Green (Remaster)

SKU: 094637345627
Label:
Virgin Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Produced by Nick Mason, 1978's Green didn't see any significant changes in direction. It's a solid follow up to Motivation Radio and an easy recommendation. This remastered edition features four bonus tracks.

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  • "Many modern CDs come adorned with stickers spewing outrageous superlatives about the contents. Here’s a sticker of my own: Warning To Record Labels: Any Sticker That Reads Best New Band/CD Release Of The Year Will Be Instantly Thrown In The Bin By Any Seasoned Reviewer.However, when Raven stickered their reissue of The Headhunters’ Survival Of The Fittest with the title “The ultimate space-funk album,” they weren’t lying. If they’d written “the ultimate space-funk-jazz album,” they would have been even more accurate.Emerging from Herbie Hancock’s immortal Head Hunters album, The Head Hunters were saxophonist Bennie Maupin, bassist Paul Jackson, guitarist DeWayne ‘Blackbird’ McKnight, percussionist Bill Summers and drummer Michael Clark. This is the same line-up that can be heard on the live album Hancock album, Flood.Released in 1975, Survival Of The Fittest was the band’s debut sans Hancock and made its statement loud and clear in the opening track, ‘God Made Me Funky’ with Maupin launching into an intergalactic sax solo (and featuring backing vocals from The Pointer Sisters!).This Raven reissue offers all six Survival Of The Fittest tracks, showcasing the elastic groove and instrumental virtuosity of this line-up, plus seven bonus tracks lifted from the outfit’s subsequent album, Straight From The Gate, for which they were joined by keyboard player Paul Potyen and singer Derrick Youman. The latter stuff is a little more conventional, delving deeper into vocal funk, but no less fun." - Rhythms.com
    $18.00
  • Limited edition 2LP black vinyl - almost out of print already.  Cut at 45rpm from the original 24 bit files.  Artwork design courtesy of the band.So I finally get to tell the tale of Exivious....Many years ago I was in touch with a Dutch guitarist named Tymon Kruidenier who was working on a new progressive metal band called Exivious. The music was extremely reminiscent of Cynic. At that point in time he was looking for a vocalist. We kicked around a possible collaboration but it never bore fruit. Ultimately Tymon shelved Exivious. Many years later, Cynic reformed and Mr. Kruidenier became the new guitarist, more or less as the replacement for Jason Gobel. With the success of the Cynic reunion, Exivious was resurrected. It would be difficult to think of Exivious as anything other than the instrumental sister band to Cynic. The influences are incredibly strong but the band tends to play up the fusion aspect more. The compositions have that technicality that will send your brain spinning and this quartet has the chops to pull it. Paul Masvidal contributes a guest solo driving the Cynic connection home. Overall its a band stands on its own and will probably top many year end "best of" lists. A brilliant disc - I hope these guys play live. Highest recommendation.
    $26.00
  • "Dog & Butterfly became Heart's fourth million-selling album and placed two songs of opposing styles in the Top 40. Like their Magazine album, Dog & Butterfly peaked at number 17 on the charts, but the material from it is much stronger from every standpoint, with Anne and Nancy Wilson involving themselves to a greater extent. The light, afternoon feel of the title track peaked at number 34, while the more resounding punch of "Straight On" went all the way to number 15 as the album's first single. With keyboard player Howard Leese making his presence felt, and the vocals and guitar work sounding fuller and more focused, the band seems to be rather comfortable once again. Average bridge-and-chorus efforts like "Cook with Fire" and "High Time" aren't spectacular, but they do emit some appeal as far as filler is concerned, while "Lighter Touch" may be the best of the uncharted material. After this album, guitarist Roger Fisher left the band, but Heart didn't let up. 1980's Bebe le Strange showed an even greater improvement, peaking at number five in April of that year." - All Music GuideRemasetered version with 3 bonus tracks.
