive metal into a singular sound, one that could set the standard moving forward. If every band sounded this good, progressive metal wouldn't need to be underground. “Karma Sown” is the best progressive metal album of the year, bar none." - Bloody Good Horror
    $13.00
  • "Evolving from its unique style based on dark Doom and Gothic Metal, AVA INFERI offer a surprisingly catchy work on their fourth album, which delivers their trademark progressive elements in a more subtle manner and leaves ample room for melodies and power. AVA INFERI is the brainchild of legendary Norwegian composer Rune Eriksen (ex-Mayhem) and singer extraordinaire Carmen Simões (MOONSPELL). Their new beautiful dark gem "Onyx" sparkles with Dan Swanö's perfect mix and mastering."
    $12.00
  • Third album originally released in 1981 on a cassette only edition of 79 copies. Emma Myldenberger was a six piece acoustic instrumental ensemble. The music by nature had a folk feel but it was much more intricate. Crack In The Cosmic Egg rightfully compared the band to Between and Third Ear Band. A nice closing chapter to an overlooked band.
    $20.00
  • Tiger Moth Tales is the working name for British multi-instrumentalist Peter Jones.  Mr. Jones has great facility on all instruments and all the more impressive considering he is blind.  He's also a fine vocalist, having had a run on the British X-Factor competition.Cocoon is a conceptual piece based around the four seasons.  The album has a contemporary sound but there are some obvious old school references.  Genesis, Steve Hackett and Anthony Phillips solo work seems to be an influence as is the carnival elements of Haken.  In many ways I'm reminded of Big Big Train - one would think they drank from the same well.  Take something old and create something fresh.  No metal here although some flashes of heavy guitar now and then which work well against the acoustic bits.  Hackett vs. Phillips.  Not sure what it is about the British prog musicians but every once in awhile they create something that has a certain peaceful, tranquil vibe.  I often refer back to that old "Rain" album.  Long on mood and maybe short on chops.  Here we have the mood but Mr. Jones has injected the chops as well.  Highly recommended.
    $10.00
  • "Trans-Siberian Orchestra's second album, Christmas Attic, may not be as focused or serious as Christmas Eve, but it is just as enjoyable and maybe even more consistent, thanks to Paul O'Neill's increasingly impressive compositions and an improved musicality." - Allmusic Guide
    $6.00
  • A Liquid Landscape from The Netherlands is a bit of a departure for The Laser's Edge. Their slice of post-progressive music has a contemporary edge that finds them sitting alongside bands like Dredg, Anathema, and Porcupine Tree. The band has been a live act for several years and shared the stage with bands like Karnivool (AUS), Anathema (UK),Thrice (US) and Riverside (Poland).During the past year the band also was a finalist at the prestigious annual Dutch Grand Prize contest and on top of that they had 3 sold out Noorderzon gigs, featuring a stunning visual show.With all the material they had written, the band reached out to Forrester Savell (Karnivool, Helmet). Forrester liked the material a lot and he agreed on mixing the album and doing some production work as well.‘Nightingale Express’ is a concept album. This inspired moviemaker Lex Vesseur to make a short movie with music from the album. He also made the artwork and the visuals for the live show. So both the music and the film return in an interactive rock show with a live VJ.Washed up, tired and staggering across a beach in the early hours of the morning. Somewhere in the twilight between desperation and surrender, there is still a glimmer of hope. That sense that everything will be alright, no matter what the odds are. This is what A Liquid Landscape sounds like. 
    $8.00
  • AOR/Melodic metal fans will drop dead when they hear this killing album. Cornerstone consists of Royal Hunt's Steen Mogensen and former Rainbow vocalist Dougie White helped out by an array of musicians including RH's mainman Andre Andersen. No surprises here - it really does sound like a cross between Rainbow and Royal Hunt.
    $12.00
  • With their departure from the label, AFM Records has seen fit to release this lavish compilation. The 2 cd set is 130 minutes worth of 24 bit remastered album material, videos, unreleased live and studio material.
    $16.00
  • "Volume 2 of the Bavarian broadcast series present further recordings of Area, for once from the period 1977-1979.Five live tracks from 2 concerts and four tracks recorded in Bavarian Broadcast Corporation owned studio "Franken" "at Nuremberg". Aera played a lively jazz-rock dominated by soloist and sax and flute player Klaus Kreuzeder, based on powerful and clever keyboard playing all held together by amazing bass player Matz Steinke and drummer Lutz Oldemeier (of Missus Beastly-fame) and lots of percussions. Aera were in a very good shape and gave their best. Highlights are the 17 minutes long version of "Draculas Fruhstuck' and nearly 10 minutes version of "You need some speed". All titles were digitally remastered from the original tapes. Booklets contains the history of the recordings and rare photos."
    $16.00