Enter Deception

SKU: 145612
Label:
Metal Blade
Category:
Metal/Hard Rock
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Crazy things are going on. Dragonforce is selling like mad and now here is yet another traditional power metal band getting national attention. Cellador are a US band that creates music that harkens back to 80s Iron Maiden. It's a simple formula that seems to be working...again.

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  • This is the original US CD pressing on MCA Records.  
    $5.00
  • "It’s been five years since their last album, Buried Alone: Tales Of Crushing Defeat, but in that time, the lord of Knifeworld, Kavus Torabi, has been very busy indeed. He’s been part of Gong and various other bands, hosted a prog radio show with snooker legend Steve Davis (who is in fact, more interesting than people might have ever suspected) and of course spent his time working on more Knifeworld material.Since his days with Monsoon Bassoon, Torabi has always been someone who writes dense yet strangely hookladen songs. With Knifeworld things are no different, if anything this album is about as ambitious as anything in Torabi’s long and extensive career to date. The Unravelling is an eight song cycle, is performed as an octet, and is nothing if not grandiose in its intensions. The idea of a song cycle might well sound pretentious, and perhaps it is, but what keeps The Unravelling from unravelling into a unwieldy mess is Torabi’s deft songwriting nous and keen ear for a hook. These songs might well form a cycle, but they are all quite capable of operating independently too.Opening track I Can Teach You How To Lose A Fight starts in muted fashion with delicate keyboards and strummed acoustic guitars complimenting Mel Woods’ beautiful but understated vocals. The whirring of clock parts and machinery in the background give a wonky Victorian feel, but also suggest that the cogs that drive the album are slowly clunking into life. Before long the full band has launched into a freakish prog-hymn, like a kind of feral Rick Wakeman freakout. “Why’d you grow those teeth in your heart?” asks Torabi sounding as if his has been chewed up and spat out by an evil Queen. It’s essentially the dialogue of a relationship winding down, but with its winding musical motifs, joyful honking sax parts mixing with solemn vocals and dramatic guitar stabs, the introduction to the album feels like a kind of synopsis of what’s to follow or an overture of sorts. There’s joy, threat, love, anger, fun and a fair bit of magic too.Send Him Seaworthy starts life as a kind of lurching boy’s own adventure, with nautical themes and a sense of wonder seeping into the orchestration, but come the telling conclusion it becomes tale of paranoid love. Don’t Land On Me meanwhile meanders along in a faintly jazzy way until a sharp stabbing rock riff cuts across its bows. Suddenly, it becomes a curious mix of swing, The Osmonds‘ Crazy Horses and Kenny Rogers‘ version of Condition. The Skulls We Buried Have Regrown Their Eyes meanwhile is a woozy old-school nursery rhyme that contains a requisite amount of grotesque imagery.Destroy The World We Love is the pop nugget around which the album truly revolves. It possesses a laid back lollop, a very deliberate hook with the line “secret in your hands” digging deep into the ears early on, but it quickly reveals itself to be an expansive and exquisite journey. Fans of Genesis (and naturally Cardiacs) will find plenty to appreciate here but as usual Knifeworld stop short of being self-indulgent and ensure that the song never disappears up its own firmament.If The Skulls We Buried hinted at something a little unsettling, then This Empty Room Was Once Alive confirms that there is something genuinely creepy lurking under the surface of this album and it just so happens to be in the form of a Victorian ghost story. Fortunately I’m Hiding Behind My Eyes quickly takes over and steers back towards folk inflected prog before things get to terrifying. Once again, the Octet are in fine form creating a bucolic world for the band to inhabit and explore.The key to this album is in its title. It is well written, and beautifully performed, but in order to get the most out of it, a certain amount of unravelling needs to be done. The five year wait has been worthwhile, and Torabi’s Knifeworld seems ready to begin creating its own universe. As strange and creepy as it seems at first, it is fun to spend time exploring." - MusicOMH 
    $15.00
