Dimensionaut

SKU: 0653-2
Label:
Inside Out
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Sound Of Contact is a new band put together by Simon Collins and session keyboardist Dave Kerzner.  Yeah - Simon is Phil's son.  The apple doesn't fall far from the tree - Simon plays drums and he also sings.  His voice is eerily like his dad.  At times virtually indistinguishable.  The music follows a similar path to Phil's work with Genesis and solo.  Parts of the album are pure prog - in fact the album closes with a killer 19 minute epic called "Mobius Slip".  Other parts of the album exhibit a poppier more commercial side.  I don't think of the album as a pop album - its a prog rock album.  Kerzner provides some very interesting keyboard work - lots of intricacies through out the album.  There is that commercial element that reminds me of Genesis in the 80s.  With his voice sounding so much like his father, Simon will always be cursed with being compared to Phil.  That's a fact.  Overall I think he's come up with an interesting album that fans of more contemporary progressive rock will enjoy.

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  • Third and final album from this Greek band led by Vangelis and Demi Roussos is one of the great prog masterpieces of all time. 666 is one of the most controversial albums in prog rock history. Originally conceived as a much larger work (rumored to be 4LPs worth), the band worked on it for 2 years with it ultimately seeing light of day as a double album release in 1972. By this point in time the band had already broken up. The album was composed by Vangelis, with the text written by Costas Ferris. The album deals with the Book Of Revelations and it's one that thematically will chill you to the bone. The music features the extraordinary psychedelic guitar work of Silver Kolouris and of course Vangelis' great keyboard work. Irene Papas' guest appearance on vocals will give you shivers. Plenty of Greek ethnic vibes abound. This is one of those albums you write about on and on - it has to be heard to be believed. A masterpiece that should be firmly imbedded in any prog collection. File under: AMAZING!
    $20.00
  • 2nd album from this classic Canterbury band."Featuring some of the most stunning musicianship ever associated with England's Canterbury scene, Hatfield and the North's second LP features, like their eponymous debut, Dave Stewart on keyboards, Phil Miller on guitar, Richard Sinclair on bass and vocals, and Pip Pyle on drums (supplemented by a few guest instrumentalists and the ever-ethereal Northettes with their "la la" backing vocals). The participants show an admirable sense of restraint and, like their Canterbury peers, are careful to avoid the pomposity and bombast of better-known prog rockers of the era, such as Emerson, Lake & Palmer and Yes. The Hatfields' convoluted instrumental passages segue into the occasional Sinclair vocal vehicle, in which the exemplary bassist sings in a polite and mellow croon that utterly avoids melismatic displays, histrionics, or over-emoting; in other words, his style -- closer to, say, Bing Crosby than, say, Joe Cocker -- would likely cause many 21st century pop music listeners to scratch their heads with bemusement. And the songs' rather whimsical lyrical content, while perhaps another conscious attempt to steer clear of the pretentiousness of the typically overbearing prog rock song style, certainly reflects a '60s/'70s mindset more than a 21st century one, so today's jaded listeners should realign their expectations. Things get off to a strong start with "Share It," a catchy little number with Sinclair expressing some idealistic and hard-to-criticize Brit hippie sentiments. Elsewhere, the "songs" are few and far between, but crop up in odd spots nevertheless; the Hatfields were masters of the segue and the most masterly demonstrations of instrumental technique wind up bleeding into ditties that might seem out of place to some.But Stewart, Miller, Sinclair, and Pyle all make wonderful instrumental statements. Particularly noteworthy are Miller's two short jazzy numbers, "Lounging There Trying" and "Underdub," which, with their sparkling electric piano work from Stewart, have a light and airy improvisational feel despite rather thorough scoring; Pyle's propulsive "Yes No Interlude" with its furious melding of Stewart's keyboards and the sax of guest Jimmy Hastings; and Stewart's 20-minute opus "Mumps." The latter is particularly impressive, with everything anyone would want from an extended-form Canterbury-style workout. The piece ebbs and flows through nimbly executed thematic passages and variations, featuring one of Stewart's most compelling themes and also one of the best fuzz organ solos that he (or Mike Ratledge or David Sinclair for that matter) ever recorded. Smack dab in the middle of it all, another Sinclair-sung tune arrives, this time making punning use of letters of the alphabet. But the suite gets back on track with a dramatic instrumental coda, melding spacy effects, more great organ playing from Stewart, and spectacularly executed unison lines from Miller and Hastings in crescendo before the final fade. The Virgin Records CD reissue features several live bonus tracks (also found on the Afters compilation), including two comparatively crazed and heavy Miller instrumental pieces recorded in France and, from a date at the Rainbow Theatre in London, Sinclair's "Halfway Between Heaven and Earth," which has a bit more of the feel of his vocal work with Caravan than with the Hatfields. Too bad there's a premature fadeout during another great Stewart organ solo. One wonders where the band was headed with that."
