I Wash My Soul In The Stream Of Infinity

Second album from the Swedish quartet of Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten), Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama), Ronny Eriksson, and Tomas Eriksson. Like their first album, I Wash My Soul In The Stream Of Infinity is pure psychedelic bliss. The songs have their roots in jam sessions. Overall there is a very German underground/krautrock feel. These long jams vary in tempo - from the buzz saw opener "Fire! Fire!" on through the blissed out Yatha Sidhra-like acoustic "Pagan Moonbeam". Lethal guitar leads augmented by dollops of Mellotron and organ are the order of the day. All served up with phat analogue sound. If its possible to get high from a round aluminum disc this is the one that will do it for you. Highly recommended to those you seek to explore the innermost nooks and crannies of their brain.

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    $15.00
  • Essential third album from the Mwandishi band. A pure kosmigroov classic in which the ensemble touches on African based rhythms and electric fusion. Hancock and Patrick Gleeson somehow integrate a battery of electric keyboards into the jazz realm but in a way that was organic and seems just about right. A must own.
    $5.00
  • "RUMPLE STILTZKEN COMUNE are from the Italian speaking town of Chiasso in Switzerland right on the Italian border. Just look at the names of the band members and you'll see that these guys are Italian.Vocals are in English though and there's really nothing here to make one think of seventies RPI. This their only album was released in 1977."Flipping" opens with piano then it changes before a minute as drums, vocals, bass and other sounds take over. An instrumental section follows with lots of synths.Vocals are back after 5 1/2 minutes. Piano ends it. "Wrong From The Beginning" has a relaxing beat and sound with vocals.This is my favourite track and this section sounds so good. Organ too in this one. It picks up after 3 minutes with some prominant bass.Vocals are back after 4 1/2 minutes. Organ to the fore 7 minutes in."To Be Or Not To Be" opens with piano then it turns atmospheric. Spoken words before 2 minutes then it kicks in. Not for long though as it settles back with vocals. It sounds great after 5 minutes with the synths then it turns intense before ending with piano. "The Closed Boy" opens with a circus-like melody. Vocals after a minute and the tempo picks up. It settles with acoustic guitar and reserved vocals after 5 minutes.This is almost GENESIS-like. It kicks back in again after 8 minutes. Piano only to end it.A good album but nothing more." - ProgArchives
    $15.00
  • Third and best album from this seminal Italian prog band. Originally Delirium was led by flautist/vocalist Ivano Fossati, who left after the first album and went on to a significant career in Italy as a pop singer (still going strong today). His replacement was Englishman Martin Grice who not only played flute but sax as well. In addition to Grice's great work you get some killer organ and Mellotron. The sax/organ interplay reminds a bit of VDGG and there is an obvious Tull influence at play as well. Nicely remastered and repackaged in a mini-lp sleeve.
    $20.00
  • The final chapter in the Evermore saga has finally arrived. With new vocalist Nils Patrik Johansson on board the band is poised to take their popularity to the next level. Johansson hails from Sweden and was a remarkable discovery. With a strong set of pipes that instantly remind of "Holy Diver"-era Dio, Johansson has been making a bit of noise of late with the bands Astral Doors and Richard Andersson's Space Odyssey. Truth be told....it was his work with Wuthering Heights that got him those gigs and now you will all understand why. Erik Ravn has fine tuned the sound a bit moving slightly away from the progressive sounds of To Travel For Evermore although it's still a solid mix of neoclassical and progressive metal (just a tad less on the prog side this time). There is a definite infusion of folk elements that blends seamlessly. Tommy Hansen once again produced and with the added time the band had in the studio it is by far their best production yet. So what we have here is folk music, neoclassical metal and symphonic rock all blended together to create a unique musical vision that will appeal to fans of Blind Guardian, Symphony X and Yngwie Malmsteen.Oh yeah....we've even tossed in a bonus track not found on any other release in the world.
