Green (Remaster)

SKU: 094637345627
Label:
Virgin Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Produced by Nick Mason, 1978's Green didn't see any significant changes in direction. It's a solid follow up to Motivation Radio and an easy recommendation. This remastered edition features four bonus tracks.

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  • XRCD24 ediition of this audiophile reference album.  XRCD features JVC's proprietary mastering process.  The results speak for themselves.  Typically these sell for quite a bit more but we uncovered a small cache in a warehouse 8,000 miles away from NJ.World-class bassists David Friesen and Glen Moore join forces for an outstanding new recording of jazz standards and originals."Nineteen duets that explore the limits of improvisation, from blowing-on-changes to aleatoric adventures.All of the music is fascinating" "...the free-swinging stuff like "Stride La Conga" and "Sweet Georgia Brown" is the most satisfying"Overall rating A- Bass Player Magazine.
    $12.00
  • "The first Mahavishnu Orchestra's original very slim catalog was padded out somewhat by this live album (recorded in New York's Central Park) on which the five jazz/rock virtuosos can be heard stretching out at greater length than in the studio. There are only three selections on the disc, all of which were to have been on the group's then-unissued third album -- two of them, guitarist John McLaughlin's "Trilogy: Sunlit Path/La Merede la Mer" and keyboardist Jan Hammer's "Sister Andrea," are proportioned roughly as they were in their studio renditions, while the third, McLaughlin's "Dream," is stretched to nearly double its 11-minute studio length. Each develops organically through a number of sections, and there are fewer lockstep unison passages than on the earlier recordings. McLaughlin is as flashy and noisy as ever on double-necked electric guitar, and Hammer and violinist Jerry Goodman are a match for him in the speed department, with drummer Billy Cobham displaying a compelling, raw power and dexterity to his work as well, especially on the CD edition, which also gives bassist Rich Laird a showcase for his slightly subtler work. Yet for all of the superb playing, one really doesn't hear much music on this album; electricity and competitive empathy are clearly not enough, particularly on the 21-minute "Dream," which left a lot of fans feeling let down at the end of its side-two-filling run on the LP. In the decades since this album was released, the studio versions of these three pieces, along with other tracks being worked up for their third album, have appeared as The Lost Trident Sessions -- dating from May and June of 1973 -- thus giving fans a means of comparing this repertory to what the band had worked out (or not worked out) in the studio; and Between Nothingness and Eternity has come up a bit in estimation as a result, benefiting as it does from the spontaneity and energy of a live performance, though even that can only carry this work so far -- beyond the personality conflicts that broke up the band, they seem to have been approaching, though not quite reaching, a musical dead end as well." - Allmusic
    $5.00
  • "Miles Davis' concert of February 12, 1964, was divided into two LPs, with all of the ballads put on My Funny Valentine. These five lengthy tracks (specifically, "All of You," "Stella by Starlight," "All Blues," "I Thought About You," and the title cut) put the emphasis on the lyricism of Davis, along with some strong statements from tenor saxophonist George Coleman and freer moments from the young rhythm section of pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams. This hour-long LP complements the up-tempo romps of Four & More." - Allmusic
    $5.00
  • "After both John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley left Miles Davis' quintet, he was caught in the web of seeking suitable replacements. It was a period of trial and error for him that nonetheless yielded some legendary recordings (Sketches of Spain, for one). One of those is Someday My Prince Will Come. The lineup is Davis, pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, and alternating drummers Jimmy Cobb and Philly Jo Jones. The saxophonist was Hank Mobley on all but two tracks. John Coltrane returns for the title track and "Teo." The set opens with the title, a lilting waltz that nonetheless gets an original treatment here, despite having been recorded by Dave Brubeck. Kelly is in keen form, playing a bit sprightlier than the tempo would allow, and slips flourishes in the high register inside the melody for an "elfin" feel. Davis waxes light and lyrical with his Harmon mute, playing glissando throughout. Mobley plays a strictly journeyman solo, and then Coltrane blows the pack away with a solo so deep inside the harmony it sounds like it's coming from somewhere else. Mobley's real moment on the album is on the next track, "Old Folks," when he doesn't have Coltrane breathing down his neck. Mobley's soul-stationed lyricism is well-suited to his soloing here, and is for the rest of the album except, of course, on "Teo," where Coltrane takes him out again. The closer on the set, "Blues No. 2," is a vamp on "All Blues," from Kind of Blue, and features Kelly and Chambers playing counterpoint around an eight bar figure then transposing it to 12. Jones collapses the beat, strides it out, and then erects it again for the solos of Davis and Mobley. This is relaxed session; there are no burning tracks here, but there is much in the way of precision playing and a fine exposition of Miles' expansive lyricism." - Allmusic
