Clockwork Angels Tour (3CD)

SKU: 1686-175982
Label:
Roadrunner Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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""RUSH: CLOCKWORK ANGELS TOUR" was filmed and recorded last November at the American Airlines Arena in Dallas, Texas, during Rush's highly successful Clockwork Angels Tour. The eleven month-marathon world tour crossed North America twice and ventured overseas to Europe in support of the band's acclaimed 2012 studio release "CLOCKWORK ANGELS."

In capturing the tour's electrifying three hour set, "RUSH: CLOCKWORK ANGELS TOUR" pairs Rush classics ("Tom Sawyer," "The Spirit Of Radio," "2112"), with a nod to the 80's Rush era (The Analog Kid," "Territories," "Subdivisions") alongside newly reworked arrangements specifically for the tour featuring the Clockwork Angels String Ensemble ("Headlong Flight," "YYZ," "Red Sector A"). The string section marks the first time the trio has brought additional musicians on the road with them. To showcase their latest studio release, the epic set list also features nine tracks off "CLOCKWORK ANGELS." Other highlights include tracks rarely performed and never before recorded live ("The Body Electric," "Middletown Dreams"), in addition to three separate drum solos by the incomparable Neil Peart."

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    $6.00
  • "Sometimes you have to wonder… why do Ulver albums still get reviewed on metal blogs? After all, the band themselves haven’t had a shred of “metal” in them for a long time.Still, there’s a connection – and it’s more than just nostalgia or a sense of obligation due to the band’s “seminal” early years.I know quite a lot of metal fans who love the strange, otherworldy music that Ulver make, but don’t really have anything else even vaguely similar in their music collections.I think, ultimately, what draws people in, and what makes them stay with the band through all their digressions and deviations, is the boundless (stubborn, even) sense of artistic integrity they display. From poppy exuberance to dark psychedelia, they are a band who embrace, and revel in, contradiction. Each of their albums is simultaneously daring and difficult, challenging yet compelling, filled with a warmth of emotion yet governed by a calculating intellect.And Messe I.X-VI.X is no different, in that regard.Characteristically for the band, it’s an album of contradictions, eclectic elements woven together in perfect (dis)harmony, part avant-garde electronic expressionism, part organic classical composition.As they themselves say, “Much of this was recorded live, yet it is not a live album. We’ve spent long hours in the studio translating what happened that night”.Again – contradiction. The music here is the result of a pre-planned composition, performed live, then re-translated in the studio. Both dynamic and controlled. Calculated, but with the potential for chaos.Despite its seemingly contradictory nature, the struggling symbiosis between the organic and the electronic, each song on the album – each a movement in the grand ballet of sound and symbolism – has its place and purpose.Unusually (and perhaps once again re-affirming the contradictory nature of the band), it’s almost 25 minutes before we hear the first sound of Kristoffer Rygg’s magnificent singing voice, on the solemn “Son of Man”. Yet that’s not to say the album is an instrumental one. To call it that would be a mistake. It’s threaded through with a multiplicity of voices. It’s just that few of them issue from a human throat.Case in point, the lengthy and sombre orchestration of “As Syrians Pour In, Lebanon Battles With The Ghosts of a Bloody Past” uses its many instruments as voices, melodies rising and falling like phantom choirs of unseen angels. Above a moaning undertow of gloomy synths and soundscapes, the hiss and sigh and soft flutter of strings speaks with a universal tongue, cold foreboding building towards haunting rapture.In contrast “Shri Schneider” is the conscious antithesis of this, a sci-fi soundtrack of psychedelic electronica which pushes the subtle wailing of strings into the background, natural nuance giving way to artificial artistry.“Glamour Box (Ostinati)” brings the two together, first quietly – as the electronic elements twist the strings just so, and the orchestra respond in kind by moulding pulsing electronic rhythms into fluid forms – then louder, ebbing and flowing with a digital heartbeat so that the divide between the organic and the inorganic sounds becomes almost imperceptible.The aforementioned “Son of Man” makes full use of Kristoffer Rygg’s plaintive vocals – albeit only for the barest of minutes –  using them sparingly to set the scene for a Hans Zimmer-esque orchestral offering, cut through with an undercurrent of simmering electronic tension, building into a glorious fountain of emotion, loss and longing, and quiet desperation.“Noche Oscura Del Alma” is an oddity, waves of alien distortion cascading across a tapestry of low, rumbling, augmented strings. Its strange, cybernetic orchestration soon opens up into a piece of oddly disturbing ambience and unsettling atmospherics. Digital thunder crashes and symphonic shadows loom, as strange samples and broken shards of avant-jazz flit in and out of perception. It’s almost nightmarish, yet fits within the dreamscape atmosphere of the album.After this, “Mother of Mercy” is like a balm to the soul, as Kristoffer Rygg’s soulful voice returns once more, wrapped in a soft shroud of weeping strings. Subtle synths slowly make their presence known, introducing unexpected trip-hop beats that flicker and fade almost as quickly as they appear. As the song progresses, this soothing harmony of sound is distorted and disturbed, the translation of live organic sounds into digital expression slowly stripping away its warmth until, finally, entropy conquers…Messe I.X-VI.X truly is an album of contradictions – both modern and medieval, peaceful, yet agitated. It’s an album about love, and about the fear that engenders. Or it’s an album about fear, and the toll it takes on love. I’m not quite sure yet.The band state that “Shadows reverberates – It feels like a companion piece.” And I agree with them. It’s a similarly powerful experience, and one that demands a certain level of patience and openness from the listener to fully appreciate.If the stark minimalism of Wars of the Roses was in many ways a reaction to the languid, organic warmth and life of Shadows, then Messe must surely be its ghost, a haunting shade that follows after, as the night which comes with the setting of the sun. Where our dreams dwell and our fears linger." - No Clean Singing 
    $14.00
  • The band was heavily tied in with pop singer Lucio Battisti. Second album shows a bit more in the prog direction. Under rated band.