    $13.00
  • Remastered with 2 bonus tracks."Over the course of their first three late-'70s albums, Foreigner had firmly established themselves (along with Journey and Styx) as one of the top AOR bands of the era. But the band was still looking for that grand slam of a record that would push them to the very top of the heap. Released in 1981, 4 would be that album. In producer Robert John "Mutt" Lange -- fresh off his massive success with AC/DC's Back in Black -- guitarist and all-around mastermind Mick Jones found both the catalyst to achieve this and his perfect musical soulmate. Lange's legendary obsessive attention to detail and Jones' highly disciplined guitar heroics (which he never allowed to get in the way of a great song) resulted in a collaboration of unprecedented, sparkling efficiency where not a single note is wasted. "Nightlife" is only the first in a series ("Woman in Black," "Don't Let Go," the '50s-tinged "Luanne") of energetic, nearly flawless melodic rockers, and with "Juke Box Hero," the band somehow managed to create both a mainstream hit single and a highly unique-sounding track, alternating heavy metal guitar riffing, chorused vocals, and one of the ultimate "wanna be a rock star" lyrics. As for the mandatory power ballad, the band also reached unparalleled heights with "Waiting for a Girl Like You." One of the decade's most successful cross-genre tearjerkers, it has since become a staple of soft rock radio and completely eclipsed the album's other very lovely ballad, "Girl on the Moon," in the process. And last but not least, the surprisingly funky "Urgent" proved to be one of the band's most memorable and uncharacteristic smash hits, thanks to Junior Walker's signature saxophone solo. Through it all, vocalist Lou Gramm does his part, delivering a dazzling performance that confirmed his status as one of the finest voices of his generation. Three years later, Foreigner would achieve even greater success on a pop level with the uneven Agent Provocateur, but by then Jones and Gramm were locked in an escalating war of egos that would soon lead to the band's demise. All things considered, 4 remains Foreigner's career peak." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • "Esoteric Recordings are pleased to announce the release of the first ever boxed set celebrating the solo work of Genesis founding member Tony Banks. A CHORD TOO FAR is a deluxe 4 CD set comprising 48 songs and pieces, all personally selected by Tony. Many tracks have been remixed exclusively for this collection and have been drawn from his seven solo and two orchestral albums; A CURIOUS FEELING, THE FUGITIVE, THE WICKED LADY (film score), SOUNDTRACKS , BANKSTATEMENT, STILL, STRICTLY INC. and his orchestral albums SEVEN – A SUITE FOR ORCHESTRA and SIX PIECES FOR ORCHESTRA.A CHORD TOO FAR also includes four previously unreleased tracks, three of which are keyboard demos of his orchestral suites. The fourth is a piece originally written for the album STILL. Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2010 as a member of Genesis, Tony is one of the most respected songwriters and keyboardists in the world. His career spans almost 50 years and has seen him sell in excess of 130 million albums . His body of work is as innovative as it is eclectic. Genesis’ avant-garde style made them one of progressive rock’s founding fathers in the 1970s, creating an experimental style of rock music never before seen. They went on to produce music with a greater pop sensibility in the 1980s that saw them become one of the biggest selling bands of the decade, and play stadiums throughout the world.Tony Banks’ solo work has continued in the same vein. His rock albums have included collaborations with some of the world’s most respected musicians including singers Toyah Wilcox, Fish and Nick Kershaw , bassist Pino Pallodino , and drummers Steve Gadd and Vinnie Colaiuta , as well as long time Genesis collaborators Daryl Stuermer and Chester Thompson . He has composed original scores for four films The Shout (1978), The Wicked Lady (1983), Starship (1985) and Quicksilver (1986) and most recently his orchestral albums, Seven: A Suite for Orchestra and Six Pieces for Orchestra, that were performed by the London Philharmonic Orchestra and City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra."
    $55.00
  • The second DVD from this great Welsh progressive rock band. Pro-shot in front of their home audience, Live At The Point features a completely different set from the band's first DVD The Gathering. It also features a much more enjoyable viewing experience as it doesn't feature the constant jump cuts that was on the first DVD. It was filmed in 2007 - before Metamorphosis was recorded so the material draws on the back catalog.
    $18.00
  • YEEEEOOOOOWWW!!!! After a bout of silence Octafish return with their third album of "industrial fake jazz". Folks this one is a real barnburner. Squalling sax, shredding guitars, liquid synth leads, and a rhythm section from hell - coat it all with a Zappified outer shell and you've got one lethal musical bullet. The original tune "thxfz" would certainly make Frank smile and Gail grimace. CAN SOMEONE PLEASE BOOK THIS BAND FOR A US FESTIVAL? Highest recommendation - all killer no filler.
