Home (Deluxe Mediabook)

SKU: GAOM026LE
Label:
Gentle Art Of Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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"With 'Home', for the first time since their critically acclaimed 'Posthumous Silence' of 2006, Sylvan have taken the chance to create another full-on concept album. Even though the Hamburg natives attach great importance to creating contextually comprehensive pieces of art with any of their albums, this time around Sylvan have upped their ambition another notch and taken on the mammoth task of building an overall concept around the never ending quest of the human condition for 'home' - that very special place that can provide a feeling of complete safety."

This is the deluxe mediabook edition.  Same track listing as the jewel box but in much nicer packaging.

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  • Mr. Holdsworth split the scene with the guitar role recast by his old replacement John Etheridge. Changing names from "Soft Works" to "Soft Machine Legacy", the band played a brief European tour early in 2005. Mr. Etheridge isn't exactly a slouch in the six-string department and he blends in quite well with Elton Dean, Hugh Hopper, and John Marshall. Although this 51 minute disc only features a portion of their live set there are some nicely played renditions of old chestnuts like "Kings & Queens" as well as newer material.
    $13.00
  • Remastered edition finally taken from the original master tapes and transferred utilizing 24 bit / 96 khz technology.
    $10.00
  • Michael Romeo doesn't work quickly.  The man takes his time and a new Symphony X album is ready when its been honed to perfection.  Underworld is the first new album in four years.  To get to the point its ridiculously great.  Up through V, the band were the modern agents of neoclassical/symphonic metal.  With The Odyssey the band took a left turn with Russell Allen's vocals being more agressive and a pervasive overall crunchiness, heaviness to the sound.  Perhaps a bit less symphonic sounding.  With Underworld fans of the "old style" will smile once again.  The band has found a way to balance both sides of their sound.  Its heavy but extremely melodic.  Russell's vocals are spot on and Mr. Romeo's solos have an organic flow that will sweep you through the tune.  Its a beautiful marriage of styles - not too much of either direction that the band has exhibited in the past.  Toss in a theme built around Dante's Inferno and you've totally sucked me back in to the fold.  BUY OR DIE!"A lot has happened with New Jersey-based progressive metal band SYMPHONY X since the Iconoclast album was released four years ago. Singer ‘Sir’ Russell Allen recorded and toured behind several releases with ADRENALINE MOB, toured with TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA and recorded the album The Great Divide with ALLEN-LANDE. Bassist Mike Lepond toured with HELSTAR and released his excellent solo album under the name SILENT ASSASSINS. Keyboardist Michael Pinnella released a solo album and guitarist Michael Romeo made guest appearances on some albums. Drummer Jason Rullo battled and successfully recovered from heart failure in 2013.Four years later, SYMPHONY X delivers another fantastic album, the band sounding just as powerful as Iconoclast, and amazingly never missing a beat. Titled Underworld, it is sort of a concept album, loosely based on Dante’s epic poem Inferno. Dante’s Inferno is not a totally original topic in the metal world; ICED EARTH featured an epic song based on it on their 1995 album Burnt Offerings and SEPULTURA wrote a concept album based on it with 2006’s Dante XXI, while SYMPHONY X themselves included references to it on their 1997 album The Divine Wings Of Tragedy. Several other metal bands have also been influenced by the poem.SYMPHONY X do not follow the tale word for word, but use it more as an inspiration. Michael Romeo is quoted as saying that the album has a theme of “going to hell and back for something or someone you care about.” He also said that this album is more about “the song” instead of the album as a whole, allowing it to flow better from song to song. This doesn’t mean every song is an attempt at a single. Romeo’s intent when writing songs for Underworld was for people to be able to take in the whole album in one listening. (The total album length is just over an hour, compared to Iconoclast’s two discs that were around 83 minutes).To be honest, the last two SYMPHONY X albums, 2007’s Paradise Lost and 2011’s Iconoclast were my favorite albums released by the band so far. I refer to them as the “angry” SYMPHONY X, mainly due to Russell Allen’s vocal delivery and the aggressive music on those particular albums. So, I waited to see if we would get a third album in this same vein from SYMPHONY X. The songs on Underworld seem to alternate between prog and aggression, but for the most part, the album