    $15.00
  • Domestic jewelbox pressing with one bonus track."It’s always the highlight of my year when I discover a new “Who’s Who” of heavy metal, all-star line-up releasing a full-length album. Sometimes, they can really flop, sounding nearly identical to one of the member’s bands, like nothing at all has changed, and only release one album – maybe two. That being said however, some of these all-star mash-ups end up creating a freight train of hard-hitting heavy metal that doesn’t seem to be slowing down any time soon. Sometimes they succeed in seemingly blending the influence from each member so perfectly that an entirely new and original sound comes soaring out of your speakers. Enter Ashes of Ares, the new project of ex-Iced Earth and Nevermore members, forming in 2012 and preparing the release of their debut, self-titled full-length in September.Fronting the band is truly a name that needs no introduction (though I plan to give one anyway), Matt Barlow. Despite the mile long “past members” list for American heavy metal band Iced Earth, Barlow fronted the band for the majority of their career thus far, boasting one of the most original and most recognized voices in American metal. He left the band, along with bassist (turned guitarist) Freddie Vidales in 2012 to focus on other acts, particularly Ashes of Ares. Joined by ex-Nevermore drummer, Van Williams, Ashes of Ares proves to live up to the destructive, war-drenched name the band has been given.The album runs up and down like a roller coaster from straight up thrashing, in your face American metal, to a more toned down and melodic side to the artists. It’s easy to hear the influence of all of the member’s past bands, yet they each definitely brought some new songwriting to the table. “The Messenger” opens the album up with a mellow and melodic guitar line, featuring Barlow’s insanely haunting, layered vocals. The chills immediately travel up my spine, right up until the song really kicks into gear. Moving on throughout the album, tracks “On Warriors Wings” and “This is My Hell” feature great groove, showcasing beautiful melodies and harmonies left and right between Barlow’s voice and the guitar lines. Meanwhile, the drum parts remain simple yet constructive, especially in “This is My Hell” where they are responsible for pushing along this musical tension, building-up to the song’s liberation. The falsetto vocal touches in this song really push it over the top for me, and it is easily my favorite moment on the album.While there are some tracks that get somewhat repetitive and lose my interest, the album redeems itself with “Chalice of Man” that hits hard and doesn’t let up. Immediately following is the album’s ballad-like moment, “The Answer”. Barlow soars above the music in the beginning, but the distorted guitar and bass lines answer quickly and the song picks up into a great tune. The lyrics are seriously emotional and heart-felt, which definitely isn’t lacking on the album (see “What I Am”), but it really sticks out on this song specifically. The slower tempo fits Barlow’s pipes perfectly, and the layered harmonies are flawless.As a whole, the album moves along unbelievably fast, despite the few tracks that do get repetitive. The songs are so creatively arranged, topped off with the god-like vocals of Matt Barlow, I really don’t see how anyone could pass up on this record. Right now, they have “Dead Man’s Plight” as a lyric video (see below), along with snippets of “The Messenger” and “The One Eyed King” on YouTube. If I still haven’t persuaded you on the music, have at it!I beg you to check out this new, unbelievable legacy that these men are creating! It will not disappoint!" - Metalholic
    $6.00
  • "The German band DAWN OF DESTINY is formed in 2005 by Jens Faber. “Praying To The World” is their fourth full length album released through Phonotraxx Records. A wonderful Power Metal album with Thrash, Death and Gothic influences that contains 15 songs and that does last longer than 75 minutes, making me feel lucky to have picked this album to review, simply because I just loved this album.DAWN OF DESTINY is not the first band that did step into the world of Power Metal and without doubt they won’t be the last one and even though “Praying To The World” contains the familiar Power Metal sound, it also contains other influences. However the way the other  influence are mixed in gives this album an almost magical sound, showing a world filled with fast moving adventure, the good, the bad and miracles, but with roots inside reality and lots of energy to share with the listener.The main energy behind “Praying To The World” did catch my attention right from the beginning, simply because it shines through every song on the album. Energy that’s strong and moving even during the slower parts, making this album a perfect travel partner for those who are on their way with any kind of transportation vehicle, but this album’s also a great listen while taking a long walk.DAWN OF DESTINY did put down an awesome album with skilled players in a tight teamwork spirit. The bass, drum, guitar and keyboard players are able to create different spheres perfectly, but so does the vocalists on this album. Just love the way DAWN OF DESTINY combines different kind of vocals beautifully together on their album “Praying To The World”. They combined clear high and low vocals with easy to follow growling and grunts, able to touch much more than just the beauty and the beast. Giving this album an extra dimension and with that an extra touch. I’m happy to have bumped into DAWN OF DESTINY with their album “Praying To The World”." - Metal Temple
