Four & More ($5 Special)

SKU: CK93595
Label:
Columbia Legacy
Category:
Jazz
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"In an odd bit of programming, Columbia placed the ballads from Miles Davis' February 12, 1964, concert on My Funny Valentine and the uptempo romps on this LP. Davis, probably a bit bored by some of his repertoire and energized by the teenage Tony Williams' drumming, performed many of his standards at an increasingly faster pace as time went on. These versions of "So What," "Walkin'," "Four," "Joshua," "Seven Steps to Heaven," and even "There Is No Greater Love" are remarkably rapid, with the themes quickly thrown out before Davis, George Coleman, and Herbie Hancock take their solos. Highly recommended and rather exciting music, it's one of the last times Davis would be documented playing a full set of standards." - Allmusic

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  • Remastered edition."Nestled between the accomplished Crime of the Century album and 1977's Even in the Quietest Moments, Crisis? What Crisis? may not have given the band any chart success, but it did help them capture a fan base that had no concern for Supertramp's commercial sound. With Rick Davies showing off his talent on the keyboards, and Roger Hodgson's vocals soaring on almost every track, they managed to win back their earlier progressive audience while gaining new fans at the same time. Crisis received extensive air play on FM stations, especially in Britain, and the album made it into the Top 20 there and fell just outside the Top 40 in the U.S. "Ain't Nobody But Me," "Easy Does It," and the beautiful "Sister Moonshine" highlight Supertramp's buoyant and brisk instrumental and vocal alliance, while John Helliwell's saxophone gives the album even greater width. The songwriting is sharp, attentive, and passionate, and the lyrics showcase Supertramp's ease at invoking emotion into their music, which would be taken to even greater heights in albums to come. Even simple tracks like "Lady" and "Just a Normal Day" blend in nicely with the album's warm personality and charmingly subtle mood. Although the tracks aren't overly contagious or hook laden, there's still a work-in-process type of appeal spread through the cuts, which do grow on you over time." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • "By the time this long-player hit the street, Roy Buchanan (guitar/vocals) had already departed from his oft-acrimonious relationship with Polydor Records. To their credit, the label issued Live Stock (1975), which captured the artist in performance at Town Hall in New York City on November 27, 1974. This disc features the recently corralled combo of Bill Price (vocals), John Harrison (bass), Malcolm Lukens (keyboards), and Byrd Foster (drums/vocals). Interestingly, the instrumentalists would reconvene behind Buchanan for his next two studio albums, A Street Called Straight (1976) and Loading Zone (1977), as well as the thoroughly superior, import-only Live in Japan (2003). With the exception of the seminal Snakestretchers, this aggregate would stay with the guitarist for longer than any of his numerous other support bands. Practically by default, having returned Buchanan to the stage, the music instantly becomes more conducive to inspiration. The set list highlights both a sampling from earlier efforts, as well as a few covers that are personalized by Buchanan's inimitable stringed artistry. Whether by design or serendipity, each track focuses on his animated solos. Ranging from the driving boogie of Roy Milton's "Reelin' and Rockin" [note: not to be confused with Chuck Berry's rock & roll anthem of virtually the same name] to the stinging fretwork that commences the Memphis soul of Al Green's slithery "I'm a Ram," Buchanan is undeniably at the peak of his abilities. The spirited reading of "Further on up the Road" is particularly worthwhile, as his leads alternately from a rapid-fire slide action to emphatic wails that punctuate the melody with equal measures of deadly accuracy and limber precision. Live Stock is a primary recommendation for all dimensions of blues guitar lovers and those interested in experiencing the craftsmanship of the man once hailed as "The Greatest Unknown Guitarist In The World."" - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Yet another brilliant work from this Norwegian prog band.  The Greatest Show On Earth is the band's third effort.  While the first album Identity delved into alternative/prog realms bearing similarity to Radiohead, their second album All Rights Removed was full on Pink Floyd worship.  This latest effort carries on in similar fashion.  There are parts of the album that were written with tracing paper.  It evokes the mood and feel of Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, and maybe even a bit of The Wall.  This isn't to say the band doesn't inject any personality of their own - they do.  There are contemporary elements, its just that when they go into full on Pink Floyd mode its so apparent and so well executed that it blinds you to everything else that is going on.  What Bi Kyon Ran is to King Crimson or The Watch is to Genesis, Airbag is to Pink Floyd.  Original?  Truth be told not really.  It doesn't matter, its so well executed that you will just immerse yourself in the listening experience.  Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • "Kiko Loureiro is the guitar virtuoso from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At 19, Loureiro joined the metal band, Angra in 1991. In 2005, Loureiro released his first solo album, No Gravity. Loureiro started a project called Neural Code in 2009 with drummer Cuca Teixeira and bassist Thiago Espirito Santo. He has maintained a successful career both with his band and as a solo performer releasing seven studio albums with Angra and three solo albums. Loureiro has now released his forth solo studio album, Sounds Of Innocence.With his fourth studio album, Loureiro takes influences from jazz, blues, traditional Brazilian music, and mixes it with progressive metal to create an album full of fresh sounds while remaining true to his progressive metal roots. Felipe Andreoli and Virgil Donati provide bass and drums for Sounds Of Innocence.Within the first few seconds of “Gray Stone Gateway” you can see why Loureiro has been ranked as one of the top guitarists in the world. He provides some amazing guitar solos throughout this song. The solos are performed at incredible speeds, and should really be listened to fully appreciate. Felipe Andreoli and Virgil Donati do a good job at keeping up with this pace to make for a full energy song.“El Guajiro” has a heavier and metal feeling than some of the other songs. Donati does an excellent job on drums on this song, and Andreoli helps to give this song a truly metal sound with his deep bass playing. Louriero is, of course, excellent on this song, playing amazing techniques that almost boggles the mind to hear. Also of note, this song contains traditional Brazilian rhythm instruments being played that help to keep the song fresh.The more progressive rock sounding, “Mãe D'Água,” is a great instrumental track that showcases Loureiro’s guitar abilities as well as several other instruments. Loureiro plays slower solos on this track, but still articulates his message very well using jazz influences to create a great rock song. Donati and Andreoli provide great accompaniment to Loureiro’s guitar sounds.Kiko Loueiro is one of the best guitar players alive, and with Sounds Of Innocence he shows that he will only continue to get better as time goes by. His latest album is a great piece of progressive metal art. Anybody who loves amazing guitar skills should check out Kiko Loueiro. You won’t be disappointed with Sounds Of Innocence." - Prog Rock Music Talk
    $13.00
  • Produced by Nick Mason, 1978's Green didn't see any significant changes in direction. It's a solid follow up to Motivation Radio and an easy recommendation. This remastered edition features four bonus tracks.
    $12.00
  • "If you listened to the Mahavishnu Orchestra in the 1970s you are familiar with his keyboard wizardry. If you’re a fan of the Indiana Jones movies you have heard his piano. You might also have come across his works by watching US documentary films or TV series. Indeed, this man has “more than one iron in the fire”, as the saying goes. Since the 1980s Stu Goldberg is a highly requested soundtrack composer and session musician for Jerry Goldsmith, Lalo Schifrin and the like. Yet in recent years he began recording as a jazz musician again, and by doing so, resumed his early career which was exceptional in every way.Having caused a sensation at the Monterey Jazz Festival, when he was merely 17, Goldberg became a member of John McLaughlins Mahavishnu Orchestra, toured the world and played with Al Di Meola, Freddie Hubbard, Wayne Shorter, Billy Cobham, Jack Bruce and Alphonse Mouzon from the 1970s on. But it was the teamwork with the latter who finally set the ball rolling for Goldbergs solo career. And Joachim Ernst Berendt, of course, on who you can put the blame for many gems in the MPS vault. Since it was Berendt who produced Stu’s first LP “Solos – Duos - Trios” (1978) which already revealed Goldberg’s open-minded, organic and at the same time experimental philosophy, as he paired his piano and synthesizer with the guitar by one Larry Coryell and the Indian violin of L Subramaniam. Encouraged by label owner Brunner-Schwer, Goldberg created another three contributions to the MPS catalogue on his own, culminating in the album you now have in hand, which was long out-of-print and now is available on CD. It certainly ranks as the most elaborate and best thought-out work in Goldberg’s solo discography.Recorded and mixed in Hollywood in the August of 1981 “Eye Of The Beholder” holds many surprises: The title track is a rollicking opener which shows Stu in a virtuoso mood developing his solo parts in a very organic way. Teaming up is his brother Ken on sax whose recording debut we can witness here. “New Love” is a lavishly orchestrated piece with piano and strings under the lead of violinist Doug Cameron creating rich colours – it also features a tremendous bass solo by Jim Lacefield and plainly points at Goldberg’s cinematic capacity. This is also the case with “Song Burst”: Energetic and equally lyrical it unites a burning band with the driving pulse of drummer Dave Crigger (whom Goldberg knew through their common work in Don Ellis’ band) and quartet interludes of a nearly baroque character. “Daybreak, Sunbeam” and the following “Daybreak” must be seen as a suite, revealing a wide range of influences from the romantic period of Chopin and Rachmaninoff to daring modern jazz improvisation along its course, the two Goldberg brothers often playing side by side before Stu recaptures the first part with a splendid solo. “Montreal” once again shows all the qualities of this album, displaying a fine interaction between jazz band and strings with space for solo highlights, notably Ken on flute this time, and conga player Lee Pastora adding his skills to the Latin touch of the final section."