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  • "Guitarists Guitarist Paul Gilbert returns to the Shrapnel Label with his new CD, Vibrato which is a testament to Gilbert s stunning songwriting and virtuosic soloing abilities.Vibrato boasts four phenomenal new instrumentals, four new vocal tunes and three riveting live tracks"
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  • Woodenhead are one of the great US fusion/prog bands you may not be familiar with.  For the past forty years the band has been ensconced in New Orleans rarely straying outside of the Louisiana area.  The quartet is led by virtuoso guitarist Jimmy Robinson (who you may have seen in that recent AARP commercial!).To encapsulate Woodenhead's sound is actually pretty easy - take 3/4 parts Dixie Dregs and add 1/4 part Happy The Man.  Shake and stir.  Top it off with some local spicy cajun flavor.So while you may not have heard of Woodenhead in your part of the world, they are quite well known in New Orleans.  They have performed there continuously playing at all the local haunts and festivals.  To commemorate the band's 40th anniversary the band has dipped into the archives.  They have released highlights from a gig recorded at the legendary Tipitina's in December 1993, mixed from live tapes previously forgotten and recently unearthed.  Expect a white hot set of cajun fusion.  Highly recommended. 
    $12.00
  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hard card fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.Green Caterpillar has long been a favorite of audiophiles and now fans of kosmigroov have caught on to it.  As a result prices have soared over the years.  Even the old CD reissue goes for $$.The album features Masaru Imada, a jazz pianist of some reknown in Japan.  This features his trio expanded into a quintet with the addition of guitarist Kazumi Watanabe and percussionist Yuji Imamura (see Air).  Typically Imada worked in a standard piano, bass, drum configuration but on this one he really lets his hair down.  Parts of this album feature Imada playing electric keyboards and he's wonderful but the real spice to this lineup is guitarist Watanabe.  The album consists of 4 long tracks.  The title track is the show stopper.  It settles into a funky electric rhythm and then Kazumi lets it rip.  Easily one of the best albums on Three Blind Mice and essential.
    $29.00
  • "After both John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley left Miles Davis' quintet, he was caught in the web of seeking suitable replacements. It was a period of trial and error for him that nonetheless yielded some legendary recordings (Sketches of Spain, for one). One of those is Someday My Prince Will Come. The lineup is Davis, pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, and alternating drummers Jimmy Cobb and Philly Jo Jones. The saxophonist was Hank Mobley on all but two tracks. John Coltrane returns for the title track and "Teo." The set opens with the title, a lilting waltz that nonetheless gets an original treatment here, despite having been recorded by Dave Brubeck. Kelly is in keen form, playing a bit sprightlier than the tempo would allow, and slips flourishes in the high register inside the melody for an "elfin" feel. Davis waxes light and lyrical with his Harmon mute, playing glissando throughout. Mobley plays a strictly journeyman solo, and then Coltrane blows the pack away with a solo so deep inside the harmony it sounds like it's coming from somewhere else. Mobley's real moment on the album is on the next track, "Old Folks," when he doesn't have Coltrane breathing down his neck. Mobley's soul-stationed lyricism is well-suited to his soloing here, and is for the rest of the album except, of course, on "Teo," where Coltrane takes him out again. The closer on the set, "Blues No. 2," is a vamp on "All Blues," from Kind of Blue, and features Kelly and Chambers playing counterpoint around an eight bar figure then transposing it to 12. Jones collapses the beat, strides it out, and then erects it again for the solos of Davis and Mobley. This is relaxed session; there are no burning tracks here, but there is much in the way of precision playing and a fine exposition of Miles' expansive lyricism." - Allmusic
    $5.00
  • New 2 CD remastered and expanded version of Porcupine Tree's masterpiece. This was the pinnacle of their Floyd-inspired psychedelic spacerock period. The bonus disc features some killer stuff like "Stars Die" and "Moonloop (Improvisations)" as well as a 34 minute alternate version of the title track.
    $16.00
  • Amazing live recording from Hiromi's fusion ensemble featuring David Fiuczynski on his wacky fretted/frettless double neck guitar. YOWZA!!!