    $9.00
  • Italian sideproject of Runaway Totem is even closer to the Magma sound.
    $16.00
  • We are a little late with this one (ok...a couple of years late). Leverage have bounced around labels but hopefully have found a long term home with Spinefarm. High quality melodic metal with proggy touches. Seems like these guys should be jumping up a level in popularity. The idea behind Circus Colossus was sounding big and serious. Not that the band wasn't serious before, but there was always that "underground, little band"-charm to them that they're very eager to get rid of. They want to get into the big game with the top dogs, but not by becoming radio friendly, and they're pretty much playing their cards right at this point. There are several changes to the band's sound. The production is a lot better (not that it was shaggy before though) and it amplifies the arena quality that some of their tracks have. There are symphonic elements added with great taste, and instead of a fast rocker we've got an instrumental intro to open the album. The quantity and content of the ballads, one of their trademarks, has changed. There's the short "Don't Keep Me Waiting" stripped down to piano and voice (it's written by their drummer, who also does their album covers), and as a bonus song, one of the best power ballads ever written, "Walk On Home" (how many power ballads with deep, storytelling lyrics can you name anyway?). Also, the band takes a break from grim overtones and hard-hitting harmonies by adding two very light and upbeat songs, "Rider Of Storm" and "Revelation." Though the changes may be numerous, the essential Leverage elements remain - heavy riffs (as demonstrated on "Worldbeater"), songs that ooze with catchy elements and yet don't lack quality ("Wolf And The Moon"), great guitar work courtesy of gentlemen Heikkinen and Spoof, fast tracks that hit you right in the heart ("Prisoners", "Broken Wings"), and wonderful vocals by Pekka Heino. They continue on the path of playing good quality, melody and harmony-based music heavy rock stripped of cheese. And they're doing pretty great." - Metal Storm
    $16.00
  • This Swedish doomsters does an uncanny job of channeling 70s dark hard rock sounds.  Black Sabbath comes to mind instantly and you'll hear some similarities to bands like Pentagram and Candlemass.  This time around they have opened up their sound a bit - I distinctly hear more than a little bit of Zep inscribed in their genome.  Highly recommended.
    $13.00
  • Fourth album from this Finnish epic power metal band heavily inspired by Tolkein's Lord Of The Rings.
    $7.00
  • Essential third album from the Mwandishi band. A pure kosmigroov classic in which the ensemble touches on African based rhythms and electric fusion. Hancock and Patrick Gleeson somehow integrate a battery of electric keyboards into the jazz realm but in a way that was organic and seems just about right. A must own.
    $5.00
  • Third album from this 21st Century supergroup of Joe Bonnamassa, Glenn Hughes, Jason Bonham, and Derek Sherinian.  Well crafted bluesy hard rock.
    $17.00
  • October Equus are one of the more interesting bands on the so-called "avant-prog" scene.  Their music has a dark energy that often evokes the spirit of Present and King Crimson.  A lot of this is due to the angular stylings of guitarist/leader Angel Ontalva.  The clarinet, sax and keys infuse jazz rock elements.  This is their complete live performance at the R.I.O. Festival 2014.  Apparently this was a controversial performance among the attendees.  Not sure why.  Listening to this I hear a band burning with fire.
    $13.00
  • Excellent US neoprog that will appeal to fans of Marillion and Iluvatar.
    $3.00
  • First time on CD. Chaos Out Of Order is the first full length release from the Michigan prog band.  It was originally released in 1988.  At the time Matthew Parmenter and Co were quite young and broke.  The album was originally a cassette only release.  Matthew cleaned this up just a little bit and tacked on an long track from 1987 called "Peacemaker".  Its a concept album and you can tell its Discipline - there are the prog moves - but it isn't quite as fleshed out as later works.  Content wise I find this much more preferable to Push And Profit.  
