Far From The Madding Crowd

The final chapter in the Evermore saga has finally arrived. With new vocalist Nils Patrik Johansson on board the band is poised to take their popularity to the next level. Johansson hails from Sweden and was a remarkable discovery. With a strong set of pipes that instantly remind of "Holy Diver"-era Dio, Johansson has been making a bit of noise of late with the bands Astral Doors and Richard Andersson's Space Odyssey. Truth be told....it was his work with Wuthering Heights that got him those gigs and now you will all understand why. Erik Ravn has fine tuned the sound a bit moving slightly away from the progressive sounds of To Travel For Evermore although it's still a solid mix of neoclassical and progressive metal (just a tad less on the prog side this time). There is a definite infusion of folk elements that blends seamlessly. Tommy Hansen once again produced and with the added time the band had in the studio it is by far their best production yet.

 

So what we have here is folk music, neoclassical metal and symphonic rock all blended together to create a unique musical vision that will appeal to fans of Blind Guardian, Symphony X and Yngwie Malmsteen.

Oh yeah....we've even tossed in a bonus track not found on any other release in the world.

Product Review

Sat, 2012-03-10 00:01
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0
One of the best albums in the genres,if you like a solid epic sounding folk-progressive metal that you can also reflect on the lyrics then buy it asap!
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Product Review

Sat, 2012-03-10 00:01
Rate: 
0
One of the best albums in the genres,if you like a solid epic sounding folk-progressive metal that you can also reflect on the lyrics then buy it asap!
You must login or register to post reviews.
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