Exit Stage Left

SKU: 534632
Label:
Mercury
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Great double live album available at a budget price.

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  • "Probably Bulldozer's most advanced release ever, Neurodeliri starts with a dramatic pipe organ intro that quickly evolves into the massive title track. Although this album still features many of the band's familiar traits, the result is considerably more focused, intense and memorable than IX. Despite some more serious touches, the music on the whole remains strangely uplifting and captivating. Highlights include the awesome title track and Art Of Deception, not to forget about Ilona Had Been Elected which appears to be another amusing song about the band's favorite Ilona Staller. These compositions are not without their rough edges, but eventually all the pieces fit together quite nicely and you can't help really liking some of this release. It seems that with Neurodeliri Bulldozer finally refined their style to the maximum effect." - Classicthrash.com
    $16.00
  • I and Thou is a new band project put together by Renaissance keyboardist Jason Hart. If you've seen Renaissance on their recent tours you've seen Jason perform all the symphonic/orchestral parts that really filled out the sound in a way that the old lineup couldn't without the aid of an orchestra.Not only does Jason play all the keyboards but he also is the lead vocalist and contributes on sundry instruments. His overall sound is extremely reminiscent of Tony Banks. Jason brought in a bunch of ringers from Izz - John Galgano plays bass, Paul Bremner is one of the guitarists, and Laura Meade contributes on backing vocals. Most of the guitar work is handled by Jack Petruzzelli. Oh yeah Steve Hogarth actually makes a guest appearance providing vocals on the last piece "Go Or Go Ahead" - a cover of a Rufus Wainwright tune.The music has a laid back and refined quality but there are still plenty of undercurrents of complexity that are most evident during the instrumental passages. Consisting of 4 epic length pieces plus the one cover the listener will be reminded of Wind And Wuthering period Genesis, Renaissance, Echolyn, and Izz. Quite a beautiful album, rounded out with beautiful cover art courtesy of Annie Haslam. Highly recommended.
    $11.00
  • Darker is the long awaited second album from Swiss progressive rock band Dawn. It has been 6 years since the quartet rocked the prog world with their expert take on old school symphonic rock.Dawn formed in Montreux, Switzerland in 1996.  Since then the band has performed at the famed Montreux Jazz Festival, as well as at Swiss prog rock festivals Progsol, and Montreux Prog Nights.  The band has also opened for Kansas and Fish.  After a series of line up changes the band began to focus on their sophomore release in 2010 and perform them in concert.Dawn’s music is riddled with vintage keyboard sounds and flowing guitar solos.  Plaintive vocals ascribe a kinship to the British Canterbury prog family tree.  The album is conceived as a series of compositions dealing with Man in the 21st century: his fears, his conception of life, his reaction to technology, nuclear power, and the planet’s suffocation.  Darker was recorded in 2013 by Olivier Charmillot and mastered by noted audiophile engineer Bob Katz.
    $14.00
  • "Fortunately, part four of the quadrilogy, the blissfully laidback Ghost, will provide the perfect rest and recuperation at the end of that torrid ordeal.“Deconstruction is a complicated album. It’s got elements of Strapping without all the nihilistic, suicidal tendencies. For the people who want a heavy statement that’s very complicated, I think it’s gonna be the “be all, end all”. However, Ghost is a much more risky record on a lot of levels. It’s a really beautiful, folky, acoustic record with flutes and a real peaceful sentiment. I really like subtlety. That’s why I love Ghost so much. Deconstruction is about as subtle as a boner in sweatpants and that’s great too!”"