    $13.00
  • After their last performance at Nearfest Apocalypse, Anglagard's lineup went through a bit of an upheaval.  Luckily it didn't materially affect the band's sound.  Anglagard is still Anglagard.  Prog Pa Svenska is a 2CD set that documents the band's three day residence at Club Citta in Tokyo, Japan back in March 2013.  Material is drawn from all three studio albums.  The recording is beautiful and the performances are stellar.  What else do you need to know?  How about this review:"May 14th of this year will see the release of a new Änglagård live album: Prog på Svenska—Live in Japan. Some of you may have been lucky enough to have been following Änglagård from the very beginning, but if you’re anything like me, you came into the game when Änglagård’s small catalog of music was either out of print or near impossible to find without spending a fortune; that is, with the exception of one little disc which somehow was available when snagging a copy of albums like Epilogue seemed to be a Herculean feat. That album was Buried Alive, the live recording of Änglagård’s last show prior to their 1994 breakup. While the liner-notes of Buried Alive reveal a band that was not 100% satisfied, 20 years later with the release of Prog på Svenska—Live in Japan, Änglagård is back and going strong with a new live recording that is rich in dynamic and deep in maturity, a performance that I am confident that they are proud to immortalize for their fans.Prog på Svenska represents the first of three consecutive nights that the masters of dark Swedish prog delivered at Club Città in Japan alongside The Crimson ProjeKCt (featuring the legendary Adrian Belew and Tony Levin). For me personally this is a special album that transports me back to when I witnessed their unbelievable performance only three weeks later at Baja Prog. Among a plethora of canonized acts at the festival (such as Hackett, New Trolls, and Three Friends), Änglagård’s remarkable performance showed that they stand in no one’s shadow. While there’s nothing like being there in person, Prog på Svenska is about as good a live recording and performance as I’ve ever heard on disc. I certainly am jealous of the Japanese fans who got to see them three nights in a row last year.The live-set on this album shows a balanced representation of the old and the new, featuring two tracks from each studio release along with an unreleased intro track which I assume (and hope) will be on Änglagård’s next studio production. So that the anticipation doesn’t kill anyone, I’ll start right off with the new song: ”Introvertus Fugu Part 1.” Perhaps the first thing to know about this track is that it’s our first look into the composition of the new band featuring Linus Kåse and Erik Hammarström alongside Anna, Johan, and Tord. I can happily say that “Introvertus” shows a band that knows how to move forward without abandoning the distinctive identity that they are known for, a fact that strongly hints at a powerful album to come in the future. The opening moments of the song show the band increasingly incorporating elements of modern classical and atonal music through the delicately dark chord changes on the piano before constructing a wave of tension with ambient bass noise, a distinctive guitar motif,  and a descending melody on flute playing against tuned percussion. As the ambient textures continue to swell, a big percussive crash shockingly interjects, setting the stage for an ominous swelling of Mellotron chords, resulting in an eerily delightful sound. The intensity continues to build with a drum roll on snare and cymbals that transition the piece into an aggressive angular instrumental attack featuring howling Minimoog modulation; enter a fiercely dark melody which is doubled or harmonized on most instruments before the band takes the listener into their signature dose of woodsy folkiness. Johan and Linus continue pounding in the rhythm section before the eerie central motif returns to bring “Introvertus” towards its close with the full force of Anna and Linus’ dueling woodwinds, one hanging on the melody while the other produces chaotic squeals before withering off the melody in a very unsettling (but cool) way.After kicking it off with an exciting intro the band takes us back 20 years with “Hostsejd.” The rich dynamics, especially the meticulously controlled Mellotron swells, really shine on this one while some small differences in instrumentation (such as the sax on the first main melody instead of flute) really keep the piece fresh and exciting. Although I was craving the intro on the follow up track, “Längtans Klocka,” the supreme level of interplay between all instruments that starts off the piece is fantastic. Furthermore, the guitar/Mellotron duet at about 6:30 that leads into a memorable theme is quite the highlight. Finally, the circus-y melody towards the end of the song somehow becomes even more diabolic in this slightly stripped down version as Tord’s demented waltzy riff serves as a perfect backdrop for the drunken saxes. Speaking of Tord, it certainly is nice to see him back in the band, and I must add that his guitar playing and sense of emotion is perfect for the band and has improved over the years. This is perhaps most clearly demonstrated on “Jordrök,” a quintessential song in Änglagård’s catalog. The reality of the matter is that despite the fact that the band was quite mature at the time of Hybris‘ release, their capacity to bring out all the nuances in pieces like this shows that they are musicians who have truly refined their craft over the years. “Jordrök” sounds more alive than ever; the Mellotron flute section in the middle, one of the band’s absolute trademark melodies, is to die for, and Linus’ superb use of phrasing and pacing in the piano intro certainly takes this classic piece up several notches.Moving deeper into the performance we see “Sorgmantel,” one of my personal favorites from Viljans Öga. The first thing I noticed about this particular performance is that the intro sounds