is not as “angry” as Iconoclast. The album strikes a perfect balance between prog and power. Some songs are aggressive without being “angry”. There are definitely more classic SYMPHONY X elements here than on recent releases.The album is much more accessible than previous albums. The songs overall are shorter (most clocking in at around the 5-6 minute mark), and more to the point than on previous albums. For example, “Kiss Of Fire” is one of the best tracks I’ve ever heard by SYMPHONY X. It immediately became a favorite of mine on this album, with the verse, “Bring down the hammer, with serious anger – It’s me against the world!” section and the chorus becoming some of my favorite moments. This song probably represents the album to me more than any other, but the album is filled with classics, such as opener “Nevermore”, a ferocious track that is aggressive in the verses, while the chorus is more melody-driven. The title track follows, with many twists, turns and speed sections. “Without You” is a standout track. With its guarded delivery by Allen and acoustic guitar flowing in the background, it is probably the mellowest moment on Underworld, but that’s not a bad thing. The chorus is the focus of the track, with Allen performing some of his best work. The song probably has the most potential as a single. Another solid track, “Charon”, named for the ferry boatman of the underworld, follows. This track has a middle-eastern flavor to it.The longest track on the album (9:24 in length) follows, the excellent “To Hell And Back”. This song has so many great parts, it’s hard to pick a particular favorite, possibly Allen’s soaring vocal on the chorus or the “on and on and on / no quarter asked, no quarter given” section. “In My Darkest Hour” follows and is another favorite of mine, featuring speed riffing parts, mixed with a melodic chorus. Allen really shines on this song. “Run With The Devil” is even more up-tempo and another one of the more accessible songs due to the chorus. “Swan Song” finds keyboardist Pinnella taking the bulk of the spotlight with his piano flourishes. The album closes with the excellent “Legend”. Allen’s aggressive pre-chorus vocals and melodic chorus vocals make this an instant classic.I believe the playing on Underworld is at another level for the band. Lepond’s bass work is spectacular throughout and Jason Rullo makes a real statement with his drum performance. Fantastic work from keyboardist Michael Pinnella and of course guitarist Michael Romeo’s amazing riffs and solos are worth the price alone. But you get more, don’t you? You get one of the best singers in metal, Sir Russell Allen, making yet another classic album even better with his voice.The album’s exquisite cover artwork (once again by illustrator Warren Flanagan) features the return of the SYMPHONY X masks, around which are eight symbols that represent the circles of hell: limbo, lust, gluttony, greed, anger, heresy, violence, and fraud. The symbol for treachery, the ninth circle, is underneath the masks, and hopefully will be revealed in full inside the album packaging.Underworld is a great album, which grew on me the more I listened to it. SYMPHONY X are masters of American prog metal, and have been for quite some time. Underworld further cements that reputation, and will undoubtedly please fans of all eras of the band." - KNAC.com 
    $14.00
  • "Italy has a long and ample heavy metal history, notably in the melodic, power, and symphonic metal genres. Here's At The Dawn, from Bologna, returning with their second album Land In Sight, now signed to Bakerteam Records.In that longstanding Italian tradition, At The Dawn brings classic melodic heavy power metal, often with some synth produced symphonic elements. While neither this genre or their music is not novel or extraordinary, it is well-crafted and well-played. And they do this with varied and diverse arrangements. Not every song requires the gallop of power metal, nor the abundance of bombastic synths.But when these classic elements of symphonic power are necessary, ATD delivers as with Tiger Within of The Deserter. Then there's the series of four songs Ouverture, The Offense, The Revenge and The Day When Heroes Day expand on those elements but also add traditional melodic metal to the mix. The first two of the tetralogy are notable for the use of simple piano and vocals. This only demonstrates that the band has a keen sense of melody and understands the need for good vocal harmony. Stefano De Marco has a clean melodic style and strong presence throughout this album.After these things, most every song is loaded with guitar harmony and fiery leads. After all the band was founded by it's lead guitarist, Michele Viaggi. In the best power metal sense, like the synths, his riffage makes the arrangements large and bombastic as well. You can catch this within A Crow With No Wings. His leads are of the classic variety, but so much the neo-classical Malmsteem widdling.Finally, mention should be made of two additional songs. The first is Siren Call which features Letizia Chiozzi of Synful Ira adding female vocals for a quite ambitious melodic vocal arrangement, one of the best here. Another is the cover of Iron Maiden's Revelations, where At The Down bumps up the speed ever so slightly, but also offers some symphonic notes. It sounds pretty good. All in all, At The Dawn's Land In Sight is interesting and entertaining album of melodic and symphonic power metal, which will please most any fan of the same. Recommended." - Dangerdog.com