    $12.00
  • The Yes Album is the second in a series of remixed and expanded Yes albums.Presented as a double digi-pack format in a slipcase with a booklet featuring new sleeve notes by Sid Smith, along with rare photos and archive material, the album has been mixed for 5.1 Surround Sound from the original studio masters by Steven Wilson and is fully approved by Yes.The CD features a new stereo album mix by Steven Wilson, the studio version of Clap and an extended version of A Venture.The DVD-A features:- a 5.1 DTS Mix and High Resolution Stereo mixes.- DVD-A players can, additionally, access a 5.1 Lossless audio mix (24bit 96khz).- the new album mix in high resolution stereo- the original album mix in a hi-res flat transfer from the original stereo master tape source.- alternate version of The Yes Album drawn from live tracks, singles edits & an extended mixCD - New Stereo Mixes:1. Yours Is No Disgrace2. Clap3. Starship Trooper: Life Seeker / Disillusion / Wurm4. I've Seen All Good People: Your Move / All Good People5. A Venture6. Perpetual ChangeAdditional Tracks:7. Clap (Studio Version)8. A Venture (Extended)DVD-A (Region 0, NTSC):- Album mixed in 5.1 Surround from original multi-track sources.- New Album mix in High Resolution Stereo- Original Album mix (flat transfer) in High Resolution Stereo- Alternate version of The Yes Album drawn from live tracks, singles edits & an extended mixNTSC Region 0 hybrid DVD-A, compatible with all DVD players & DVD-rom drives.DVD-A - Full Track Listing :New Stereo Mixes 24/96 MLP Lossless:1. Yours Is No Disgrace2. Clap3. Starship Trooper: Life Seeker / Disillusion / Wurm4. I've Seen All Good People: Your Move / All Good People5. A Venture6. Perpetual ChangeSurround Mixes (24/96 MLP Lossless):1. Yours Is No Disgrace2. Clap3. Starship Trooper: Life Seeker / Disillusion / Wurm4. I've Seen All Good People: Your Move / All Good People5. A Venture6. Perpetual ChangeOriginal Stereo Mixes (Flat Transfer from original master 24/96 MLP Lossless):1. Yours Is No Disgrace2. Clap3. Starship Trooper: Life Seeker / Disillusion / Wurm4. I've Seen All Good People: Your Move / All Good People5. A Venture6. Perpetual ChangeAdditional Material:The Alternate Album :1. Yours Is No Disgrace (Live, London 1971)2. Clap (Studio Version)3. Starship Trooper (single edit)Life seeker4. I've Seen All Good People (Live, London 1971)5. A Venture (extended mix)6. Perpetual Change (Live, New Haven 1971) 
    $21.00
  • "History will undoubtedly enshrine this disc as a watershed the likes of which may never truly be appreciated. Giant Steps bore the double-edged sword of furthering the cause of the music as well as delivering it to an increasingly mainstream audience. Although this was John Coltrane's debut for Atlantic, he was concurrently performing and recording with Miles Davis. Within the space of less than three weeks, Coltrane would complete his work with Davis and company on another genre-defining disc, Kind of Blue, before commencing his efforts on this one. Coltrane (tenor sax) is flanked by essentially two different trios. Recording commenced in early May of 1959 with a pair of sessions that featured Tommy Flanagan (piano) and Art Taylor (drums), as well as Paul Chambers -- who was the only band member other than Coltrane to have performed on every date. When recording resumed in December of that year, Wynton Kelly (piano) and Jimmy Cobb (drums) were instated -- replicating the lineup featured on Kind of Blue, sans Miles Davis of course. At the heart of these recordings, however, is the laser-beam focus of Coltrane's tenor solos. All seven pieces issued on the original Giant Steps are likewise Coltrane compositions. He was, in essence, beginning to rewrite the jazz canon with material that would be centered on solos -- the 180-degree antithesis of the art form up to that point. These arrangements would create a place for the solo to become infinitely more compelling. This would culminate in a frenetic performance style that noted jazz journalist Ira Gitler accurately dubbed "sheets of sound." Coltrane's polytonal torrents extricate the amicable and otherwise cordial solos that had begun decaying the very exigency of the genre -- turning it into the equivalent of easy listening. He wastes no time as the disc's title track immediately indicates a progression from which there would be no looking back. Line upon line of highly cerebral improvisation snake between the melody and solos, practically fusing the two. The resolute intensity of "Countdown" does more to modernize jazz in 141 seconds than many artists do in their entire careers. Tellingly, the contrasting and ultimately pastoral "Naima" was the last tune to be recorded, and is the only track on the original long-player to feature the Kind of Blue quartet. What is lost in tempo is more than recouped in intrinsic melodic beauty." - Allmusic Guide