    $24.00
  • Remastered edition. Although it's not my personal favorite of the Camel canon (that would probably be Mirage or Moonmadness) it is probably their most popular. This amazing long conceptual work is augmented by 5 bonus cuts.
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  • MY BROTHER THE WIND is an improvisational cosmic rock collective consisting of members of widely known Swedish acts Makajodama, Magnolia, Animal Daydream and most notably Anekdoten, one of the more widely recognized names in the 1990s prog rock revival.Recorded live in the studio with no overdubs during a single day in January 2013, Once There Was A Time When Time And Space Were One captures the collective's progressive soundscape qualities with incredible analogue studio production. The band utilized 6 and 12 string acoustic and electric guitars, Mellotron, flute, bass, drums, congas and more to complete the task. Expect 45 minutes of the band's most succinct material to date, recorded deep in the snowy, forested, Swedish wilderness.In 2013, MBTW expanded into an even wider fanbase, having been invited to play the mighty Roadburn Festival in Tilburg, Holland, as well as at Duna Jam in Sardinia.  At the invitation of Opeth’s Mikael Okerfeldt, guitarist Nicklas Barker returned to Roadburn to perform an improv set with Dungen guitarist Reine Fiske.Those who frequent the works of Popol Vuh, Amon Duul, Sun Ra, Träd, Gräs Och Stenar, Albert Ayler, Ash Ra Tempel, Gong, Pink Floyd and other visionary, psychedelic rock artists are advised to investigate this act. "Lush and instrumental for its duration, My Brother the Wind‘s third full-length, Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One (released by Free Electric Sound/Laser’s Edge), rolls out of the speakers much easier than its title rolls off the tongue, though both title and the work itself satisfy rhythmically. The Swedish four-piece — they now seem to be a bass-less trio with Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten) and Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama) on electric/acoustic 12-strong guitar and Daniel Fridlund Brandt on drums, but Ronny Eriksson plays bass on the album — reportedly recorded live to two-inch tape on a vintage machine, and the passion they put in bleeds readily into the nine-song/45-minute outing, fleshed with liberal splashes of Mellotron courtesy of Barker to play up a ’70s prog feel in a piece like the 12-minute “Garden of Delights.” That’s hardly the only point at which those sensibilities emerge, but even more than that, the primary vibe here is one of gorgeous heavy psych exploration, the band adventuring and feeling their way through the material as they go.On peaceful moments like the title-track, which arrives as the penultimate movement before “Epilogue” leads the way back to reality — accordingly, “Prologue” brings us in at the start — that exploration is positively serene, the 12-string complemented by spacious electric tones spreading out across vast reaches, but Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One offers more than drone and psychedelic experiments. Subtly pushed forward by Brandt‘s drums, pieces like “Into the Cosmic Halo” and even “Epilogue” enact classic space rock thrust, and even “Song of Innocence Part 1,” the first part of the journey after the backward atmospherics of “Prologue” introduce, has some cosmic feel amid its echoing solos. Its subsequent complement, “Song of Innocence Part 2,” swells to life on an even more active roll, waves of amp noise up front while drums and bass groove out behind, waiting for the guitars to catch up, which they do in a suitably glorious payoff, relatively brief but masterfully engaging, setting a momentum that continues well into “Garden of Delights,” a focal point for more than its length.Because the songs flow so well one to the next, some directly bleeding, others giving a brief pause, and because later cuts like “Thomas Mera Gartz” — named in honor of the drummer for ’70s Swedish proggers Träd, Gräs och Stenar — and the title-track have a quieter take, it’s tempting to read some narrative into the shifts of Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One, but with the material not being premeditated, I’m not sure that’s the intention so much as a signal it’s well arranged. In any case, the album offers an immersive, resonant listen, with tonal richness to spare and the presence of mind to keep a sense of motion even in its stillest parts and a balance of organic elements — Danielsson‘s recorder and Brandt‘s percussion on “Misty Mountainside,” the 12-string, etc. — amid a wash of effects and swirling psychedelia. This attention to sonic detail makes Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One more than just a collection of jams, and adds further purpose to the already worthy cause of My Brother the Wind‘s thoughtful musings, wandering and not at all lost." - The Obelisk
    $13.00
  • "A never before released full length concert album from one of the greatest undiscovered gems of 70s rock, Captain Beyond!Formed in 1971 by members of Deep Purple, Iron Butterfly & Johnny Winter s band, Captain Beyond is heavy, spacey and most definitely FAR OUT!This show was recorded just after the release of the band s second album, Sufficiently Breathless, during the their tour with King Crimson!Liner notes by noted rock historian Dave Thompson!"