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  • Excellent US neoprog that will appeal to fans of Marillion and Iluvatar.
    $3.00
  • 1975's Warrior On The Edge Of Time finally sees a reissue courtesy of Esoteric Recordings.  This iconic album features the classic lineup of Dave Brock, Nik Turner, Lemmy, Simon House, Simon King, and Alan Powell.  The album was reissued on CD years ago and has been out of print for a couple of decades.  The band or their management never gave clear explanation at to why the album remained out of print.  One assumes a rights issue that remained unresolved.  This newly remastered version is transferred from the original analogue master tapes and features one bonus track - the b side "Motorhead".  In addition you get a second CD with a new stereo mix from Steven Wilson.  This also contains 5 bonus tracks - one of which is previously unreleased.  If that isn't enough you get a DVD with a 5.1 mix from Steven Wilson, as well as his new stereo mix in 24/96 AND the original stereo mix in 24/96.  Don't know about you but I'm keeping one of these for myself!
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  • "Miles Davis' concert of February 12, 1964, was divided into two LPs, with all of the ballads put on My Funny Valentine. These five lengthy tracks (specifically, "All of You," "Stella by Starlight," "All Blues," "I Thought About You," and the title cut) put the emphasis on the lyricism of Davis, along with some strong statements from tenor saxophonist George Coleman and freer moments from the young rhythm section of pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams. This hour-long LP complements the up-tempo romps of Four & More." - Allmusic
    $5.00
  • First time on CD for this masterful fusion album originally released in 1981.  Guitarist/violinist Alain Eckert was a key member of Art Zoyd from 1976 to 1981 - he popped in and out of the lineup during that time  but recorded on their key albums.  This album was recorded after his final departure from Art Zoyd.  The quartet also includes Patricia Dallio (grand piano), Alain Lecointe (electric bass), and Serge Bringolf (drums).  Eckert's playing is breathtaking - his fingers fly - but he's matched every step of the way by the rest of the quartet.  I'm reminded a bit of Larry Coryell and Pat Martino in his approach.  There are even some undercurrents of Canterbury that creep in.  The album is augmented with 30 minutes of previously unreleased live recordings - just 2 unreleased monster tunes.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • "The first Mahavishnu Orchestra's original very slim catalog was padded out somewhat by this live album (recorded in New York's Central Park) on which the five jazz/rock virtuosos can be heard stretching out at greater length than in the studio. There are only three selections on the disc, all of which were to have been on the group's then-unissued third album -- two of them, guitarist John McLaughlin's "Trilogy: Sunlit Path/La Merede la Mer" and keyboardist Jan Hammer's "Sister Andrea," are proportioned roughly as they were in their studio renditions, while the third, McLaughlin's "Dream," is stretched to nearly double its 11-minute studio length. Each develops organically through a number of sections, and there are fewer lockstep unison passages than on the earlier recordings. McLaughlin is as flashy and noisy as ever on double-necked electric guitar, and Hammer and violinist Jerry Goodman are a match for him in the speed department, with drummer Billy Cobham displaying a compelling, raw power and dexterity to his work as well, especially on the CD edition, which also gives bassist Rich Laird a showcase for his slightly subtler work. Yet for all of the superb playing, one really doesn't hear much music on this album; electricity and competitive empathy are clearly not enough, particularly on the 21-minute "Dream," which left a lot of fans feeling let down at the end of its side-two-filling run on the LP. In the decades since this album was released, the studio versions of these three pieces, along with other tracks being worked up for their third album, have appeared as The Lost Trident Sessions -- dating from May and June of 1973 -- thus giving fans a means of comparing this repertory to what the band had worked out (or not worked out) in the studio; and Between Nothingness and Eternity has come up a bit in estimation as a result, benefiting as it does from the spontaneity and energy of a live performance, though even that can only carry this work so far -- beyond the personality conflicts that broke up the band, they seem to have been approaching, though not quite reaching, a musical dead end as well." - Allmusic
    $5.00