    $13.00
  • "Death.Taxes.Ozric Tentacles.Since 1984 this loose collective have been releasing reliably great music from the mind of leader Ed Wynne. Their margin of error is enviably tiny – there is no such thing as a bad Ozrics album. Sure, some are better than others, but the body of work is as inescapably consistent as mortality and societal contributions. Technicians of the Sacred is their fifteenth studio album, second double album and the first release in this format since Erpland in 1990. It is also one of the best they have ever recorded.The blend of electronica and inner-space rock is instantly recognisable with ‘The High Pass’. World music and gently undulating synths take their time to ease us back into the required frame of cosmic consciousness. It takes almost 6 minutes for the secret weapon, Wynne’s signature lysergic lead guitar, to be deployed and that is the modus operandi of the whole album – nothing is rushed, each track unfolds lotus-like.‘Changa Masala’ distils all the band’s ingredients into a spicy side-dish. Sequencers, vocal samples and a reggae skank provide the base while acoustic guitar rips like a John McLaughlin solo, interjecting a nod to their past, a musical in-joke for the fans, which I won’t spoil for those who haven’t yet heard it.The Steve Hillage (Gong, System 7 and sometime Ozrics collaborator) influence is foregrounded in the first disc’s closer, ‘Switchback’. Tap-delay guitar slithers over a web of ambient keyboard washes. Portamento bass notes slide and glide their way through the patchouli-scented psychedelic haze.f the first disc was an aromatic treat, then the second is manna. ‘Epiphlioy’ recalls the classic ‘Saucers’. Its serpentine twelve-string acoustic riffs employ Eastern modes to evoke a scene that is paradoxically earthy and otherworldly. Staccato strings conjure Kashmir while a celestial orchestra of whooshing keyboard pads threatens to levitate us into the stratosphere and beyond. We are back in the bizarre bazaar, folks. Brandi Wynne pins down the ethereal mix with a heavy dub bassline. The track changes constantly. This is the most compositionally complex music the band has ever produced.While there are references to Ozric history and a more organic feel similar to early classics with the occasional use of non-electric instruments and ethnic voices, the album as a whole is a step forward. The painstakingly crafted symbiosis of synthesised sounds and rock instrumentation, coupled with a slick production, lend Technicians of the Sacred a holistic integrity not heard since Jurassic Shift (which incidentally entered the UK charts at a very respectable number 11 in 1993). The whole gels together and flows with the multi-layered sophistication of a symphony while retaining some of the jam-band aesthetic of the free festival days.‘Smiling Potion’ features interlocking sequences even Tangerine Dream would be proud of and a tribal metronome-sense beat straight out of Peter Gabriel’s soundtrack for The Last Temptation of Christ.As ‘Rubbing Shoulders With The Absolute’ throbs along on a blissed-out dub rhythm artificially generated voices ensure the weirdness meter is kept firmly in the red.Hungarian drummer Balázs Szende makes his first studio appearance and throughout the album he proves to be a superb addition to the group, whether approximating the tight programmed style of The Hidden Step era or, as on the closing track, ‘Zenlike Creature’, tackling elusive prog time signatures with ease and finesse. As Ed Wynne winds up a solo worthy of fusion maestros Mahavishnu Orchestra he introduces a shimmering Hillage-esque repeating motif that stays in the mind long after the music has stopped.Technicians of the Sacred, for all its dynamic shifts and intricacies, is a very chilled-out release, one for relaxing to and for transportation to the other, wherever that may be. There are no jarring wig-out rock guitar hero sections or all-out sonic attacks like ‘The Throbbe’. Rather this is Ozric Tentacles’ most cohesive and accomplished effort in almost 20 years and a highlight of a long and peerless career." - Echoes And Dust
    $35.00
  • One part Malmsteen - one part Blackmore, Axel Rudi Pell is an institution in Germany. Although he's not all that well known in the States, the guy sells a gazillion CDs with each release in Europe.