much more raw due to differences in instrumentation, this version starting out with a guitar and bass call and response. While I absolutely adore the studio version, this new arrangement and performance was also wonderful and brought its own set of advantages to the table. First, the bass/guitar duet at the beginning really exposes the melody and shows you that its not just about fancy instrumentation, it’s a gorgeous melody through and through. Second, the band is not concerned in the least bit with rushing through the performance of this piece; the pacing is delicate, precise, and emotional with plenty of space for ritard and sway as the intro melody gets passed around from guitar to bass and flute and is then countered by the piano, making the fugue-nature of this piece even more evident. The playing is incredibly tight but busting with dynamic throughout as “Sorgmantel” takes its many twists and turns before working its way to a quiet ending; graceful… even breathtaking.To wrap up the night, Änglagård once again goes back to the early 90′s, this time with “Kung Bore” and “Sista Somrar.” Although the former leans more on the folky side of the band, as does much of their first album, the highlight of the piece actually ended up being the mysterious and ambient middle section where the band shows that they have mastered perhaps one of the most difficult aspects of music: playing quietly with vibrant emotion. Between the light swells of guitar, weird effects on bass, a steady organ pattern in the upper register, and a lightly beating drum, this section goes beyond merely doing justice to the original. Finally, the depth and emotion of “Sista Somrar’s” slow, dark intro is, quite frankly, deadly, and goes miles deeper than the original studio recording (which was in and of itself very impressive) as an ominous sax melody flanked by stormy percussion and effects guides us to the unleashing of an uncanny tron female solo voice that will haunt your nightmares for weeks to come.In my opinion, Prog på Svenska—Live in Japan is an essential live album that you don’t want to miss out on. Quite honestly, I am a person who rarely enjoys live albums because oftentimes the performances and production are either significantly worse than the studio recording, or the live version ends up being stripped down to the point where there’s just something missing, or the band simply doesn’t offer an experience which is significant enough to enjoy the live version deeply; in most cases you sort of ‘had to have been there’ to get what’s so great about it. Such is not the case with Änglagård’s latest live documentation. From the performances to the production and the differences in detail from the originals, Prog på Svenska is a stellar capturing of live art through and through. And of course, I might add that if you ever get the chance to see Änglagård perform, take the opportunity; if your significant other isn’t a prog fan, take them anyways. Änglagård’s extreme level of delicacy in phrasing and dynamic is a tough match to beat in progressive music and should hold up even in the face of the snootiest of music connoisseurs." - Progulator
    $25.00
  • Deluxe digipak version comes with a bonus NTSC DVD featuring "The Making Of Trust".
    $15.00
  • "New live album from Swedish prog rock sensation Moon Safari. Recorded at the band's performance at the classic Baja Prog festival in Mexicali, Mexico. The album features some of their classic tunes as well as pieces from their latest studio release Himlabacken Vol. 1. Drumming on this release is Mikael Israelsson from Swedish prog rock band Black Bonzo. Recommended for all fans on melodic prog rock."
    $16.00
  • Remastered edition finally taken from the original master tapes and transferred utilizing 24 bit / 96 khz technology.
    $10.00
  • "Hard to believe it has been four years since the last Iron Savior record. In that time I almost thought we'd never hear anything from Piet and co again. Boy am I glad they're back, and with the Condition Red line-up to boot. While I felt Megatropolis was a slight musical misfire, The Landing sees the band firing on all cylinders again.It should be no surprise that this album sounds quite a bit like Condition Red in places, with a hefty kick of Unification and Battering Ram for good measure. This is pure unadulterated German power metal played by one of the granddaddies of the genre, Piet Sielck is the man, and he displays his mastery of this style all over The Landing. Kicking off with a mid-paced cruncher armed with sublime hooks, and a majestic chorus, "The Landing" is a great start to the show. However it is in "Starlight" that the album really kicks off. I was overcome with joy when I first heard this song. Iron Savior at their best: blazing riffs, double kicking, and a massive chorus; this track could have be long lost from the Unification recordings.Throughout The Landing Iron Savior continue to assert their authority; everything from production to performance is nothing short of excellent – which should be expected of these masters. The guitar tone is concrete middle ground between the more compressed tone of Battering Ram and the natural feel of Condition Red. They album ticks all the boxes that need ticking in an Iron Savior record, "March of Doom" nails the heavy power metal track, with badass riffs and the finest pre-chorus of the album. "Heavy Metal Never Dies" takes the "Warrior" approach and is a great fist pumper, and coupled with "R.U. Ready" tick of the worship of heavy metal approach. Finally we have the quality "Before the Pain" which ticks off the ballad.All in all I believe The Landing is a complete and utter success, vastly preferable to the latest releases from stalwarts Gamma Ray and Stormwarrior. Highly recommended to all power metal fans, this is without a doubt one of the finest releases this year. While it doesn't reinvent – or innovate for that matter, that isn't important as Iron Savior were never about that. Recommended." - Metal Crypt
    $15.00