    $13.00
  • "After a year of personal and personnel problems, the Allman Brothers Band got back together to record the surprisingly consistent live-in-the-studio venture Where It All Begins. It lacks the ambition and stretch of Seven Turns or Shades of Two Worlds, along with their peaks, but it is still a solidly consistent album, driven by some of the virtues of live spontaneity. Highlights include Gregg Allman's frank drug song "All Night Train," the Bo Diddley-beat-driven "No One to Run With," and the glorious dual-guitar workout "Back Where It All Begins."" - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Limited edition boxed set, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the classic King Crimson album Larks' Tongues in Aspic: 13CDs, 1DVD-A, 1Blu-Ray in 12” box with booklet and memorabilia. DVD-A featuring 5.1 new surround mix, original and new stereo mixes in hi-res stereo, a full album of alt mixes by Steven Wilson and more than 30 minutes of unseen footage of the band live in the studio. Blu-Ray content as per DVD-A with further hi-res stereo material – all presented in DTS Master audio, 4CDs of studio content including CD of session reels featuring the first recorded takes of all pieces on the album, 1CD live in the studio, 8CDs of live audio restored bootlegs and soundboard recordings plus a 36 page booklet with an extensive new interview with Robert Fripp, notes by King Crimson biographer Sid Smith, album sleeve print, concert ticket replica (with code for further concert download) and band photo postcards.
    $149.00
  • "In what seemed like an eternity since the details on the second Darkology album surfaced in December 2013, the running joke was that the second album should be renamed “Fated to Never Be Released.” “Official leaks” of demo tracks surfaced ahead of a European tour “in support of the album” (and without Carptenter who had other commitments). The demos only served to deepen fan desire for the release, as they revealed vocalist Kelly Sundown Carpenter (ex-Firewind live, Adagio) absolutely KILLING IT with a sharpened buzz saw edge that makes Ripper Owens look like an absolute chump. Flash forward to 2015 and finally a release date through Prime Eon and/or Nightmare (depending on where you live) would happen in late Spring. Was it all worth the wait, agony and hype? You betcha it was.The album is a steamroller from start to finish – with some parts here and there that tend to drift slightly (the title track for one) – but it never disappoints. As evidenced in the demos, Carpenter proves why he should be a vocalist in demand as he drives home the heaviness with his ultra-sharp brilliant delivery. Unlike most singers who like to live in the rafters, Kelly pulls it off with zero annoyance. His shredding high end is absolutely essential given the musical assault of riffs (from the great Michael Harris of Thought Chamber) and pounding rhythms (from bassist Michael Neal and drummer Brian Harris) that back it up. Though not similar in style per se as total impact, “Fated to Burn” gives me the same feel as the first time I heard Winter’s Bane’s “Heart of a Killer” and Sanctuary’s “Refuge Denied,” where the first blush with both the young Ripper Owens and Warrell Dane were absolutely life changing. If you add a little dose of “Breaker” era Accept and a tiny drop of Symphony X you have just the tip of just how brilliant “Fated to Burn” truly is.The Harris brothers have struck upon an exciting formula of U.S. power and traditional with just a touch of progressive. In terms of comparison with 2009’s “Altered Reflections,” this album packs five times the punch and power, sure to please fans that prefer metal heavy, guitar driven, and with shredding vocals. The album is a flurry of amazing grinding riffs with Kelly’s lethal vox that make tracks like “Shadows of Oth,” “Quantum Genocide,” “Kill Me If You Can,” “21st Century Frankenstein (Nobot 2)” and personal favorite “Festival of Fear” sound, and in many ways exceed, “Painkiller.” In fact, Darkology is a Metal Church for a new generation – and “Fated to Burn” leaves such an indelible vibe of “The Dark” that I swear the spirit of circa-1986 David Wayne seems to have implanted itself inside of Kelly.In one of the most exciting and pure metal releases in well over a decade, “Fated to Burn” is well worth the wait. Darkology stakes its claim in a busy circuit and with one flap of burning wings created an album that can easily be labeled an instant classic, thus raising its stock as one of the best U.S. bands out there today. This isn’t a mere claim only to be dashed away by a short time – this is the real deal! If you call yourself a fan of metal than heed these words….”Fated to Burn” lives up to and exceeds any hype you may have for it. If you haven’t familiarized yourself with the band, then you picked the right time, because the album isn’t “fated to burnout” anytime soon. Darkology has arrived.Highs: One of the best pure metal albums in a decade, Kelly Sundown Carpenter shines.Lows: Some songs drift a little, but not by much.Bottom line: Darkology strikes back with an album that is "Fated to Burn" into the memory for a long long time." - Metal Underground
    $16.00