Eidos

SKU: SR3075
Label:
Sensory Records
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Since the release of 2013’s In Crescendo, Kingcrow toured North America in support of Pain Of Salvation, and headlined a European tour.  Kingcrow kept busy in 2014, touring Europe with Fates Warning and at the same time crafting the material that would become Eidos.
“Eidos” is a new conceptual album about choices, consequences, dealing with regret and disillusion. Their earlier album Phlegethon dealt with childhood and In Crescendo about the end of youth.  Eidos can be considered the third part of a trilogy about the path of life. Musically it sees the band exploring new territories and pushing the extremes of its complex soundscape with a darker atmosphere and a more progressive attitude.

Describing the band today is quite a difficult task, but one could state that the influence of such artists as Porcupine Tree, Riverside, Opeth, Anathema, Radiohead , King Crimson and Massive Attack are all present in the music of Kingcrow.

With each release Kingcrow has taken a step further away from their original roots as a classic metal band and is now one of the most personal and exciting bands that Italy has to offer.

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  • Sometimes there are great albums that just float underneath everyone's radar.  Poor distribution, small label - or simply a band is just too far ahead of the curve for collector's to catch up.   Sooner or later they do.  That's just the nature of collecting music.  Such is the case of Sway.  Many years ago I stumbled across a copy of this obscure Italian album from 1973 and could not find any mention of it beyond one advanced collector mentioning "Oh yeah that's rare".  At the time there was little interest from the rock community in modal jazz, souljazz, space jazz, kosmigroov - whatever you want to call it.  Jazz collectors may well have been aware of the album but perhaps because the lineup consisted of relatively unknown (outside of Italy) musicians, no one really paid much attention to the album.  I did my fair share of turning friends and collectors on to the album.  Maybe it made a difference.  All I know is that finding a copy of the album now is next to impossible.So what the hell am I exactly talking about?  Sway is a quintet led by noted jazz pianist Sante Palumbo (he's still going today!).  The rest of the lineup consists of journeymen session players: Hugo Heredia (alto/tenor sax, flute), Sergio Farina (guitar), Marco Ratti (acoustic/electric bass), and Lino Liguori (drums/percussion).  If you are a fan of electric Miles Davis or Weather Report you must hear this album.Palumbo is the focal point of the band - his runs on acoustic and electric piano are breathtaking.  This guy can tear of the keys.  The music has that definite kosmigroov sound.  Electric piano plays off of wah-wah laced guitar, some nice skronking sax (and at times gorgeous, liquid flute) and a rock solid rhythmic foundation.  There are some parts to the album which have a slightly freer vibe but for the most part is quite accessible.  If you listen carefully you might hear strains of a sound that bears a kinship to Canterbury. New authorized reissue from Schema Records.  BUY OR DIE!
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  • "When Jethro Tull released Benefit in 1970, it signaled a new, more progressive musical direction for the English band. It also became one of the best-known albums of their career, which is going strong more 60 million records and 40 years later. The Grammy winning group is revisiting that pivotal album with a 2-CD/DVD-Audio collector s edition.The 2-CD/DVD collection comes loaded with a massive amount of music recorded by the band, which at the time featured: multi-instrumentalist frontman Ian Anderson, guitarist Martin Barre, drummer Clive Bunker, pianist John Evan, and bassist Glenn Cornick.The first disc contains the album s 10 original tracks, plus five bonus tracks that include both the U.K. and U.S. stereo versions of "Teacher. " All the songs are newly mixed by Steven Wilson and approved by Ian Anderson. The second disc includes newly remastered versions of rare tracks and singles recorded around the same time as Benefit, such as "Sweet Dream" in both stereo and mono.The audio-only DVD, which is available exclusively with this version, is packed with 58 tracks, including the album and bonus tracks in 5.1 surround sound. It also contains the U.K and U.S. versions of the album. The American version was sequenced differently and replaced the U.K. track "Alive and Well and Living In" with "Teacher. " In addition, the set also comes with a handsome booklet filled with rare photographs, an essay by Martin Webb, and interviews with band members."
    $28.00
  • "Aria is the second collaboration of ASIA founder Geoff Downes and singer/bass player John Payne. On Aria, John Payne’s voice is more powerful than ever and every single track is a massive thunderclap. As a special feature the Aria Special Edition contains the video for the song Anytime. The cover artwork was done by the legendary Roger Dean (Yes, Uriah Heep) and the album has been digitally remastered."
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  • Live performance recorded at Progfest in Los Angeles. Mix of material from Hybris and Epilog.
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  • 1978's Casino is considered by many to be the pinnacle of DiMeola's solo career but frankly I'm not sure how you can pick and chose. By now he had established his sound and stuck to his guns. A masterful display of musicianship.