    $15.00
  • "1981's Mob Rules was the second Black Sabbath album to feature vertically challenged singer Ronnie James Dio, whose powerful pipes and Dungeons and Dragons lyrics initially seemed like the perfect replacement for the recently departed and wildly popular Ozzy Osbourne. In fact, all the ingredients which had made their first outing, Heaven and Hell, so successful are re-utilized on this album, including legendary metal producer Martin Birch (Deep Purple, Whitesnake, etc.) and supporting keyboard player Geoff Nichols. And while it lacks some of its predecessor's inspired songwriting, Mob Rules was given a much punchier, in-your-face mix by Birch, who seemed re-energized after his work on New Wave of British Heavy Metal upstarts Iron Maiden's Killers album. Essentially, Mob Rules is a magnificent record, with the only serious problem being the sequencing of the material, which mirrors Heaven and Hell's almost to a tee. In that light, one can't help but compare otherwise compelling tracks like "Turn Up the Night" and "Voodoo" to their more impressive Heaven and Hell counterparts, "Neon Knights" and "Children of the Sea." That streak is soon snapped, first by the unbelievably heavy seven-minute epic "The Sign of the Southern Cross," which delivers one of the album's best moments, then its segue into an unconventional synthesizer-driven instrumental ("E5150") and the appearance of the roaring title track. Side two is less consistent, hiding the awesome "Falling off the Edge of the World" (perhaps the most overlooked secret gem to come from the Dio lineup) amongst rather average tracks like "Slipping Away" and "Over and Over." Over the next year, the wheels fell off for Black Sabbath, and Dio's exit marked Mob Rules as the last widely respected studio release of the band's storied career." - Allmusic Guide
    $6.00
  • "Deluxe two CD + DVD Edition. 2013 live release from the Tampa, Florida-based Heavy Metal outfit. Since Dystopia was released in October of 2011, Iced Earth has been on the attack in a big way, playing more shows in the past year than in the previous 10 years...combined! Early on in the World Tour the band decided that they wanted to capture this newfound energy and passion on film and tape. When the offer came in to film at the ancient Kourion Theater in Limassol, Cyprus, they were immediately attracted to that idea. The history and culture there, as well as the Cypriot audience, which the band experienced in December 2011, solidified the decision to record in Cyprus. Filming and recording a 2 1/2 hour show in an amphitheater that is 6000 years old and is not set-up for a Rock concert, paired with 40-degree Celsius heat, were just some of the obstacles to overcome. But the finished product makes up for any of the challenges that the band and crew faced on that special night."
    $16.00
  • Its been some time since Michael Harris' Thought Chamber project made its debut.  The band consists of Michael Harris (guitars), Ted Leonard (vocals), Bill Jenkins (keys), Jeff Plant (bass), and Mike Haid (drums).  Ted Leonard and Bill Jenkins will be familiar to you from their membership in Enchant (Ted is also fronting Spock's Beard now).Psykerion is a sci-fi cybermetal concept album.  Harris plays with a lot of restraint compared to some of his solo albums.  In fact I would classify it as tasteful.  Leonard is one of the best vocalists in prog and he doesn't disappoint.  Lots of solos flying around on guitar and keys but it maintains a melodic integrity through out.  Hopefully we don't have to wait another 7 years for the follow up.  Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • "Aja was cool, relaxed, and controlled; it sounded deceptively easy. Its follow-up, Gaucho, while sonically similar, is its polar opposite: a precise and studied record, where all of the seams show. Gaucho essentially replicates the smooth jazz-pop of Aja, but with none of that record's dark, seductive romance or elegant aura. Instead, it's meticulous and exacting; each performance has been rehearsed so many times that it no longer has any emotional resonance. Furthermore, Walter Becker and Donald Fagen's songs are generally labored, only occasionally reaching their past heights, like on the suave "Babylon Sisters," "Time Out of Mind," and "Hey Nineteen." Still, those three songs are barely enough to make the remainder of the album's glossy, meandering fusion worthwhile." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • This is one of the better prog rock albums I've heard to come out of Germany in some time. Second album from Invertigo is modern sounding - I guess this is what neoprog has evolved into. Normally I don't go for this sort of thing but its really well done progressive rock that occasionally touches on an old school vibe. Fans of Sylvan will go nuts for this band. Check out the 22 minute closer "The Memoirs Of A Mayfly" - some nice echoes of The Flower Kings and Genesis creep in. If you are into a more contemporary progressive rock sound there's a good chance you'll find this one essential and probably one of your favs for 2012.