  • Obscure German prog private release from 1976, reissued on vinyl from the master tapes including 2 non-lp bonus tracks.There were many unsigned German prog bands doing their thing in the mid-70s.  El Shalom borrowed a little bit from Genesis and a lot from Faithful Breath and Eloy.  Keyboards remind quite a bit of Eloy but done up in a bit of a low budget way that some will hate and some find endearing.  Vocals are a mix of English and German."I suppose it shouldn’t be surprising that a band with a Hebrew name sings in both German and English. Darned if I could explain this 1976 album, as it’s one of the more unique albums to have come my way in a long time. Leave it to Garden of Delights to reissue this oddball. It would appear the German sung tracks are for their more aggressive work, while they use English for the lighter fantasy fare (ala Yes, Nektar, Eloy). So the Deutsch songs could be seen as the successor to Prof Wolfff or Eulenspygel – that is a heavier rock base, with some snotty attitude. The exception would be the German narrated ‘Alvin Zweistein’, which recalls Minotaurus, when coupled with the spacey nature of the music. One note about the keyboards: They almost seem homemade. The organ is of the mid-1960s variety, whereas there are some electronics that one might hear on some experimental albums from 1967 or 1968 (think Silver Apples). Flute, sax and dual guitars round out the lead chores. Overall, El Shalom have provided us a very intriguing album. There doesn’t appear to be any rhyme or reason to what they were doing, certainly not a play for anything commercial.  “Frost” came out at a time when private releases, such as this, were quite rare and there wasn’t any preset audience expectation. Other than the production quality, which is charmingly muffled, the album is well composed and professional. Don’t make the same mistake I did and pass this one up. A chance encounter allowed me the opportunity and now it will get continual study for a good number of years. CD contains 4 relevant, and good, bonus tracks. Interesting trivia note: “Frost” was recorded in the same obscure, tiny studio as Dom and Kalacakra!" - Cun Cun Revival Blog
    $26.00
  • Tesseract are an incredibly talented djent metal band out of the UK. Smart guys too. There was a tremendous buzz building around the band but they bided their time, waiting to sign with a label. In the meantime they fine tuned the formula, hooking up with vocalist Dan Tompkins and took their material to the next level. The band signed with Century Media, who will release their full length debut ("One") in 2011. As a stop gap release the band put out this 27 minute suite and its a monster. The music is melodic but has a strong technical element. Tompkins sings mostly in a clean style but throws in some barking as well. Think in terms of Sikth or Periphery (but with better vocals). There is even a bit of Zero Hour tossed in there as well. This release will only add fuel to the fire of anticipation. Highly recommended.
    $6.00
  • Exile is the long awaited third album from this British progmetal band.  To-Mera is fronted by Julie Kiss with the principal songwriting coming from guitarist (and her husband) Tom MacLean.  Some of you may recognize Tom's name from his membership in Haken as their bassist.  It gets slightly more confusing as Haken's main composer/guitarist/keyboardist is To-Mera's keyboardist Richard "Hen" Henshall.  Yes life can get complicated sometimes.The new album is a conceptual work about human existence.  Ms. Kiss' vocals flow like a constant river over some real bad ass and complex prog metal.  At times MacLean breaks out some incredible fusion leads taking the band in a whole different direction.  Hen's keys have a very specific sound.  At times you will be reminded for a moment of the Haken sound but in general this doesn't sound like a Haken album.  The album does feature some special guests...Marcela Bovio (Stream Of Passion), Stefan Forte (Adagio), and Ray Hearne (Haken) all make appearances.  An intricate and involving listen, this is easily going to be one of 2012's best metal releases.  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • "Over 5 hours of great performances including the entire Testimony and One albums plus special encores of the Spock's Beard classic, "The Light" featuring Alan Morse, and the Transatlantic epic "Stranger In Your Soul." Also included is a behind-the-scenes documentary with footage of Neal's exclusive acoustic concert, rehearsal footage, "Name That Prog Tune" game with Mike and more!Complete with 4 piece horn section, 6 member female background vocal section, violin and cello, full orchestra percussion with timpani and chimes, dancers, special guests and special staging, this is the most elaborate live release of Neal Morse's career!Neal even flew out Rich Mouser who mixed the original studio albums to do the front of house mix! Neal says "We really went all out this time. I wanted it to be the quintessential presentation and performance of this music." And so it was...and is!Says Mike Portnoy - "I've got to say... as a fan of this wonderful music, how incredible this is! I am so happy to see this come to fruition. This music really deserves this… everything from the incredible presentation, and all these amazing musicians...it's great to hear this music come to life on stage like this. To be doing it in his hometown with all his friends and family present and to be doing it here in this building that has such incredible importance to him and his story, it's elevated the music to a whole new level. This is just been an amazing experience!""
