D_letion (Digipak)

SKU: AMCDAG04
Label:
Aesperus Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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The band's second album finds them seeking their own identity. There is still a Porcupine Tree vibe but its much less overt. Keyboards are definitely not in the forefront - this is a guitar driven effort with lots of crunch, distortion, and a schmearing of grunge. Good stuff!!

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:54
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0
I was a little surprised at the direction taken on this release in comparison from the last album: "Selling Insincerity"...Even though the last relase had many similarities to Porcupine Tree's/Steven Wilson's trademark sound (which is a great band to base a bands frame work from, don't get me wrong!) it still had a certain appealing flow, where as this new disc just didn't reach out and grab me by the ears at all like it's predessor...That said the first, third and Fourth track on the D_letion release are quite well crafted. Maybe on the next release AG will pick up where they left off on "Selling Insincerity" as they definitly had some magic there.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:54
Rate: 
0
Even better than the first; although, thankfully, the S.Wilson traits still show. Sneak Peek could have come right off of Stupid Dream. and Black Lace doesn't need any medecimal help in getting one aroused. mw
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:54
Rate: 
0
I was a little surprised at the direction taken on this release in comparison from the last album: "Selling Insincerity"...Even though the last relase had many similarities to Porcupine Tree's/Steven Wilson's trademark sound (which is a great band to base a bands frame work from, don't get me wrong!) it still had a certain appealing flow, where as this new disc just didn't reach out and grab me by the ears at all like it's predessor...That said the first, third and Fourth track on the D_letion release are quite well crafted. Maybe on the next release AG will pick up where they left off on "Selling Insincerity" as they definitly had some magic there.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:54
Rate: 
0
Even better than the first; although, thankfully, the S.Wilson traits still show. Sneak Peek could have come right off of Stupid Dream. and Black Lace doesn't need any medecimal help in getting one aroused. mw
You must login or register to post reviews.
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