Holidays In Eden (2CD)

SKU: 724349337220
Label:
EMI
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Blowout price on the 2CD 24 bit remastered version. Track list:

1. Splintering heart (6:54)
2. Cover my eyes (Pain and Heaven) (3:54)
3. The party (5:36)
4. No one can (4:41)
5. Holidays in Eden (5:38)
6. Dry land (4:43)
7. Waiting to happen (5:01) v 8. This town (3:18)
9. The rakes progress (1:54)
10. 100 nights (6:41)
Total Time: 48:17

Bonus disc (1997 release)
1. Sympathy (single) (3:30)
2. How can it hurt (single) (4:41)
3. A collection (single) (3:00)
4. Cover my eyes (acoustic single) (2:34)
5. Sympathy (acoustic single) (2:30)
6. I will walk on water (Alternate '98 mix) (5:14)
7. Splintering heart (live) (6:42)
8. You don't need anyone (Moles Club demo) (4:04)
9. No one can (demo) (4:51)
10. The party (demo) (5:45)
11. This town (demo) (4:16)
12. Waiting to happen (demo) (5:31)
13.Eric (Video o.s.t.) (2:32)
14. The epic (Fairyground) (demo) (8:31)
Total Time: 63:06

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