    $15.00
  • "A new stunning 2CD Live audio release from the reigning kings of Progressive Rock. Featuring special guest Pat Mastelotto (King Crimson, Mr Mister) Recorded at De Boerderij in Holland 2007 Roine Stolt, Tomas Bodin, Pat Mastelotto, Jonas Reingold, Hasse Fröberg."Live in The Netherlands 2007 Disc 1: 83 minutes Disc 2: 64 minutes Total Running Time 143 minutesDigipak and 20-pages bookletSetlist:1. Love is the only answer2. There is more to this world3. Retropolis4. Trading my soul5. Hudson river sirens call6. I am the sun7. Life in motion8. Brimstone flight 9999. Babylon10. Stardust we are11. What if god was alone12. Blade of Cain13. Sum of no reason
    $17.00
  • Remastered limited edition of the third album from this British neoprog band. Comes with two bonus track cut in 2010.
    $16.00
  • US/Italian progressive power metal fronted by a vocalist with amazing skills (and very long hair!).
    $14.00
  • This one is a little bit of a head scratcher.  Alithia comes at you from all angles so its kind of hard to clearly define a categorization for them.  The band calls their style "astral space core".  Hmmm...Alithia are an Australian band with a connection to Hungary.  The album was produced in Hungary and there are a number of guest musicians from around the world.  I'm not familiar with the producer Sandor Daniel but he's certainly created an epic sound.  The music has a modern psychedelic feel but there is also a weird art rock element at play here.  Plenty of contemporary proggy moments as well.One thing is for certain - they can create one hell of a video.  Check this out and it will give you a good sense of what to expect."The resurgence of progressive rock in Australia continues to build, led by the likes of Karnivool, Dead Letter Circus and Breaking Orbit, and underpinned by a solid base of lesser known acts from all around Australia. Melbourne band AlithiA released their first full length, To the Edge of Time earlier this year and with it have found a much more consistent definition to their sound.One of the first things that strikes you is the distinctly European flavour of their songs, with exceptional smoothness, drama and sense of occasion. It’s solid, but not intensely heavy going with its wings spending most of the album fully spread as it soars on the currents of air it creates. AlithiA still know how to ramp it up and make use of discord and variation in pace, slowing it right down in Sacrifice before soaring skyward once more. It’s how they build those rising currents with the subtle but complex layers that makes it feel so effortless. There’s no passage that grates, or feels overdone or incomplete or cheesy as they buck the trend toward bringing everything to the front of the mix, and stick with vocals up front, supported by a wall of sound and occasional flourishes and solos when the singer takes a break.That’s not to say the wall of sound is white noise, and should you choose to you can still pick out individual instruments and follow them, so clear is the production. The violin in ‘Here I Am’, the gaida in ‘Thirteen Revelation’, the piano in ‘The Veil’ – none of these dominate yet they become an identifying feature of the song they appear in.There’s some great use of melody, although opener ‘Thirteen Revelations’ lacks one clear phrase that becomes synonymous with the song. This is partly due to the length and the diversity of the song – it runs for 12 minutes and pushes ahead the whole way introducing new melodies and riffs as it goes rather than returning to earlier themes. Still, it doesn’t feel too disjointed or aimless because the transitions run so smoothly together. For the rest of the songs though there are immediately recognizable melodies that clearly identify each song.AlithiA create a strong sense of ebb and flow that carries over to the feel of the record as a whole. Albums that run almost an hour can hit flat spots, but not here, and their solid grasp of how to finish off a song also extends to how to end an album.Given the strong Central/South-Eastern European sound it’s not surprising that it was recorded and produced in Hungary or that the band has toured that part of the world a couple of times. Guest performances help fill out the songs here and there beautifully, but only work because the fundamentals are so strong.The lack of intensity doesn’t stop this being an album you can lose yourself in with headphones on as you drink up every sound, but it has the advantage of being playable in the background and in a range of moods that a lot of progressive rock just doesn’t work in. It’s an important addition to the broadening tapestry that is Australian progressive rock." - Echoes And Dust
    $15.00