    $15.00
  • "Dream Evil's third album, Book of Heavy Metal, is a brazen tribute to this always controversial genre -- as likely to invoke blind devotion from its fans as it does outright dismissal from its antagonists. In fact, Dream Evil, much like loin-clothed metal warriors Manowar, care not for the latter category of sniveling vermin! No sir, their mission to metalify (is that a word?) the realm is fueled by far grander ambitions and deeper commitments than those non-believers could possibly fathom. Or so one would gather from the meaty staccato riffs, dazzling guitar solos and soaring vocals (everything classic metal is known and loved for) to be found in über-metallic offerings such as "Into the Moonlight," "Crusader's Anthem," and the over-the-top title track, which incidentally begins with vocalist Niklas Isfeldt's piercing scream of: "metaaallll!" Noted metal producer Fredrik Nordström is the main architect of Dream Evil's castle -- a castle also embattled by bassist Peter Stalfors and legendary drummer Snowy Shaw (King Diamond, Notre Dame, etc.), but it's Greek guitar-shredding sub-legend Gus G. (Mystic Prophecy, Firewind, etc.) who consistently shines through with his ever-explosive, but surprisingly restrained and well-timed leads here (and on album highlight "No Way" he pulls a few Zakk Wylde tricks, surprisingly enough). Also to their credit, Dream Evil doesn't pave their glorious road with the easy but by now rote clichés of power metal. There's virtually zero thrash-like speed to be found here, and many songs ("The Sledge," "Let's Make Rock" and "The Mirror," in particular) actually come closest to old-school hard rock than later-day metal for inspiration. Throw in the mandatory power ballad (the decidedly syrupy "Unbreakable Chain") and an absolute metal classic in the Accept mold named "M.O.M. (Man or a Mouse)," and you have the ingredients for a damn fine, pure metal album. In short, fans of Judas Priest, Dio, and especially Manowar will likely find themselves lapping up this seriously corny document, and the fact that the members of Dream Evil often have their tongues planted firmly in cheek should also forgive most of their excesses in the name of (deep breath now...) metaaaaallll! [Book of Heavy Metal also features a 60-minute bonus DVD packed with behind-the-scenes footage and the title track's brilliantly over-the-top promo clip.]" - Allmusic
    $14.00
  • Two CD compilation features 2 unreleased unplugged acoustic tracks. Pretty good selection of material. Would make a great addition for any car changer.
    $6.00
  • "The second live DVD release by the outstanding art-rock band from Poland. Believe's music appeals to the lovers of Collage, Satellite, Porcupine Tree or Pink Floyd. This concert was recorded in November 2011 in Wyspianski Theater in Poland. The DVD also includes over 100 minutes of additional video material: 2 bootleg videos, an interview with Mirek Gil and Karol Wr+Ýblewski, and "Music for One Leg" documentary!"
    $18.00
  • "Killing Touch is a new band founded by Italian ace vocalist Michele Luppi, whom you might remember from acts like Vision Divine, Michele Luppi’s Heaven and/or Los Angeles.“One Of A Kind”, the band’s debut, is a concept album based on Stephen King’s novel “The Dead Zone”. It contains 12 tracks, produced by Luppi himself, that can be described as a mix of power and progressive metal, but with enough attention for the melodies to satisfy the fans of (classic) melodic hard rock. I can’t help it, but I have a soft spot for Michele Luppi. He hasn’t disappointed me so far and this album from Killing Touch is surely worthy of purchasing. Genuine songs, great vocals, heavy guitars and a powerful production all add to the overall quality. With guest appearances by Oleg Smirnoff (Eldritch, Vision Divine), Andrea Torricini (Vision Divine) and Federico Puleri (Vision Divine), this is surely a fine start for Killing Touch. If you like Vision Divine, you will surely like Killing Touch as well. " - Rock Report
    $15.00
  • Years ago before Mind's Eye were Mind's Eye (they were known as Afterglow), the band had demoed many different vocalists. One of them was German Pascual. Reflecting back on those demos I always felt that Pascual was a diamond in the rough and had great potential. He didn't stick with Mind's Eye and to be honest I don't know what he's been up to all this time. He's landed in the Narnia lineup and damn if he isn't a great singer! Guitarist Carl Johan Grimack has toned down all his Malmsteen-isms that always seemed to fit Narnia into a Christian Malmsteen clone box for all these years. Instead there aren't that many solos and the writing has taken the music into a melodic metal direction with catchy choruses. The lyrical themes are still religious and that seems to fit Pascual well as he's also gone down that path.
    $12.00
  • At this point with The Flower Kings on hiatus, Jonas Reingold's "other" band Karmakanic has stepped up to the plate and assumed the mantle of Swedish neo kings. Highly melodic - dare I say catchy? - with chops from hell. Goran Edman is a great vocalist that is chameleon-like in his ability to fit in with a prog rock or metal band. When will Lalle Larsson get acknowledged as one of the best keyboardists in progressive music? This guy continues to amaze. Reingold sounds like he's strapped on a Rickenbacker and is out-Squiring the old man. Fans of The Flower Kings and Spock's Beard need to get on board if they already haven't. These guys throw it down with the best of 'em. Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • Official 180 gram vinyl reprint. First album from this German band originally released in 1972. While the band's output showed a progressive decline as they went on, their first three albums were pretty good - with this one being the heads and shoulders best. The music revolves around the organ of Frieder Schmidt and phased guitar of Willie Wagner. While not the most complex music, the band settles into a nice groove with wicked soloing through out. There is even some 'tron lurking. Think Birth Control meets Deep Purple. I eat this stuff up - love it!FOREIGN CUSTOMERS PLEASE NOTE THAT WE WILL HAVE TO ADJUST YOUR SHIPPING CHARGES TO MORE ACCURATELY REFLECT OUR COSTS.
    $30.00