    $6.00
  • Killer retro-prog from Norway laced with strong elements of doom metal.  This band is an offshoot from the outrageous Procosmian Fannyfiddlers, a rather bizarre band that created a rather unique, expletive drenched form of burlesque prog.  This is something totally different and a hell of a lot better.  Highly recommended."Abandoned By The Sun’ is a non-linear narrative, its focal point being the dubious disappearance of a 15-year old girl, her disappearance securing a downward spiral and a grave ripple effect that threatens to ruin the lives of everyone close to her. The idea projected is that nothing can be worse than to lose someone dear without getting any answers.Opening track, ‘Sudden Dereliction’, establishes a link to the previous record and the album’s finale, ‘Finite’, offers a glimpse of what really happened that fatal day, though leaving the listeners sufficient interpretive space to make up their own minds. In-between these bookends, the music moves in multiple, unexpected directions, showcasing great melody lines, and a high degree of diversity, underlining the sadness and despair of the libretto’s protagonists.On ‘Abandoned By The Sun’, Mater Thallium explore the inter-human mechanisms at work when a person vanishes without a trace.This is old-school heavy progressive rock, with a twist of doom, topped with flourishes of Scandinavian folk music." 
    $17.00
  • "A while back I reviewed a “live” album that sounded like it was recorded in a pub in the middle of nowhere on a wet Tuesday, attended by one man and his dog.  It was awful.  If you’re going to produce a live album there are rules.  First, the sound has to be good, there’s no point if it isn’t studio quality.  Second, and this is vital, if you are recording an album in front of a live audience, the sound of that audience must make it onto the album.  If you can’t hear them cheering, clapping, singing along you’d have been as well staying in the studio.  After the disappointment of the aforementioned review, I was keeping everything crossed that Live With the Curse would reflect the electric atmosphere at Glasgow’s Classic Grand on that night back in November.  You see, I know the crowd was rocking that night, and I know the band sounded great, because I was there.So, I sat down today to listen to the album, hoping against hope that Eden’s Curse had got it right.  Man have they ever got it right.  I defy anyone to listen to this without feeling like they were actually there.  Mixed and mastered by Dennis Ward, who has worked with the band throughout their career, every bit of the live experience is included, from their onstage introduction by Tom Russell to the little chats with the crowd and the unholy racket the crowd made at every opportunity.Tom Russell, Godfather of Rock is a legend in these parts, he’s been presenting rock radio for longer than I’ve been alive (sorry Tom!) and having him announce you is quite an honour.  From that point on this album is relentless.  Nikola’s vocal never misses a note, Thorsten plays guitar like a man possessed and Paul, John and Steve bring it all together into something pretty close to perfection.  Nikola does a brilliant job of bringing the crowd into the show as well, introducing songs, explaining what they’re about and getting some crowd participation going.  It all adds to the atmosphere, which as I’ve already said is crucial to a live album.Highlights for me include opening track Symphony of Sin, which sets out the bands intentions from the very beginning.  This gig, this album is going to break you.  