Floating World Live

SKU: MJR007
Label:
Moon June Records
Category:
Jazz Rock
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This is the one we've all been waiting years for...a complete live performance of the Bundles era Soft Machine with Allan Holdsworth. The broadcast from Radio Bremen has traded hands for years among collectors but here it is transferred from the original broadcast tapes. The 73 minute set is a burner as the band runs through material from Bundles as well as lots of improvs. The smoke will emanate from your speakers - beware! Without question this will be the archival release of the year - nothing can touch it. Amazing...essential...WOW!!

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:58
Rate: 
0
A great recording and a great show from the Bundles era. It proves that this is Soft Machine at their best with Allan Holdsworth. John Marshall is a monster on drums. A must have.
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:58
Rate: 
0
A great recording and a great show from the Bundles era. It proves that this is Soft Machine at their best with Allan Holdsworth. John Marshall is a monster on drums. A must have.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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