    $20.00
  • New progressive rock/metal trio from the UK that has the chance to blow up big. The band goes for an epic sound with the core trio augmented by the "The Lost Orchestra". Melancholy seems to be the overall theme here reminding of Riverside, Opeth, Tool and even some Pink Floyd. It can get quite heavy at times but overall it would be safe to categorize this as progressive rock. There is the odd growly part that made me think of Opeth - not a bad thing. The symphonic parts are quite beautiful and sad at the same time - Riverside's "Loose Heart" would be an apt comparison. An emotional roller coaster ride with plenty of space and...yes...intricacy. If you like your prog drenched in thick atmosphere this one is going to crush your skull. Highly recommended.
    $19.00
  • "A new interpretation of a classic RPI title! This is quite an undertaking, but it comes off in an outstanding way, giving new life to old friends. In contrast to so many reworkings of old pieces that I've heard in recent years, this one does not leave me only wishing to listen to the original. Rather, the new work stands well on its own, not only helping me listen to the original with new ears, but also bringing new insights and experience.In 1972, Latte e Miele released their debut, an incredibly ambitious work based on the Passion of St. Matthew, "Passio Secundum Mattheum." This is one of the seminal titles of 1970s RPI and has rightfully stood the test of time. The band would never equal this album, although the subsequent title, "Papillon", came close. After that the band broke up for a time, until drummer Alfio Vitanza reformed the band, with new members including bassist Massimo Gori. Their only album, "Aquile e Scoiattoli", has its moments but is inferior to the first two, and the band disbanded a few years later after moving toward more commercial music.In 2008 the band reformed, including all three original members (Vitanza and songwriter/keyboardist Oliviero Lacagnina, as well as guitarist Marcello Giancarlo Dellacasa) and Massimo Gori, bassist from the second generation of the band. The quartet released "Live Tasting", an excellent live album that portended of the good to come. Their time together also produced a wonderful new album, "Marco Polo: Sogni e Viaggi" in 2009.Over the years, Lacagnina never stopped composing his masterpiece, his "Passio". Now the quartet has recorded anew their masterpiece, adding those "new" compositions into the narrative. For example, "Il Pane e il Sangue dell'Alleanza" has been inserted right after "Ultima Cena", and "Il Rinnegamento di Pietro" and "Il Prezzo del Sangue" between "Il Pianto" and "Giuda". Also, the ending has been fleshed out significantly, with four new songs, and the final song, "Come un Ruscello che..." includes the final themes previously entitled "Il Dono della Vita". Also of note, a solo organ piece entitled "Toccata per organo" is placed just before "Calvario"--this is special, as it is an original take from 1972!The instrumentation is true to the spirit of the 1972 piece, although with an updated sound. Ditto the choir, which sometimes on the 1972 version is muted and thin--here the choir parts are strong, lush, and vibrant. The majority of the pieces that were rerecorded for this edition also maintain their compositional structure, although there are a few changes inserted (notably in "I Falsi Testimoni", the new version of "I Testimoni" parts 1 and 2). There is nothing that violates that spirit of the original work, though it is impossible to duplicate its wonderful innocence.Another unique feature of this album is the presence of several prominent figures from RPI providing the spoken Evangelist parts. These include Alvaro Fella (Jumbo), Lino Vairetti (Osanna), Silvana