    $5.00
  • Perhaps inspired by the passing of the legendary Jon Lord (who the album is dedicated to) or by the creative infusion from producer Bob Ezrin, Deep Purple's 19th studio album arrives firing on all cylinders.  Sure I miss Ritchie Blackmore.  Steve Morse is Steve Morse.  A legend...but he brings a different element to the band that to my ears was always defined by the neoclassical explorations of Blackmore.  Getting past that this album is a pure smoker.  Don Airey replaced Jon Lord over a decade ago.  He's always played the hell out of the Hammond organ and he doesn't disappoint here.  He's the perfect replacement for Jon Lord and even adds his own imprint in some not so subtle ways.  Oh yeah - Ian Gillan sounds great.  I wasn't a huge fan of the last couple of albums but this one sure does kick some major ass.This is the deluxe digipak edition.  It comes with one bonus track on the CD and a DVD that has interviews and bonus live clips.
    $15.00
  • Remastered edition."When vocalist-guitarist Roger Hodgson left Supertramp after 1982's ...famous last words..., few could have guessed that the band would continue and solidify its pop-oriented songcraft, let alone re-embrace its progressive-rock roots on 1985's underrated Brother Where You Bound. With vocalist-keyboardist Rick Davies firmly in control -- he wrote all the music and lyrics -- the album examined tensions at the tail end of the Cold War. In a thematic sense, Brother Where You Bound is dated and hasn't aged very well -- Davies' politically oriented lyrics are heavy-handed -- but the music is a pleasure. The crystalline sound of the album, particularly Davies' piano, is breathtaking; kudos to co-producers David Kershenbaum and Supertramp and engineer Norman Hall. The hit single "Cannonball" is a jazz-rock delight, especially in full-length album form. Lyrically, it can be interpreted as Davies' feelings of betrayal at Hodgson's departure, but the piano, percussion and horns are superb. Saxophonist John A. Helliwell, bass guitarist Dougie Thomson, and drummer Bob Siebenberg all contribute vital parts, as does guest trombonist Doug Wintz. "No Inbetween" begins with a lovely, bittersweet percussion (or synthesizer?) and piano melody. "Better Days" is a rather bleak look at the unfulfilled promises of the "good life" in Western society; the dramatic music is highlighted by guest Scott Page's flute solos. The fantastic title track examines Cold War paranoia and clocks in at more than 16 minutes; after the creepy opening narration taken from George Orwell's 1984, the song becomes a composite of several complex prog-rock "movements." Pink Floyd's David Gilmour contributes the searing, distorted guitar solos. Unfortunately, Brother Where You Bound never received the attention it deserved; it isn't a perfect album, but it was a gutsy project for Supertramp to take on." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Here's another one of those great German bands that fell through the cracks but thanks to Long Hair Music, their music is available for us to hear.  For Example was a large scale ensemble HEAVILY influenced by Chicago Transit Authority.  Notice I mentioned CTA as opposed to Chicago - this was not commercial music like the later incarnations.  For Example also utilized a horn section to excellent effect but also like their US counterparts there is killer guitar work all over this material.  Vocals are present but the music is predominantly instrumental.  So basically excellent jazz rock with killer guitar leads.This set consists of a session the band recorded for SWF Radio in 1973 as well as unreleased demos from 1972 while they were shopping for a record deal that never came.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • Woodenhead are one of the great US fusion/prog bands you may not be familiar with.  For the past forty years the band has been ensconced in New Orleans rarely straying outside of the Louisiana area.  The quartet is led by virtuoso guitarist Jimmy Robinson (who you may have seen in that recent AARP commercial!).To encapsulate Woodenhead's sound is actually pretty easy - take 3/4 parts Dixie Dregs and add 1/4 part Happy The Man.  Shake and stir.  Top it off with some local spicy cajun flavor.So while you may not have heard of Woodenhead in your part of the world, they are quite well known in New Orleans.  They have performed there continuously playing at all the local haunts and festivals.  To commemorate the band's 40th anniversary the band has dipped into the archives.  They have released highlights from a gig recorded at the legendary Tipitina's in December 1993, mixed from live tapes previously forgotten and recently unearthed.  Expect a white hot set of cajun fusion.  Highly recommended. 
