Cured (Remastered)

SKU: 0094638441526
Label:
Virgin/Charisma
Category:
Progressive Rock
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NEW REMASTERED EDITION PACKED WITH BONUS TRACKS!!

This one is a it or miss effort. Pete Hicks was gone by this point and Mr. Hackett took over on vocals to mixed results. Essentialy the album consists of Steve Hackett and Nick Magnus with some of the usual names guesting. There are some monster tracks like "The Air-Conditioned Nightmare" but overall there is a commercial gloss to the disc. Remastered version with three bonus tracks and fresh liner notes from Steve. Recommended with reservations.

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