The pace and energy is non stop, as Nikola roars at the crowd and they roar back.  Covering tracks from all four Eden’s Curse albums the band powers through a set list which translates to a two disc album of over 100 minutes.  It’s long, but it never drags, as the energy refuses to drop.  Towards the end of disc one look out for an extended guitar solo from Thorsten.  Now, I don’t play guitar, but I know enough to know that this man is one of the best guitar players you will see.  He rarely lifts his head, lost in the music but he plays as if he has two pairs of hands.  One of my favourite things about Eden’s Curse is the storytelling in each song, from Masquerade Ball to Rock Bottom.  It means that the songs improve with each listen, as you move from listening to the tune to actually taking in the lyrics.  I have to also mention my personal favourite Eden’s Curse track Evil and Divine.  I don’t know why I love it, I just do.  And that’s what it’s all about.As final track Angels and Demons ends the crowd begin to chant, “Eden’s Curse, Eden’s Curse, Eden’s Curse,” and I sit here straining my ears because if I just listen hard enough I might hear myself.  I cheered them that night, and I’ll be cheering this album from the rooftops.  It’s out on Friday, March 13th and I will personally Curse any of you who don’t buy it!" - Planet Mosh
    $15.00
  • "Zao, French prog-jazz legends from Seventies, reformed in 2004 with original core members Yochk'o Seffer (sax) and Francois "Faton" Cahen (keyboards) along with Gerard Prevost (bass) who was a member of Zao from 1975-77, drummer Francois Causse, who had played with Faton and Seffer before and last, but not least, the new female vocalist Cynthia Saint-Ville. Her addition to the fold will doubtless attract Zeuhl enthusiasts, as her voice is pretty similar to Mauricia Platon, but softer and more sensual, while equally powerful. In Tokyo is a live album recorded during the Japan tour in 2004 and it adds a violinist Akihisa Tsuboy to round out the classic Zao sound which, while more acoustic sounding thanks to Faton largely playing grand piano and only occasionally comping on Fender Rhodes, nonetheless stays true to the classic tone colors of Zao. Versions of pieces like "Isis", "Shardaz", "Zohar" as well as material from Kawana benefit a lot from the addition of female vocals. The only disappointing piece is "Ronach" which doesn't have the same verve and fluid edginess that the original version had (not to mention, Causse sounds a bit stiff here compared to the militantly exuberant hammering of Jean-My Truong on the original version). It was probably a bit too complex piece for the band to pull off. Elsewhere, they deliver. Guest violinist Tsuboy dishes out fiery electric violin solos, at times reminiscent of Lockwood, even though he tends to be obscured during the written sections by sax and voice. Nonetheless, Zao in its current configuration sounds like a tight live act, a bit jazzier than the seventies editions, but nonetheless very enjoyable. Recommended live album for fans of jazzier end of Zeuhl." - Stereomouse
    $15.00
  • Special 2CD tour edition comes with a bonus Acoustic Sessions CD featuring 4 new interpretations, plus "Anathema" recorded at Liverpool Cathedral."It’s been quite a past few years for the incredible Anathema. Honors have been bestowed upon them, they’ve released an instant classic album in “Weather Systems”, and last year they released one of the best live concert films I’ve ever seen, “Universal”. Anathema is on top of the world, and they are only getting bigger. With all of this on their shoulders, they approach the world once again with their new album, “Distant Satellites”, a fitting name for a massive album. Again, with all of their recent success creating huge expectations, can this band meet such critical reception? Needless to say, Vincent Cavanagh on vocals, Danny Cavanagh on guitar, Jamie Cavanagh on bass, John Douglas on percussion, Daniel Cardoso on drums, and Lee Douglas with her wonderful vocals were all up to the challenge.