Aliotta (Circus 2000), Paolo Carelli (Pholas Dactylus), Aldo de Scalzi (Picchio dal Pozzo), Sophya Baccini, Elisa Montaldo (Il Tempio delle Clessidre), Giorgio D'Adamo (New Trolls), Max Manfredi, Simonluca, and Paolo Griguolo (Picchio dal Pazzo). It's a nice touch that really rounds out the album.The CD comes in a jewel case with a lyric booklet. I'm told that the pending Japanese version will contain a newly recorded composition as a bonus track. But don't wait for that one--go out and grab this one. You won't be disappointed. Four plus stars (Gnosis 13/15).Edit: I can't stop listening to this! Though it's not quite as good as the original, it's very close. I'm bumping it up to Gnosis 14/15, which is five stars on PA." - ProgArchives
    $16.00
  • As you all know by now, the tracks on Made In Japan were culled from three nights of performances of the Japanese 1972 tour.  This is a new 2CD version of the album.  Disc one features a 2014 remaster of the original mix.  Disc two features the encores from all three nights - remastered from the original analogue stereo masters.
    $20.00
  • "I was totally unaware that Pain Of Salvation was coming out with a new EP until I was offered the chance to review it. While I would not consider myself a Pain Of Salvation die-hard like some of my friends, I really enjoyed "The Perfect Element Pt. I" quite a bit. That being said, their past couple of albums have kind of sucked, especially the rap-metalesque "Scarsick". I know I was definitely wondering what direction Pain Of Salvatioin would be heading next.Pain Of Salvation was formed all the way back in 1984, but their first album was not released until 1997. They have since been releasing albums regularly and built up quite a solid (and at times fanatical) fanbase in the process. The first four tracks on this EP are set to appear on a new two-disc studio album some time in the future.The good news to start off is that this is nothing like "Scarsick"; there’s no rapping, no disco, none of stuff that garnered that album so much criticism. In fact, if one was to compare this to another Pain Of Salvation album, I would say that it is most similar to something that could be found on "Entropia". There is less of a focus on complex arrangements and layered instruments; instead opting for a more straightforward approach. There seems to be a strong influence of 70’s Rock, and not necessarily 70’s prog-rock either.This is not a bad thing, however. In fact, I’m rather glad that this is the direction that the band is taking. In my opinion, Pain Of Salvation was in danger of collapsing under their own ambition and pretentiousness. They needed to step back and focus on what it was that made them such a great band in the first place, especially after several big lineup changes.Each of the four songs that are set to appear on the forthcoming album is excellent. If the rest of the album is on the same level as these four songs, we will have an album that will be right up there with "The Perfect Element Pt. 1" and "Remedy Lane". The interview is mostly just the band screwing around, so that is hardly worthwhile. The Scorpions cover that closes the album is nice, but hardly essential.If you really need a Pain Of Salvation fix, then by all means pick up this EP. However, I would advise against it simply because I believe that these songs that will appear on the forthcoming album will be even stronger when in the context of the album as a whole. This review will hopefully serve as a beacon of hope that disgruntled fans should not give up on this band, at least not yet." - Metal Temple
    $7.00
  • Jabs is settling in and it feels pretty good.  This one doesn't quite hit the heights of Lovedrive but all in all not a bad hard rock album.