    $15.00
  • Legit CD reissue of this somewhat obscure but simply unbelievably great fusion masterpiece. Horacee Arnold is a noted percussionist who worked (and still works) in the jazz arena beginning in the 50s. In 1974 he cut this fusion epic with a stellar cast of performers. Check out this lineup:Horacee Arnold - drums, tymps and percussionJan Hammer - Moog synthesizer, electric and acoustic pianoRick Laird - bassDavid Friedman - vibes and bass marimbaRalph Towner - 12 string guitarDom Um Romao - percussionArt Webb - flute and alto fluteSonny Fortune - soprano sax and fluteJohn Abercrombie - electric guitarGeorge Mraz - bassClint Huston - bassDave Johnson - percussion and congasSo in essence think Mahavishnu Orchestra with John Abercrombie subbing for John McLaughlin with members of Weather Report and the fusion community guesting. Jan Hammer blows the joint apart with some of his most incendiary Moog work ever. Long tracks filed with dynamic interplay between guitar, keys and flute and percussion. Masterful music masterfully played.  Comes with one bonus track!  BUY OR DIE!
    $14.00
  • A great archival score from this relatively new label out of Poland that is concentrating on Eastern European jazz and rock.  Previously unreleased live recording from 1975."SBB haven proven that there could be a world-class band in Poland. Sent on tour to Sweden in May 1975 to open for the second-rate British act Jack the Lad, SBB quickly stole the show and brought the house down. Contracted for the Roskilde Festival in 1978 as the first group from Poland ever. In their native country they were capable of playing as many as four concerts a day at one venue, and still all the tickets were sold out. They were big. Thanks to the previously unreleased live recording from 1975 we can prove it once again.The memorable performance at the „Jazz nad Odrą” festival in March 1975 was one of the very first to feature the band’s completely new setlist used (with a few alterations) during the next twelve months. The musicians performed the tracks from their second (not yet released) and third (not yet recorded) album, including the biggest hit up to date, „Z których krwi krew moja”. All the songs were merged in one long suite, incrusted with fierce and powerful improvisations. In 1976 the band began to expand the variety of instruments used and, as a result, never returned to the progressive (and aggressive!) formula so typical of 1975. Thanks to the Wrocław recording, however, we are lucky to experience once again the energy that radiated from the three extraordinary musicians.The material has been remastered from the original tapes in pristine quality."
    $15.00
  • "The debut recording from the Dixie Dregs (The Great Spectacular is considered a demo) stands as one fusion's high-water marks. This music is wholly original and played with a freshness and vigor that had begun to wane in a genre that was becoming a model in self-parody. The influences here are plentiful, but it is the country roots that provide the music with its vitality. Founder/guitarist Steve Morse proved to be an important new guitarist, offering an inimitable style with the technique the music demands. The music is complex and challenging, but that's easy to overlook due to the band's sunny approach. While they would go on to create more fully realized recordings, this one proved that fusion had a soul." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Latest from this fine French band. Nemo is led by guitarist JP Louveton who is also the lead singer. Barbares features all long tracks including the 26 minute title piece. The music of Nemo is quite dynamic. Louveton is a fine player with has a bit of John Petrucci in him. His instrumental foil is keyboardist Guillaume Fontaine who takes a more symphonic approach to his playing. While there is more than enough flash he tends to emphasize textures over blazing fast solo runs. For some reason Louveton has a reluctance to sing in English. If could get over this the band might be able to expand their following on a much broader level. Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • Tasty and previously unreleased live set from 1978 by the former violinist of Transit Express. The lineup includes Transit Express bandmate Serge Perathoner on keyboards. This is very reminsicent of the work that Jean Luc Ponty and Didier Lockwood were creating around the same time. The source material is a bit flat in production but doesn't really detract. A great historical sonic document for any fan of fusion and French progressive rock.
    $14.00