“Distant Satellites” is a very different album from “Weather Systems”, or anything else they’ve done, for that matter. It is different, yet somehow instantly familiar. It includes everything that makes them Anathema, but adds new and exciting elements to their already excellent formula. If you’ve never heard Anathema, their formula (in their last few albums, anyways) includes soaring guitars, amazingly catchy melodies, spiritual lyrics, and emotional flow both vocally and structurally. They are the masters of melody, and they remain complex and progressive even while being simple and accessible. They are truly masters of their craft.This new album, then, is no different in those terms. The melodies return in force, such as the serene beauty of “The Lost Song” parts 1-3. And, yet, there is something different here. The melodic lines are somewhat more complex, less in-your-face, and more organic. This especially shows in the song lengths, most of them being over five minutes. This allows for more growth and more progression. Indeed, then, the melodies on “Distant Satellites”, while not being as instantly lovable or recognizable, are certainly more difficult and possibly will have a longer “shelf life” in my mind. Yes, the orchestrations seem to be lower key, as well, allowing the vocalists to express themselves more personally then ever.There are other improvements, too. I feel that the musicianship is more fervent and on a higher plateau of difficulty than Anathema has tried. Drummer John Douglas, especially, plays amazingly well from start to finish, accenting the music with awesome pounding and fills. The rest of the band are at their peak, too, with Vincent and Lee being especially great with emotional and meaningful vocal performances.“Distant Satellites” is different in more meaningful ways, too. Utilizing post-rock/metal structures is nothing new for Anathema, but they really do perfect them here, as on “Dusk”, a dark, climactic song. Yet, there is a sense of continuity between tracks, too. This is obviously the case between the three parts of “The Lost Song”, but it’s also apparent throughout the album, as if Anathema is telling us a story, convincing us of our true selves and our connection with the universe and with each other.This album is wonderful in the first half, but my excitement reached new heights in the second half. Anathema has taken it upon themselves to change things up a bit. They wanted to progress their sound, but make it all seem so natural. So, in the second half, the album climaxes with one of the best songs, simply called “Anathema”. But then, we are thrown for a loop somewhat, as “You’re Not Alone” features a hefty portion of electronic vibe. It’s great, but the best is still to come.Next, “Firelight”, a darkly ethereal instrumental track that is completely electronic, is thrust upon us, and is followed up by what may possibly be the best song Anathema has ever produced, “Distant Satellites”. This track combines everything that has ever made Anathema great: soaring melodies, climactic structure, gentle spirituality, amazing vocals, and now an electronic beat that is both complex and catchy. Vibrant, mesmerizing, and pure, this track elates me every time I hear it. It takes this album, and my heart, to new heights. The album finishes with a gentle ballad that just seems so fitting, yet it still has the strong electronic influence.So, is “Distant Satellites” a winner? In every way! Is it their best album? I don’t know; it has the potential, but it might take time, just like “Weather Systems” did. What I can tell you is that this new album is more mature, more progressive, more interesting and eclectic, and less formulaic then anything Anathema has crafted yet. It does sacrifice some accessibility and some instant likability for these things, but I respect their decision massively, and I fully expect to see “Distant Satellites” at the tops of many lists at the end of 2014." - Progulator
    $14.00
  • New band rising from the ashes of Rain Fell Within. The band is fronted by their former backup singer Laurie Ann Haus who has a simply stunning voice. Clearly she's had a lot of training as she exhibits amazing range and control. The music fuses progressive rock with gothic metal. So think White Willow meets Within Temptation meets Genesis. Former RFW keyboardist John Battema adds lots of tasty ambient interludes as well as lead synth lines reminding me of Tony Banks. WOW! Killer debut.