    $5.00
  • Wearing their influences on their sleeves this young Utah based band has blown me away with their very progified version of prog-metal. Influences from Metallica, Dream Theater, Fates Warning, Rush and even Yes pop up all over the place. I'm a hardcore sucker for keyboard laced prog and Hourglass' debut is loaded to the hilt with it. Jerry Stenquist's synth leads mesh with Brick Williams' Petrucci-esque leads clawing their way to the forefront on these epic length tracks. Although a latecomer to the band, vocalist Chad Neth has a solid midrange style that slips comfortably within the fold. The rhythm section of Jonathan Berrett and John Dunston hold their own anchoring the proceedings. The 27 minute title track in a monster composition that demonstrates the band's ability to balance old school prog rock with cutting edge prog metal. Flowing and melodic this is the deal. The band doesn't bludgeon you with heaviness but it's the overall scope that makes me categorize this in the metal category. A similar band that I would compare them to would be Clockwork.Sorry to gush - this is about as fine a debut as I've heard in a long time. I can confortably say that this is a band we will hear a lot more from in the future. Naturally I think you should all be falling all over yourselves to hear this band.
    $12.00
  • "The year 2013 has proven to be a very, very busy one for Metallica. From playing sold-out shows all across the globe to just a few nights ago rocking a packed house at the intimate and legendary Apollo Theater in New York City, the legendary metal band is showing no signs of slowing down any time soon. This is most obvious in the simple fact that within the same week, they are celebrating the release of their first ever full-length feature film and its official soundtrack. ‘Metallica Through The Never’ is a live disc fans need to add to their ‘Tallica collection as soon as possible.Recorded over the course of five nights in 2012 – two in Edmonton, Alberta and three in Vancouver, British Columbia – ‘Metallica Through The Never’ features the best of the best from those performances, while packing a few punches fans won’t be expecting. Diving into the soundtrack, it’s easy to think that you’re just listening to a standard recording of Metallica, but don’t be fooled: this is a movie soundtrack and it has several surprises scattered throughout the 16 tracks.Taking a look at the track listing, the first surprise that will jump out to hardcore fans is the fact that the band played ‘…And Justice For All.’ For the uninitiated, this is one of the most complex songs written by Metallica, and because of that they rarely play it live. In fact, it’s only been played a little more than 230 times since it first debuted on-stage in Budapest, Hungary on Sept. 11, 1988.Other surprises on the album come in the form of technical glitches. While it might sound strange, the surprises are actually very cool and add to the experience of ‘Metallica Through The Never’ being a movie soundtrack, rather than just a live album. The technical mishaps you hear on ‘Ride the Lightning’ and ‘Enter Sandman’ play significant roles in the plot of the film. During the latter song, frontman James Hetfield talks to the crowd and explains what is going on. “Two people got hurt up here but they will be OK,” he tells the crowd. “Can we get some lights up here to assess the damage, please? Should we keep playing?” And with that, the crowd goes nuts as Metallica tear into ‘Hit the Lights.’The last song on the two-disc soundtrack is the instrumental, ‘Orion.’ Played in an empty arena with no crowd cheering the band along, the song has a powerful, yet haunting feel to it. It’s the perfect performance to wrap up the soundtrack as it’s the same song that the band plays during the closing credits of the movie.Full of classic tracks like ‘Creeping Death’ and ‘Master of Puppets,’ with a few more recent tunes like ‘Fuel,’ ‘The Memory Remains’ and ‘Cyanide,’ the ‘Metallica Through The Never’ soundtrack is one of the best sounding live albums released in a long time, and might be the best ever released by Metallica. The only thing that might have taken this album to a new level is the inclusion of a new song; something to get fans ready for the next Metallica album, whenever that might be.Lars Ulrich‘s drums have never sounded better on a live recording, Kirk Hammett‘s solos pierce through your speakers and Robert Trujillo‘s thunderous bass hits you in your chest. All of that is complimented by Hetfield’s signature vocals and heavy guitar riffs. It’s mixed perfectly by Metallica soundman Greg Fidelman and is the essential companion to the movie.‘Metallica Through The Never’ is a fiery compilation that is full of heavy metal and a few surprises (don’t worry – we didn’t spoil all of them for you). Fans shouldn’t expect anything less from one of metal’s greatest bands." - Loudwire
    $7.00