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  • "From the moment the then still teenage Protest the Hero announced themselves to the world with their phenomenal debut record Kezia in 2006, the Whitby, Ontario quintet have been considered somewhat of a divisive force in the heavy music scene. Almost universally revered for their technical proficiency, but often misunderstood by casual listeners due to it, Protest the Hero have amassed an equal amount of fans as they have detractors for the spasmodic, genre-hopping nature of their compositions. Thankfully for the band, the fan base that they have acquired is a loyal, dedicated, and above all, passionate one. As a result of this, the band was able to finance their latest release, Volition, via the popular crowd funding service Indiegogo, and after repeated listens I can tell you that those fans are about to see their investment in Protest the Hero pay off big time.Volition, the band’s fourth full-length and first since 2011’s impressive, Scurrilous, is without a shadow of a doubt Protest the Hero’s best and most consistently mind-blowing release to date and it should see the band ascend to their rightful place amongst the upper-echelon of the progressive-metal scene. Opening with the barnstorming lead single, “Clarity,” a track that encapsulates all that is good about this band (soaring melodies, frantic shredding, earth shaking breakdowns and a rhythm section tighter than your metronome), Volition sets a cracking pace, grabbing the listener’s attention from the get-go and refusing to let go until it has had its way with you. It’s as if from the moment vocalist Rody Walker (channeling his best Sebastian Bach) screams, “Without a word uttered, a comparison is drawn,” your ears have been taken hostage by an evil musical overlord and your body has no choice but to nod along in reverence. And nod along you will as “Clarity” is followed in quick succession by the equally impressive “Drumhead Trial” and oh-so-appropriately titled “Tilting Against Windmills” (seriously TRY not windmilling to the sheer face-melting shred-fest taking place in this track) in an opening trilogy of stunning quality.With the albums modus-operandi in place, Protest the Hero continue the all-out sonic assault with the incendiary “Without Prejudice,” a piece of thrash driven metal majesty that highlights the thunderous groove provided by fill-in drummer Chris Adler (of Lamb of God fame) before letting up briefly to allow space for bassist Arif Mirabdolbagh to lay down one of the most impressive bass solos in recent memory. In fact, the rhythm section is simply stellar across the whole of Volition, with Mirabdolbagh’s talents being brought to the forefront unlike ever before, and Adler’s stick work undoubtedly causing many a Protest the Hero fan to bemoan the fact he is not sticking around as a permanent member — (the band has announced Mike Ieradi as a permanent replacement for the departed Moe Carlson).From this point onward Volition takes the listener on a bit of a journey through the most impressive elements of Protest the Hero’s past-works, incorporating their familiar genre-hopping habits as they effortlessly make the leap between the progressive-metal of “Yellow Teeth” into the punk-influenced “Plato’s Tripartite” and “Underbite,” through the more sprawling “Mist” and ferocious hardcore influence of “A Life Embossed” and “Animal Bones.” Considering the amount of sonic territory the band covers here they would be forgiven for losing or burying melody in the mix of all the technical proficiency, but it has to be said that the opposite is true, as it is arguably on these tracks that the melodic elements of Protest the Hero really shine.This is as much a testament to the work of the much-heralded guitar tandem of Luke Hoskin and Tim Millar as it is the input of Rody Walker, who it has to be said puts in his finest performance to date on Volition. Whether busting a nut in his trademark power metal howl on tracks such as “Clarity” and “Without Prejudice” or cutting loose with a guttural roar on the likes of “A Life Embossed” and “Animal Bones,” or crooning hauntingly in the outro of “Mist,” Walker absolutely nails it and this should be the album that puts the end to any criticism people might have about his unique vocal style. The lyrics are also much improved on previous outings, moving away for the more fantastical style of the band’s earlier works and instead occupying a middle ground between self-reflective introspection and intelligent social commentary, a maturation that blends superbly with the more rounded songwriting style displayed on the album.For their part, Hoskin and Millar put on a near-peerless display on Volition. From the opening tracks they display a rare ability to juxtapose beautiful melodic passages with breakneck riffing, all the while leaving themselves enough room to dazzle listeners with their rather unique take on all-out-shredfest. The end result of this slightly more thought out approach is that the solos actually stand out more, ensuring that although they are fewer in number than on previous albums, the ones that are there are spellbinding. Perhaps nowhere is this more evident than on album closer, “Skies,” a track that incorporates all of these elements into one of the most bat-shit-crazy tracks you will ever hear.As per usual with Protest the Hero, there are several guest appearances scattered across Volition, including the now traditional vocal contributions from folk singer Jadea Kelly on “Plato’s Tripartite” and “Yellow Teeth,” a track that also features violin from Raha Javanfar and guitar from Wyatt Shun. The absolute stand out of all of these guest appearances (there are too many to mention them all) however has to be the blistering solo contributed by Ron Jarzombek of Blotted Science on “Drumhead Trial” — it is seriously bordering on otherworldly what that guy is capable of doing with a guitar, and his contribution helps to take the track to another level of awesome.While I am conscious that I have thrown out a lot of superlatives in this review, this album is not the perfect progressive-metal release, there is times where the band still manage to get caught up in their own cleverness at the expense of the quality of the songs, but these moments are few and far between and Volition benefits greatly from the slightly more controlled approach the band has taken to crafting these songs.There is a lot of skepticism around about bands using crowdfunding to pay for the recording process, but if bands back up their fans’ investment by producing the best record of their career like Protest the Hero have done with Volition, then the music industry may have found its best business model yet. Seriously go out and buy it. You won’t regret it." - Under The Gun
    $14.00