    $10.00
  • "The partnership between Magnum guitarist and songwriter Tony Clarkin and vocalist Bob Catley is now well into its fourth decade and yet like a fine vintage wine it grows ever more appealing with age. More than thirty years since their debut Kingdom of Madness was given a rave review by Sounds Geoff Barton who compared them at the time to Starcastle, Yes, Kansas and Queen, Magnum remain a band to be cherished. Whilst those comparisons were justified in the beginning, across albums such as The Eleventh Hour, On A Storytellers Night and Wings of Heaven Magnum developed a style that was uniquely their own as they became one of the UK's most enduring bands with stirring anthems, melodic rockers and power ballads in abundance. After a hiatus during the latter half of the 90's that saw Clarkin and Catley diversify with Hard Rain (or Magnum-lite as it could have been described) the pair brought Magnum out of hibernation with the uncertain Breath of Life in 2002 that was followed by the much improved Brand New Morning two years later. But even this paled when compared with the majestic return that was 2007's Princess Alice and The Broken Arrow and this rich vein of form is carried through into this relatively brisk follow-up, the wonderfully titled Into The Valley Of The Moonking. Ever since the Jeff Glixman - produced Chase The Dragon in 1982 Magnum's artwork has been an important element of the overall package and Moonking is no exception, once again provided by the exquisite touch of fantasy artist Rodney Matthews who has been so effective over the years in bringing Clarkin's initial ideas to life. With Matthews involvement it simply feels like a Magnum album before you have even taken the CD out of the box.The opening 'Intro' is precisely that; Mark Stanway's keyboards conjuring up a windswept landscape that sets the scene for what is to come and segues into the mid tempo 'Cry To Yourself' and whilst it lacks the immediate impact of some of the later tracks it proves to be a solid enough opener. Tony Clarkin's songwriting is nothing short of amazing as he once again delivers lyrics that are truly inspirational, the careworn ballad 'A Face In The Crowd' being a perfect example. Clarkin's lyrics have often dealt with self-belief and perseverance in the face of struggle and adversity ('The Spirit', 'When The World Comes Down', 'Desperate Times') and 'A Face In The Crowd' is another worthy addition to the list. Another theme often revisited has been the futility of conflict and the dramatic 'No-one Knows His Name' joins a canon that includes 'Les Morts Dansent', 'Don't Wake The Lion' and 'The Flood' in remembering those who have been lost on the battlefield. Catley's voice aches with emotion on the stirring 'If I Ever Lose My Mind' although this is hardly a surprise as he never sounds anything less than immaculate.Away from the anthems, 'Take Me To The Edge' and the urgent 'Feels Like Treason' find the band cranking it up a gear and varying the pace with two quality hard rockers. The (near) title track is where Clarkin brings out his blues guitar and combines it with Magnum's grandiose style to blow away the cobwebs whilst the fantasy imagery of the lyric perfectly complements the cover art. Magnum's albums have often closed with sweeping epics and this proves no exception with 'Blood On Your Barbed Wire Thorns' starting like a gritty, up-tempo rocker (with some delicate piano embellishments from Stanway) before taking an altogether different direction around the four minute mark with an instrumental passage that becomes a showcase for an evocative Clarkin solo before Stanway plays the song out. The songwriting and musicianship are exceptional throughout and I don't expect to hear a better album this year so a five star rating is more than justified.Out of the valley of the Moonking Magnum have emerged triumphant. Long may they continue." - Sea Of TranquilityThis is the deluxe edition that comes with a bonus DVD featuring an interview as well as live footage of performances from '92 and '85.
    $18.00
  • Gowy is an undiscovered French band but that won't be for long... This is a new quartet assembled by guitarist Gregory Francois. We were contacted by Greg due to his friendship with Christophe Godin of Morglbl. He thought it might be up our alley and he is spot on. The music on Gowy's debut is primarily instrumental although there are some tunes with French vocals. Musically speaking Freak Kitchen frequently comes to mind with more than a bit of Vai, Zappa and Morglbl tossed in as well. The keyboards, bass and drums all play a supporting role for Greg's extraordinary guitar excursions into outer space. This is much more clever than the typical chops-from-hell disc. Is Essential Tracks really essential? Well I know its essentially clear that a buzz will develop soon. Highly recommended. Check 'em out: Gowy's MySpace Page
    $14.00
  • Stunning return by the Swedish/Danish outfit formerly known simply as Twilight. Keyboardist Finn Zierler has assembled a new lineup that features old members of Twilight as well as vocal God Jorn Lande (Ark, Malmsteen). This is epic symphonic metal with lots of intricacies to keep prog fans from chomping at the bit. A stunning album that features crystalline production from Tommy Hansen. Definitely one of the top 10 metal releases for 2001. Highest recommendation.
    $15.00