Decipher (2CD)

SKU: TMD-069
Label:
Transmission Records
Category:
Gothic Metal
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Produced by Stephen van Haestregt (Within Temptation, Ambeon). Additional production & mix by Oscar Holleman (Ayreon, Krezip, Within Temptation) at Studio RS29, Waalwijk, The Netherlands.

What can you possibly do when you released the most sensational Metal debut of the year 2000? Actually it’s quite simple. You have a repeat performance of swaggering grooves on the next album as well.

Decipher doesn’t politely draw your attention – it simply grabs you by the throat. Even more so than on Prison Of Desire the classical orchestra and choir and the more than impressive sound of the band itself have been forged together at superhuman temperatures. As a result the “Heavenly” elements appear to have embraced the scorching hellfire amalgamating into a fascinating alloy.

For almost sixty minutes the flawless soprano of singer Floor Jansen reverberates the blaze of the ferocious nether world, which forms the breeding ground of the unconventional songs on the album. A world that abundantly proves that After Forever has grown. In every aspect.

After Forever sounds as After Forever!

DeLuxe 2CD Set in Digipack, Original Album & Artwork, Extensive Booklet,
31 Remastered Tracks = 11 tracks Original Album + 20 Bonus Tracks,
over 150 minutes of Gothic Metal!
Non-Album Tracks, Unreleased Versions, Sessions & Demo’s.
featuring: Mark Jansen: EPICA, Sander Gommans: HDK & Trillium and Arjen AYREON Lucassen.
The original Dechiper album sold over 120.000 copies.
Liner notes by Sander Gommans

Track listing

TMD-069 AFTER FOREVER – Decipher: The Album - The Sessions

Chapter 1 -  Decipher: The Album
1. Ex Cathedra 2:02 -Ouverture-
2. Monolith of Doubt 3:31
3. My Pledge of Allegiance #1 6:25 -The Sealed Fate-
4. Emphasis 4:18 
5. Intrinsic 6:44
6. Zenith 4:21
7. Estranged 6:55 - A Timeless Spell-
8. Imperfect Tenses 4:08 - duet
9. My Pledge of Allegiance #2 5:07 -The Tempted Fate-
10. The Key 4:47
11. Forlorn Hope 6:21

Bonus Tracks
12. For The Time Being 5:04
13. Who wants to Live Forever 4:48 – feat Ayreon
14. Imperfect Tenses 4:10 – duet with Damian Wilson
15. Monolith of Doubt 3:32 – Single Version
16. Imperfect Tenses 4:06 – Orchestral Version

Chapter 2 – Decipher: The Sessions
1. The Key 4:42
2. Monolith of Doubt 3:31
3. My Pledge of Allegiance #2 5:02
4. Emphasis 4:17
5. Estranged 6:53
6. My Pledge of Allegiance #1 6:20
7. Imperfect Tenses 4:05 (vocals Floor only)
8. For the Time Being 5:02
9. Forlorn Hope 6:20
10. Zenith 4:18
11. Intrinsic 6:56
12. Who wants to Live Forever 4:48 (Ayreon only)
13. Monolith of Doubt 3:43 – Demo
14. Emphasis 4:30 - Demo
15. For The Time Being 5:09 – Demo

REMASTERED IN THE 24-BIT DOMAIN FROM THE ORIGINAL MASTERS

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