    $12.00
  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hard card fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.Green Caterpillar has long been a favorite of audiophiles and now fans of kosmigroov have caught on to it.  As a result prices have soared over the years.  Even the old CD reissue goes for $$.The album features Masaru Imada, a jazz pianist of some reknown in Japan.  This features his trio expanded into a quintet with the addition of guitarist Kazumi Watanabe and percussionist Yuji Imamura (see Air).  Typically Imada worked in a standard piano, bass, drum configuration but on this one he really lets his hair down.  Parts of this album feature Imada playing electric keyboards and he's wonderful but the real spice to this lineup is guitarist Watanabe.  The album consists of 4 long tracks.  The title track is the show stopper.  It settles into a funky electric rhythm and then Kazumi lets it rip.  Easily one of the best albums on Three Blind Mice and essential.
    $29.00
  • Budget priced 5CD set in a slimline case featuring the following albums:ManDo You Like It Here Now, Are You Settling In?Be Good To Yourself At Least Once A DayRhinos, Winos & LunaticsSlow Motion
    $21.00
  • Killer price - check around!Recorded September 24th, 1969 at London's Royal Albert Hall, Jon Lord's Concerto For Group and Orchestra really was a meeting of two different worlds, combining rock and classical modes. The first album to feature the classic Mk2 line-up of Deep Purple, it was originally released on Harvest Records in 1970 as a single LP. Now across six sides of vinyl, this is the very first time that the night's entire performance, starting with Sir Malcolm Arnold conducting The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra for his Symphony No. 6, Op. 95, and ending with the encore of the Third Movement: Vivace-Presto, has appeared on LP.Deep Purple survived a seemingly endless series of lineup changes and a dramatic mid-career shift from grandiose progressive rock to ear-shattering heavy metal to emerge as a true institution of the British hard rock community; once credited in The Guinness Book of World Records as the globe's loudest band. Their revolving-door roster launched the careers of performers including Ritchie Blackmore, David Coverdale, and Ian Gillan."Ritchie Blackmore sounds great and plays his heart out, and you can tell this band is going to go somewhere, just by virtue of the energy that they put into these extended pieces." -Bruce Eder, allmusic.comFeatures:• 180g Vinyl• Triple LP• 2002 remix & remasterMusicians:Jon Lord, keyboardsRitchie Blackmore, guitarIan Gillan, vocalsRoger Glover, bassIan Paice, drumsThe Royal Philharmonic OrchestraMalcolm Arnold, conductorSelections:LP 1 - Side 1:Sir Malcolm Arnold's Symphony No.6, Op.951. 1st Movement: Energico2. 2nd Movement: Lento3. 3rd Movement: Con FuocoLP 1 - Side 2:1. Hush2. Wring That NeckLP 2 - Side 3:1. Child In TimeLP 2 - Side 4:Concerto for Group and Orchestra1. First Movement: Moderato - AllegroLP 3 - Side 5:Concerto for Group and Orchestra1. Second Movement: AndanteLP 3 - Side 6:Concerto for Group and Orchestra1. Third Movement: Vivaco - Presto2. Encore 
    $42.00
  • "A never before released full length concert album from one of the greatest undiscovered gems of 70s rock, Captain Beyond!Formed in 1971 by members of Deep Purple, Iron Butterfly & Johnny Winter s band, Captain Beyond is heavy, spacey and most definitely FAR OUT!This show was recorded just after the release of the band s second album, Sufficiently Breathless, during the their tour with King Crimson!Liner notes by noted rock historian Dave Thompson!"
    $15.00
  • This is a digibook edition of this classic Supertramp album.  Its long been an audiophile favorite and now it features a remaster via Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound.
    $9.00
  • The late Michael Hedges was one of the great visionary guitarists of our lifetimes. He used tapping techniques on acoustic guitar to create a wall of sound. He was influenced by John Fahey and Leo Kottke and made us all rethink what can possibly be done with an acoustic guitar.  Introspective but addictive.  If you have any interest in guitar you need to hear this album.
    $5.00